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Padma Vibhushan

The Padma Vibhushan is the second-highest civilian award of the Republic of India, second only to the Bharat Ratna. Instituted on 2 January 1954, the award is given for "exceptional and distinguished service", without distinction of race, position, or sex; the award criteria include "service in any field including service rendered by Government servants" including doctors and scientists, but excluding those working with the public sector undertakings. Up to january 2020, the award has been bestowed on 314 individuals, including 16 posthumous and 21 non-citizen recipients. During 1 May and 15 September of every year, the recommendations for the award are submitted to the Padma Awards Committee, constituted by the Prime Minister of India; the recommendations are received from all the state and the union territory governments, the Ministries of the Government of India, the Bharat Ratna and previous Padma Vibhushan award recipients, the Institutes of Excellence, the Ministers, the Chief Ministers and the Governors of State, the Members of Parliament including private individuals.

The committee submits their recommendations to the Prime Minister and the President of India for the further approval. The award recipients are announced on Republic Day; the first recipients of the award were Satyendra Nath Bose, Nand Lal Bose, Zakir Hussain, Balasaheb Gangadhar Kher, Jigme Dorji Wangchuck, V. K. Krishna Menon, who were honoured in 1954; the 1954 statutes did not allow posthumous awards but this was subsequently modified in the January 1955 statute. The "Padma Vibhushan", along with other personal civil honours, was suspended twice, from July 1977 to January 1980 and from August 1992 to December 1995; some of the recipients have returned their conferments. P. N. Haksar, Vilayat Khan, E. M. S. Namboodiripad, Swami Ranganathananda, Manikonda Chalapathi Rau refused the award, the family members of Lakshmi Chand Jain and Sharad Anantrao Joshi declined their posthumous conferments, Baba Amte returned his 1986 conferment in 1991. Most on 25 January 2020, the award has been bestowed upon seven recipients - George Fernandes, Arun Jaitley, Anerood Jugnauth, Mary Kom, Chhannulal Mishra, Sushma Swaraj and Vishwesha Teertha.

On 2 January 1954, a press release was published from the office of the secretary to the President of India announcing the creation of two civilian awards—Bharat Ratna, the highest civilian award, the three-tier Padma Vibhushan, classified into "Pahla Varg", "Dusra Varg", "Tisra Varg", which rank below the Bharat Ratna. On 15 January 1955, the Padma Vibhushan was reclassified into three different awards: the Padma Vibhushan, the highest of the three, followed by the Padma Bhushan and the Padma Shri; the award, along with other personal civilian honours, was suspended twice in its history. The suspension was rescinded on 25 January 1980; the civilian awards were suspended again in mid-1992, when two Public-Interest Litigations were filed in the High Courts of India, one in the Kerala High Court on 13 February 1992 by Balaji Raghavan and another in the Madhya Pradesh High Court on 24 August 1992 by Satya Pal Anand. Both petitioners questioned the civilian awards being "titles" per an interpretation of Article 18 of the Constitution of India.

On 25 August 1992, the Madhya Pradesh High Court issued a notice temporarily suspending all civilian awards. A Special Division Bench of the Supreme Court of India was formed comprising five judges: A. M. Ahmadi C. J. Kuldip Singh, B. P. Jeevan Reddy, N. P. Singh, S. Saghir Ahmad. On 15 December 1995, the Special Division Bench restored the awards and delivered a judgment that the "Bharat Ratna and Padma awards are not titles under Article 18 of the Constitution of India"; the award is conferred for "exceptional and distinguished service", without distinction of race, position, or sex. The criteria include "service in any field including service rendered by Government servants", but excludes those working with the public sector undertakings, with the exception of doctors and scientists; the 1954 statutes did not allow posthumous awards, but this was subsequently modified in the January 1955 statute. The recommendations are received from all state and union territory governments, the Ministries of the Government of India, the Bharat Ratna and previous Padma Vibhushan award recipients, the Institutes of Excellence, the Ministers, the Chief Ministers, the Governors of State, the Members of Parliament, including private individuals.

The recommendations received during 1 May and 15 September of every year are submitted to the Padma Awards Committee, convened by the Prime Minister of India. The Awards Committee submits its recommendations to the Prime Minister and the President of India for further approval; the Padma Vibhushan award recipients are announced every year on Republic Day of India and registered in The Gazette of India—a publication released weekly by the Department of Publication, Ministry of Urban Development used for official government notices. The conferral of the award is not considered official without its publication in the Gazette. Recipients whose awards have been revoked or restored, both of which actions require the authority of the President, are registered in the Gazette and are required to surrender their medals when their names are struck from the register; the original 1954 specifications of the award called for a circle made of gold gilt 1 3⁄8 inches (3

G.I. Joe: Timeless Collection

G. I. Joe: Timeless Collection is an action figure and accessories set reproducing Hasbro G. I. Joe product themes of the late 1960s- early 1970s; the set was produced from 1998 to 2003. In the tail end of the 1990s Hasbro built on the renewed interest in authentic reproductions of G. I. Joe established by the Masterpiece Edition reproduction book/figure set. I. Joe boxed sets. Issues were themed after the Adventure Team sets, with flock hair and "kung fu" gripping hands, excluding the African-American figure. By the end of the run, the product line was somewhat confused, since the Adventure Team premise was being offered with the new 90s body, in sets such as Secret of the Mummy's Tomb, Danger of the Depths and Search for the Yeti; the first two sets of releases consisted of four offerings from FAO Schwarz, Toys "R" Us, KayBee Toys, Target. The contents of the store exclusive sets was determined in part by the market the particular store served, so price-wise the spread was Target, KayBee FAO on the high end.

These releases brought together figure and a complete set of related accessories that were for the most part never offered in a single package in their original 1960s versions, but would have been offered as figure/carded accessories. Some sets were available with African-American figures; the fact that the main audience for these figure sets was adult males in their 30s–40s has bearing on the pricing and packaging of these offerings. The packaging and included graphics were designed to evoke the style and feel of the original 60's releases. Timeless Collection I and II featured a lidded window box for the more expensive offerings, similar to the early Classic Collection. Timeless Collection I featured green boxes with a green marbled strip across the top and bottom of the boxes; this style of packaging design was first used with the Classic Collection FAO Schwarz F15E pilot, several years earlier. Target Stores offered footlocker. Toys'R' Us offered Mission: Splashdown, one of the two physically largest store release packages.

FAO Schwarz had an elaborate wooden box set for their exclusive Green Beret. KayBee Toys offered Heavy Weapons. Walmart's offerings, "General Ulysses S. Grant" and limited edition "General Robert E. Lee" was labeled "Civil War Series", it is a bit of an anomaly, since no such figure existed in the original 60's lineup. Timeless Collection II switched to a brown coloration. Toys'R' Us offered the "Rescue of the Lost Squadron", the other of the two physically largest store release packages. FAO Schwarz continued the elaborate wooden box format for their exclusive Marine Jungle Fighter. KayBee Toys offered the Deep Sea Diver, again with equipment. Target released a lower priced Action Sailor, in either African American. Neither the Toys nor Target packages had the signature marbled lidded cover. Timeless Collection III included Target's "Scramble Pilot" and Kaybee's "Talking Action Pilot", with the Talker pilot in the lidded box format, which included a graphic representation of the original figure box on the cover.

The parachute included with the talker pilot was just for show, it was not functional as was the original 60's version. J. C. Penney offered the "Forward Observer Set". Subsequent releases were labeled "Timeless Collection - Reminiscent of the Golden Age of G. I. Joe" in a window box format utilizing a nice heavy card construction, with graphics and details from the original 60's releases. All sets were store exclusives, J. C. Penney was added to the roster; these sets included "Talking Action Sailor", "Green Beret machine Gun Outpost", "Australian Jungle Fighter" which had the "Foreign Head" as with the original 60's release, "Airborne Military Police". In many sets, all the accessories were die-cast metal instead of plastic, a nice touch, if somewhat impractical if one wished to pose the figures holding them! Not to be outdone, the FAO Schwarz offerings contained two figures in each set; the late sixties "Adventures of G. I. Joe" series that preceded the advent of the Adventure Team was featured with sets such as "Perilous Rescue", "Secret Mission to Spy Island", amongst others.

The latter issues were "adventure team" -based sets such as "Black Spider Rendezvous", "Undercover Agent", "Skydive to Danger", "Eight Ropes of Danger", featured a fuzz-head, kung fu grip version of the TC figure. Some of the last releases such as Skydive contained a fuzz head, kung fu grip 40th Anniversary body instead of the TC version, the packaging was of the lighter weight card, closer in design to that used for the Classic Collection-based Adventure Team figures, such as Search For The Yeti; the figure was based on the ME doll, with a change of skin tone and facial coloring, which in turn was a reproduction of the doll Hasbro had patented during the 1960s. The original patent drawings can be viewed by searching the US Patent and Trademark office free of charge; the skin tone was more tan, lacked the unfortunate pinkish shine of the ME release. The features were painted with colors not

Leipzig Homicide

Leipzig Homicide is a German crime drama television series. It was first broadcast on 31 January 2001, on German television channel ZDF and more than 300 episodes have broadcast since; the series averages 5 million viewers per week. On 12 November 2008, the first part of a two-part crossover between SOKO Leipzig and British police procedural The Bill was aired, with the same version being shown on both ZDF and British television channel ITV1; the series is about the investigative work of the Special Commission of the Leipzig police. The team, consisting of Hajo Trautzschke, Jan Maybach, Ina Zimmermann and Tom Kowalski investigate in capital crimes like murder or manslaughter, they are supported by team assistant Olivia Fareedi, coroner Prof. Dr. Sabine Rossi and Dr. Stein as well as laboratory assistant Lorenz Rettig and prosecutor Dr. Alexander Binz. In cases concerning sexual offenses, Dagmar Schnee is in the team. In April 2013 was started with the filming of a five-part crossover between all ZDF SOKO-series: SOKO – Der Prozess.

The teams from the SOKOs 5113, Leipzig and Wismar clarify to the murder of a policeman and move off in a criminal milieu in which to rule their own law and its own order. Leipzig Homicide is produced by UFA Fiction; the Executive Producer and Showrunner is Jörg Winger. The studio is located in the Reclam-Carrée in the Inselstraße 22 in Leipzig; the Bill List of German television series SOKO – Der Prozess Leipzig Homicide at ZDF Leipzig Homicide at UFA Leipzig Homicide at fernsehserien.de Leipzig Homicide on IMDb