SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Palm Springs International Film Festival

Palm Springs International Film Festival is a film festival held in Palm Springs, California. Promoted by Mayor Sonny Bono and sponsored by Nortel, it started in 1989 and is held annually in January, it is run by the Palm Springs International Film Society, which runs the Palm Springs International Festival of Short Films, a festival of short films and film market in June. Though the festival does feature American independent films, the focus from its inception was to shine a spotlight on international cinema. Michael Barker, co-president of Sony Pictures Classics, described the festival as a good place to show foreign-language movies and heralded this festival's ability to spread good word-of-mouth for movies; the event is noted for screening most foreign Oscar nominees. In 2013, the festival screened 42 of the 71 movies that were submitted by countries around the world to the Oscars for that year's foreign language film prize. In the days before the festival's opening, several of the foreign filmmakers convene at Sunnylands, the Annenberg estate in Rancho Mirage, to trade strategies on funding and promoting their movies.

The festival attracts around 135,000 people, with some 70% coming from outside of the Coachella Valley, including Canada and Europe. It is noted for its Award Ceremonies where such actors as Christian Bale, Brad Pitt, Clint Eastwood, Sean Penn, Dustin Hoffman, Anne Hathaway and Leonardo DiCaprio have appeared. In January 2011, the festival's honorees included Danny Boyle; the current Artistic Director of the festival is Liliana Rodriguez. The Gala awards are Sonny Bono Visionary Award, Career Achievement Award, Desert Palm Achievement Award, Director of the Year Award, Frederick Loewe Award for Film Composing, Icon Award, Chairman’s Award, Ensemble Performance Award and Spotlight Award. In 2014 the Desert Palm Achievement Award was given to Matthew McConaughey for his role in Dallas Buyers Club and Sandra Bullock for her role in Gravity, while Johnny Depp and Cate Blanchett received the Desert Palm Achievement Award in 2016 for Black Mass and Carol, respectively. Casey Affleck received the Desert Palm Achievement Award in 2017 for Manchester by the Sea.

Gary Oldman and Saoirse Ronan received the Desert Palm Achievement Award in 2018. The following awards were presented at the 2019 Palm Springs International Film Festival: FIPRESCI Prize for Best Foreign Language Film, FIPRESCI Prize for Best Actor in a Foreign Language Film, FIPRESCI Prize for Best Actress in a Foreign Language Film, New Voices New Visions Award, John Schlesinger Award, CV Cine Award, Ricky Jay Magic of Cinema Award, GoE Bridging the Borders Award, Audience Award for Best Narrative Feature, the Audience Award for Best Documentary Feature. Official website

2019 Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district special election

A special election was held on May 21, 2019, to fill the remainder of the term for Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district in the United States House of Representatives for the 116th United States Congress. Tom Marino, a Republican, resigned from office effective January 23; as a result of the 2018 elections, Pennsylvania's House delegation to the 116th U. S. Congress took office in early January 2019 with a tie of 9 Democrats. Republican Tom Marino, the incumbent representative for Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district, announced his resignation effective January 23, 2019. By state law, Governor Tom Wolf was required to call for a special election at least 60 days after the seat became vacant. Wolf set the election for May 21. Primary elections were not held in the race. Instead, nominees were chosen by each party. Republicans selected their nominee on March 2. Fred Keller, state representative Jessica Bowman-Hosley, professor Malcolm Derk, former Snyder County commissioner Kevin Ferrara, veteran Stacy Garrity, businesswoman Davis C.

Haire, doctor Chris Hoffman, vice president of the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau Matthew McDermott Doug McLinko, Bradford County commissioner and candidate for Pennsylvania's 12th congressional district in 2018 Patrick Miller, law student Maria Montero Joseph Moralez, vice president of a statewide nursing agency Robert Noerr, former National Debate Tournament qualifier Joseph Peters, former state deputy attorney general and candidate for Pennsylvania's 8th congressional district in 2018 Christopher Bain James Canning and constable Gerald Carlin, businessman Brian Fuller, activist Bobby Jeffries Dale McElhattan Chuck Risio Matthew Timm Jeff Wheeland, state representative Matthew Zeigler, lawyer Lou Barletta, former U. S. Representative and nominee for U. S. Senate in 2018 Jake Corman, majority leader of the Pennsylvania State Senate Keith Eckel, former president of the State Farm Bureau Jonathan Fritz, state representative Davis C. Haire Sandra Major, former state representative Tony Mussare, Lycoming County commissioner Michael Peifer, state representative Mario Scavello, state senator Jeff Stroehmann, businessman Dave Weber, district director for outgoing U.

S. Representative Tom Marino Eugene Yaw, state senator According to the Pennsylvania Democratic Party, Marc Friedenberg, the Democratic nominee for the district in 2018, was the only individual who submitted an application to be the nominee. Therefore, the convention was cancelled, the party declared Friedenberg the nominee on February 12. List of special elections to the United States House of Representatives Official campaign websitesMarc Friedenberg for Congress Fred Keller for Congress

Scio, Oregon

Scio is a city in Linn County, United States. The population was 838 at the 2010 census. Oregon Geographic Names suggests that Scio was named by one of the original residents, William McKinney, with Henry L. Turner, set up a flour mill at the new town. Turner suggested McKinney come up with a name for the place, McKinney used the name of his former home, Ohio. Scio in Ohio is, in turn named for a Greek island called Chios. Scio post office, headed by postmaster Euphronius Wheeler, was established on October 3, 1860. Thomas Creek, which flows through the city, was named for Frederick Thomas, who obtained a Donation Land Claim and settled on the banks of the creek in 1846. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.38 square miles, all land. This region experiences warm and dry summers, with no average monthly temperatures above 71.6 °F. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Scio has a warm-summer Mediterranean climate, abbreviated "Csb" on climate maps.

As of the census of 2010, there were 838 people, 306 households, 225 families living in the city. The population density was 2,205.3 inhabitants per square mile. There were 324 housing units at an average density of 852.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 91.4% White, 0.4% African American, 1.8% Native American, 0.6% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 2.0% from other races, 3.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.1% of the population. There were 306 households of which 35.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.3% were married couples living together, 14.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.5% had a male householder with no wife present, 26.5% were non-families. 20.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.18. The median age in the city was 34.8 years. 27.1% of residents were under the age of 18.

The gender makeup of the city was 50.2 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 695 people, 265 households, 188 families living in the city; the population density was 2,202.6 people per square mile. There were 278 housing units at an average density of 881.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 93.24% White, 3.88% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.14% from other races, 2.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.87% of the population. There were 265 households out of which 35.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.7% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.7% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.07. In the city, the population was spread out with 28.9% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 84.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.0 males. The median income for a household in the city was $36,111, the median income for a family was $38,906. Males had a median income of $31,726 versus $27,833 for females; the per capita income for the city was $16,222. About 7.7% of families and 10.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.8% of those under age 18 and 29.9% of those age 65 or over. Scio refers to itself as the "Covered Bridge Capital of the West." There are five bridges as part of its Covered Bridge Tour out of a total of eight in Linn County. Scio is home to the ZCBJ Hall, a lodge built on beside Thomas Creek in 1922 by the large Czechoslovakian population living in the area. Now owned by the Linn County Lamb and Wool Fair, the lodge is used for community events and rented out for private events such as weddings. Listing for Scio in the Oregon Blue Book