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Pike County, Georgia

Pike County is a county located in the west central portion of the U. S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 17,869; the county seat is Zebulon. Pike County was made from part of Monroe County in 1822, it was named after Zebulon Montgomery Pike and army officer. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 219 square miles, of which 216 square miles is land and 3.3 square miles is water. The entirety of Pike County is located in the Upper Flint River sub-basin of the ACF River Basin. Spalding County Lamar County Upson County Meriwether County As of the census of 2000, there were 13,688 people, 4,755 households, 3,784 families living in the county; the population density was 63 people per square mile. There were 5,068 housing units at an average density of 23 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 83.64% White, 14.79% Black or African American, 0.21% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.42% from other races, 0.57% from two or more races. 1.22 % of the population were Latino of any race.

There were 4,755 households out of which 37.00% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.40% were married couples living together, 10.50% had a female householder with no husband present, 20.40% were non-families. 17.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.50% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.18. In the county, the population was spread out with 27.60% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 30.20% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, 10.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.70 males. The median income for a household in the county was $44,370, the median income for a family was $49,798. Males had a median income of $33,114 versus $23,800 for females; the per capita income for the county was $17,661. About 6.90% of families and 9.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.60% of those under age 18 and 11.00% of those age 65 or over.

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 17,869 people, 6,187 households, 4,906 families living in the county. The population density was 82.7 inhabitants per square mile. There were 6,820 housing units at an average density of 31.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 87.3% white, 10.3% black or African American, 0.3% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.4% from other races, 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.1% of the population. In terms of ancestry, 21.4% were American, 17.6% were English, 17.1% were Irish, 13.2% were German. Of the 6,187 households, 41.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.3% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 20.7% were non-families, 17.6% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.20. The median age was 38.5 years. The median income for a household in the county was $53,213 and the median income for a family was $57,458.

Males had a median income of $43,958 versus $28,148 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,051. About 9.4% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.7% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over. Georgia Military College has an extension campus near Zebulon City Hall; the Pike County School District serves Pike County. The school district has one Pre-K building, one primary school, one elementary school, one middle school, a ninth grade academy and one high school. Michael Duncan, Ed. D is the Superintendent of Schools. Meansville Molena Zebulon Concord Williamson Hilltop Jolly Lifsey National Register of Historic Places listings in Pike County, Georgia

Ruby Blast

Ruby Blast is a match 3 arcade game by Zynga. The game was first released in June 2012 on Facebook and Zynga.com and re-branded to Ruby Blast Adventures after Zynga added a new mode with map progression. An iOS version of Ruby Blast was released in November 2012 with an Android version expected soon. In the game, players try to match three or more gems to activate power ups and dig deeper into a mine. Ruby Blast on iOS is the first arcade mobile game from Zynga and the latest Zynga game that enables players to carry progress from the Web version to mobile. Ruby Blast was closed on January 4, 2014. Ruby Blast was released June 19, 2012 for Facebook and Zynga.com in 15 languages and was the first game to launch from both Zynga China and Zynga Seattle. Ruby Blast on Facebook and Zynga.com evolved into Ruby Blast Adventures, adding themed-level progression. On November 15, 2012, Zynga released Ruby Blast on iOS devices and said an Android version would follow; the mobile version was built by Zynga's China team.

As of late December 2012, the game had 9.9 million monthly active users across Web and mobile platforms. Ruby Blast and Ruby Blast Adventures are match 3 puzzle games in which players attempt to match three or more gems to help Ruby, the game’s protagonist, recover ancient artifacts; as players match gems, they dig deeper into a mine by activating power-ups. In the connected, multi-platform game, all progress including scores, coins, levels and in-game currency is synchronized between the mobile and Web versions. Players compete to rise to the top of the leaderboard. Both the mobile and Web versions enable players to compete in weekly tournaments and offer ways to help out their friends; the Web game offers an Adventure Mode, in which players advance through multiple levels and have the ability to compete against other players globally for prizes. Ruby Blast and Ruby Blast Adventures are free to play on iOS devices. There is a paid $1 iOS app. Through a partnership between Zynga.org and the United Nations World Food Programme, players of Ruby Blast Adventures on the Web were able to donate to the non-profit organization by purchasing in-game items.

Ruby Blast Adventures on Facebook Ruby Blast Adventures on Zynga.com

City and Territory Museum

The City and Territory Museum is a museum in Vetralla, central Italy. It was founded in 1992 by Elisabetta De Minicis, it is located. It is run by the Tuscia University in Viterbo; the museum was created as a center for documenting the architectural traditions of small towns, with special attention to Tuscia, has expanded to include several areas relating to local construction techniques, traditional crafts, folklore. The museum presents a careful survey of the quarries, ironworks and wood cutting, their associated tools; the museum has promoted the recording of the work of living local craftsmen, who are custodians of arts passed down through the centuries. In 2008, it opened a cellar, an underground museum where it reconstructed a nineteenth-century cellar where all the items related to wine production are shown; the museum has launched a catalog of all the categories of cultural goods at increased risk in Tuscia, including private houses, medieval walls, decorative pavements, street trees, street furniture, historic gardens, more, offering documentation about the real state of the local heritage and suggesting proper restoration and enhancement.

The City and Territory Museum is houses the associations Vetralla Città d'Arte and Diva Cassia. Both are designed to protect and enhance the artistic, historical and environmental heritage of Vetralla and its region. Mary Jane Cryan, International Accents at Vetralla's Museum, in Studi Vetrallesi, 1, gennaio Giugno 1998 Luciana Finelli, L’attività culturale del Museo della Città e del Territorio, in Studi Vetrallesi, 4, luglio/dicembre 1999 Enrico Guidoni, Il nome del Museo, Vetralla Città d’Arte, S. Maria di Foro Cassio, la Casa Museo, in Studi Vetrallesi, 10, luglio/dicembre 2002 Elisabetta De Minicis, Le sezione ceramica, Vetralla 2005 Official website Davide Ghaleb, the museum's publisher

Chloris

In Greek mythology, the name Chloris appears in a variety of contexts. Some refer to different characters. Chloris, a nymph loved by Zephyrus. Chloris, wife of Neleus, king of Pylos, it is, not always clear whether she or the below Chloris is mentioned in this role. Chloris, one of the Niobids. Chloris, daughter of Orchomenus, married the seer Ampyx, with whom she had a child Mopsus who became a renowned seer and would join the Argonauts; the Argonautica Orphica calls her by Aregonis. In some accounts, she mothered Mopsus by Zeus. Family tree of the Greek gods Gaius Julius Hyginus, Fabulae from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies. Online version at the Topos Text Project. Pseudo-Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F. B. A. F. R. S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website. Pseudo-Clement, Recognitions from Ante-Nicene Library Volume 8, translated by Rev. Thomas.

T. & T. Clark, Edinburgh. 1867. Online version at theio.com Publius Ovidius Naso, Fasti translated by James G. Frazer. Online version at the Topos Text Project. Publius Ovidius Naso, Fasti. Sir James George Frazer. London. William Heinemann Ltd.. 1933. Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library; the Orphic Argonautica, translated by Jason Colavito. © Copyright 2011. Online version at the Topos Text Project

10,000 metres

The 10,000 metres or the 10,000-metre run is a common long-distance track running event. The event is part of the athletics programme at the Olympic Games and the World Championships in Athletics and is common at championship level events; the race consists of 25 laps around an Olympic-sized track. It is less held at track and field meetings, due to its duration; the 10,000-metre track race is distinguished from its road running counterpart, the 10K run, by its reference to the distance in metres rather than kilometres. The 10,000 metres is the longest standard track event; the international distance is 6.2137 miles. Most of those running such races compete in road races and cross country events. Added to the Olympic programme in 1912, athletes from Finland, nicknamed the "Flying Finns", dominated the event until the late 1940s. In the 1960s, African runners began to come to the fore. In 1988, the women's competition debuted in the Olympic Games. Official records are kept for outdoor 10,000-metre track events.

The world record for men is held by Kenenisa Bekele of Ethiopia in 26:17.53, posted at Brussels, Belgium on August 26, 2005. For women, the world track 10,000-metre record is held by Almaz Ayana of Ethiopia in 29:17.45 to win gold at the 2016 Rio Olympics on August 12, 2016. The 10,000 metres demands exceptional levels of aerobic endurance, elite athletes train in excess of 160 km a week. 10,000 metres is the longer metric derivative of the 6-mile run, an event common in countries when they were using the imperial measurement system. 6 miles was used in the Commonwealth Games until 1966 and was a championship in the United States in non-Olympic years from 1953 to 1973. It is 24 laps around a quarter mile 1320 ft 0 in track. Correct as of October 2019. Below is a list of other times equal or superior to 26:46.31: Kenenisa Bekele ran 26:20.31, 26:25.97, 26:28.72, 26:43.16, 26:46.19, 26:46.31. Haile Gebrselassie ran 26:29.22, 26:31.32, 26:41.58, 26:43.53. Boniface Toroitich Kiprop ran 26:41.95. Leonard Komon of Kenya ran the 10k road distance in a time of 26:44 in a world record performance in Utrecht on 26 September 2011.

While run over the same distance, the time was set on a road course and is therefore not eligible to be considered among the top performances listed here. Correct as of September 2019. Below is a list of other times equal or superior to 30:17.15: Tirunesh Dibaba ran 29:54.66, 30:15.67. Almaz Ayana ran 30:07.00, 30:16.32. Meseret Defar ran 30:08.06. Paula Radcliffe ran 30:17.15. Elvan Abeylegesse of Turkey's time of 29:56.34 set in Beijing on 15 August 2008 was annulled due to doping offense. Joyciline Jepkosgei of Kenya ran the 10k distance in a time of 30:04 en route to her world record performance in the half-marathon in Prague on 1 April 2017. While run over the same distance, the time was set on a road course and is therefore ineligible to be considered among the top performances listed here. Violah Jepchumba of Kenya ran the 10k distance in a time of 30:05 en route to her personal best in the half-marathon in Prague on 1 April 2017. While run over the same distance, the time was set on a road course and is therefore ineligible to be considered among the top performances listed here.

European Cup 10,000m Iberian 10,000 Metres Championships IAAF list of 10000-metres records in XML ARRS: Yearly Rankings - 10,000 meters Outdoor Track 10K Races in Race-Calendar.com

Inter-Allied Games

The Inter-Allied Games was a one-off multi-sport event held from 22 June to 6 July 1919 at the newly constructed Pershing Stadium just outside Paris, France following the end of World War I. The host stadium had been built near the Bois de Vincennes by the U. S. Military in cooperation with the YMCA; the event was only open to participation by military personnel who were serving or had served in the armed forces during the War. Around 1500 athletes from a total of eighteen nations participated in the proceedings which featured nineteen sports. Following the conclusion of the games, Pershing Stadium was presented as a gift to the people of France from the United States of America; the area, still known as Le Stade Pershing, continues to be used as an open air recreation park to this day. A total of nineteen sports were contested at the games. A number of military-oriented events was planned, but only hand-grenade throwing and shooting made it on to the final programme. A total of twenty-eight nations from the Allies of World War I were invited to the competition and eighteen nations accepted the invite.

China aimed to compete, but was unable to send any athletes to the games within the time scale. It did, provide medals and trophies in support of the games; the Kingdom of Hejaz sent a delegation but with no athletes, choosing to demonstrate the skills of their Arabian horsemen instead. A full list of participants was made by the organisers; these athletes competed in and won gold medals at the 1919 Inter-Allied Games: Ralph Parcaut - Gold Medal, Light Heavyweight Division, Catch as Catch Can Wrestling Paul Prehn - Gold Medal, Middleweight Division, Catch as Catch Can Wrestling Gene Tunney - Gold Medal, Boxing Max Friedman - Gold medal, Basketball Norman Ross - 5 Gold Medals, Swimming Carl F. Haas, William Clinton Gray, Floyd F. Campbell, Lawrence M. Shields - Medley Relay Race United States of America, First Place, Rifle Shooting Team, Team Members include - Brigadier General Paul A. Wolf Bell, Daniel. Encyclopedia of International Games. McFarland and Company, Inc. Publishers, North Carolina.

ISBN 0-7864-1026-4. Full text of The inter-allied games, Paris, 22nd June to 6th July, 1919. Albert R Mann, Cornell University Library. Report on football tournament List Track and Field results A description of the basketball tournament