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Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI is a retired prelate of the Catholic Church who served as head of the Church and sovereign of the Vatican City State from 2005 until his resignation in 2013. Benedict's election as pope occurred in the 2005 papal conclave that followed the death of Pope John Paul II. Benedict chose to be known by the title "pope emeritus" upon his resignation. Ordained as a priest in 1951 in his native Bavaria, Ratzinger had established himself as a regarded university theologian by the late 1950s and was appointed a full professor in 1958. After a long career as an academic and professor of theology at several German universities, he was appointed Archbishop of Munich and Freising and Cardinal by Pope Paul VI in 1977, an unusual promotion for someone with little pastoral experience. In 1981, he was appointed Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, one of the most important dicasteries of the Roman Curia. From 2002 until his election as pope, he was Dean of the College of Cardinals.

Prior to becoming pope, he was "a major figure on the Vatican stage for a quarter of a century". He has lived in Rome since 1981, his prolific writings defend traditional Catholic doctrine and values. He was a liberal theologian, but adopted conservative views after 1968. During his papacy, Benedict XVI advocated a return to fundamental Christian values to counter the increased secularisation of many Western countries, he views relativism's denial of objective truth, the denial of moral truths in particular, as the central problem of the 21st century. He taught the importance of both an understanding of God's redemptive love. Pope Benedict revived a number of traditions, including elevating the Tridentine Mass to a more prominent position, he strengthened the relationship between the Catholic Church and art, promoted the use of Latin, reintroduced traditional papal garments, for which reason he was called "the pope of aesthetics". He has been described as "the main intellectual force in the Church" since the mid-1980s.

On 11 February 2013, Benedict unexpectedly announced his resignation in a speech in Latin before the cardinals, citing a "lack of strength of mind and body" due to his advanced age. His resignation became effective on 28 February 2013, he is the first pope to resign since Gregory XII in 1415, the first to do so on his own initiative since Celestine V in 1294. As pope emeritus, Benedict retains the style of His Holiness and continues to dress in the papal colour of white, he was succeeded by Pope Francis on 13 March 2013, he moved into the newly renovated Mater Ecclesiae Monastery for his retirement on 2 May 2013. In his retirement, Benedict XVI has made occasional public appearances alongside Francis. Joseph Aloisius Ratzinger was born on 16 April, Holy Saturday, 1927, at Schulstraße 11, at 8:30 in the morning in his parents' home in Marktl, Germany, he was baptised the same day. He is the third and youngest child of Joseph Ratzinger Sr. a police officer, Maria Ratzinger. His mother's family was from South Tyrol.

Pope Benedict's elder brother, Georg Ratzinger, is a Catholic priest and is the former director of the Regensburger Domspatzen choir. His sister, Maria Ratzinger, who never married, managed Cardinal Ratzinger's household until her death in 1991. At the age of five, Ratzinger was in a group of children who welcomed the visiting Cardinal Archbishop of Munich, Michael von Faulhaber, with flowers. Struck by the cardinal's distinctive garb, he announced that day that he wanted to be a cardinal, he attended the elementary school in Aschau am Inn, renamed in his honour in 2009. Ratzinger's family his father, bitterly resented the Nazis, his father's opposition to Nazism resulted in demotions and harassment of the family. Following his 14th birthday in 1941, Ratzinger was conscripted into the Hitler Youth—as membership was required by law for all 14-year-old German boys after March 1939—but was an unenthusiastic member who refused to attend meetings, according to his brother. In 1941, one of Ratzinger's cousins, a 14-year-old boy with Down syndrome, was taken away by the Nazi regime and murdered during the Action T4 campaign of Nazi eugenics.

In 1943, while still in seminary, he was drafted into the German anti-aircraft corps as Luftwaffenhelfer. Ratzinger trained in the German infantry; as the Allied front drew closer to his post in 1945, he deserted back to his family's home in Traunstein after his unit had ceased to exist, just as American troops established a headquarters in the Ratzinger household. As a German soldier, he was interned in a prisoner of war camp, but released a few months at the end of the war in May 1945. Ratzinger and his brother Georg entered Saint Michael Seminary in Traunstein in November 1945 studying at the Ducal Georgianum of the Ludwig-Maximilian University in Munich, they were both ordained in Freising on 29 June 1951 by Cardinal Michael von Faulhaber of Munich. Ratzinger recalled: "at the moment the elderly Archbishop laid his hands on me, a little bird – a lark – flew up from the altar in the high cathedral and trilled a little joyful song."Ratzinger's 1953 dissertation was on St. Augustine and was titled The People and the House of God in Augustine's Doctrine of the Church.

His habilitation was on Bonaventure. It was comple

The Big Egg Hunt

The Big Egg Hunt known as the Faberge Big Egg Hunt, was a 2012 charity fundraising campaign, in aid of Action for Children and Elephant Family, sponsored by the jeweller Faberge. The two charities backed the largest Easter egg hunt, known as The Big Egg Hunt, in London in the Spring of 2012. Around 200 artists and designers created and painted metre high fibreglass eggs which were scattered across selected locations around London. Londoners had forty days from 21 February 2012 to locate the various giant eggs around the capital; the event followed the Elephant Parade of 2010, organised by Mark Shand and Ruth Powys of Elephant Family, which saw 260 decorated fibreglass elephants installed throughout London. Elephant Parade raised around £4m for elephant related charities through sponsorship and by selling the individual works of art at auction; the top price paid for a decorated elephant was £155,000 for Jack Vettriano's The Singing Butler Rides Again. Elephant Parade was itself inspired by Cow Parade, which had its beginnings in Switzerland in 1998 but has since spread around the world.

The Big Egg Hunt was first launched in November 2011 by food writer Tom Parker Bowles, who created a special "Eggs Faberge" breakfast for the celebrities in attendance. The metre-high eggs were distributed to various artists and designers. Among the artists contributing designs were Sir Peter Blake, Polly Morgan, The Chapman Brothers, Vivienne Westwood, Giles Deacon, Zandra Rhodes, Diane Von Furstenberg, Sophie Dahl, Martin Aveling, cartoonist Alex Williams and film director Sir Ridley Scott On 21 February 2012 the Big Egg hunt went "live", with over 200 eggs being distributed throughout the capital, in what has been billed as the world's largest Easter egg hunt; each egg displays a unique code which allows participants in the egg hunt the opportunity to win a so-called Diamond Jubilee egg, crafted by Faberge and worth over £100,000. On 25 February it was reported; the event organisers appealed for their safe return. The two missing eggs were the "Egg Letter Box" created by Benjamin Shine, located on Carnaby Street, "Hatch" created by artist Natasha Law.

Law's egg was recovered by police a few hours but had been damaged and was in need of repairs. Following the theft, Elephant Family founder Mark Shand was reported as saying that the other eggs had been secured and were now "unstealable". On 28 February it was reported in the Evening Standard that the "Egg Letter Box" had been recovered by the Police. One egg, the "sub-terra" egg designed by theme park Alton Towers to promote its "Nemesis" ride, was rejected by a number of locations for being too scary Around 30 of the eggs were auctioned on 20 March in front of a celebrity audience at the Royal Courts of Justice, where a grand total of £667,000 was raised for the two charities. Marc Quinn’s egg sold for £40,000 and that of architect Zaha Hadid raised £45,000. A chocolate egg set a record for the world's most expensive chocolate egg; the remaining eggs were auctioned on line, with bids closing at 5pm on Monday 9 April 2012. From 3 to 9 April all the eggs were displayed together, in Covent Garden, for the first and last time.

On Easter Sunday Guinness World Records announced that a new title had been achieved for the most participants in an Easter egg hunt. More than 12,000 people took part in the charity fundraiser. Cow Parade Elephant Parade the Big Egg Hunt at Forbes.com Retrieved January 2012 Official Site of the Big Egg Hunt Retrieved January 2012 the Big Egg Hunt at Facebook Retrieved January 2012 The Big Egg Hunt "Cheat Sheet" Retrieved February 2012 Big Egg Hunt at www.spectator.co.uk Retrieved March 2012

Overqualified (short story collection)

Overqualified is an art project by Canadian writer Joey Comeau in which he wrote a series of cover letters as job applications to companies. The letters were collected into a book and published as Overqualified by ECW Press in 2009; the letters all start off as standard cover letters, but turn dark, inevitably reveal the author to be mentally unstable. Excerpts from the book were included in the 2010 Best American Nonrequired Reading. Schaub, Michael. "Overqualified". Bookslut. Retrieved October 6, 2009. Bethune, Brian. "Overqualified". Maclean's. Retrieved April 5, 2009. Kellogg, Carolyn. "Overqualified". LA Times. Retrieved March 19, 2009. Code, Devon. "Overqualified". Quill and Quire. Retrieved March 10, 2009. Davis, Brian Joseph. "Overqualified". Eye Weekly. Retrieved March 10, 2009. Urbina, Ian. Life's Little Annoyances. Times Books. P. 54. ISBN 978-0-8050-8030-8. Overqualified