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Potawatomi

The Pottawatomi spelled Pottawatomie and Potawatomi, are a Native American people of the Great Plains, upper Mississippi River, western Great Lakes region. They traditionally speak a member of the Algonquian family; the Potawatomi call. The Potawatomi are part of a long-term alliance, called the Council of Three Fires, with the Ojibwe and Odawa. In the Council of Three Fires, the Potawatomi are considered the "youngest brother" and are referred to in this context as Bodéwadmi, a name that means "keepers of the fire" and refers to the council fire of three peoples. In the 19th century, they were pushed to the west by European/American encroachment in the late 18th century and removed from their lands in the Great Lakes region to reservations in Oklahoma. Under Indian Removal, they ceded many of their lands, most of the Potawatomi relocated to Nebraska and Indian Territory, now in Oklahoma; some bands today are federally recognized as tribes. In Canada, there are over 20 First Nation bands; the English "Potawatomi" is derived from the Ojibwe Boodewaadamii.

The Potawatomi name for themselves is a cognate of the Ojibwe form. Their name means "those who tend the hearth-fire," which refers to the hearth of the Council of Three Fires; the word comes from "to tend the hearth-fire,", bodewadm in the Potawatomi language. Alternatively, the Potawatomi call themselves Neshnabé, a cognate of Ojibwe Anishinaabe, meaning "original people"; the Potawatomi teach their children about the "Seven Grandfather Teachings" of wisdom, love, humility and truth toward each other and all creation, each one of which teaches them the equality and importance of their fellow tribesmen and respect for all of nature’s creations. The story itself teaches the importance of patience and listening as it follows the Water Spider's journey to retrieve fire for the other animals to survive the cold; as the other animals step forth one after another to proclaim that they shall be the ones to retrieve the fire, the Water spider sits and waits while listening to her fellow animals. As they finish and wrestle with their fears, she steps forward and announces that she will be the one to bring it back.

As they laugh and doubt her she weaves a bowl out of her own web that sails her across the water to retrieve the fire. She brings back a hot coal out of which they make fire, they celebrate her honor and bravery; the Potawatomi are first mentioned in French records, which suggest that in the early 17th century, they lived in what is now southwestern Michigan. During the Beaver Wars they fled to the area around Green Bay to escape attacks by both the Iroquois and the Neutral Nation, who were seeking expanded hunting grounds; as an important part of Tecumseh's Confederacy, Potawatomi warriors took part in Tecumseh's War, the War of 1812 and the Peoria War. Their alliances switched between Great Britain and the United States as power relations shifted between the nations, they calculated effects on their trade and land interests. At the time of the War of 1812, a band of Potawatomi inhabited the area near Fort Dearborn, where Chicago developed. Led by the chiefs Blackbird and Nuscotomeg, a force of about 500 warriors attacked the United States evacuation column leaving Fort Dearborn.

George Ronan, the first graduate of West Point to be killed in combat, died in this ambush. The incident is referred to as the "Fort Dearborn Massacre". A Potawatomi chief named Mucktypoke, counseled his fellow warriors against the attack, he saved some of the civilian captives who were being ransomed by the Potawatomi. The French period of contact began with early explorers who reached the Potawatomi in western Michigan, they found the tribe located along the Door Peninsula of Wisconsin. By the end of the French period, the Potawatomi had begun a move to the Detroit area, leaving the large communities in Wisconsin. Madouche during the Fox Wars Millouisillyny Onanghisse at Green Bay Otchik at Detroit The British period of contact began when France ceded its lands after the defeat in the French and Indian War. Pontiac's Rebellion was an attempt by Native Americans to push the British and other European settlers out of their territory; the Potawatomi captured every British Frontier Garrison but the one at Detroit.

The Potawatomi nation continued to grow and expanded westward from Detroit, most notably in the development of the St. Joseph villages adjacent to the Miami in southwestern Michigan; the Wisconsin communities moved south along the Lake Michigan shoreline. Nanaquiba at Detroit Ninivois at Detroit Peshibon at St. Joseph Washee at St. Joseph during Pontiac's Rebellion The United States Treaty period of Potawatomi history began with the Treaty of Paris, which ended the American Revolutionary War and established the United States' interest in the lower Great Lakes, it lasted. The US recognized the Potawatomi as a single tribe, they had a few tribal leaders whom all villages accepted. The Potawatomi had a decentralized society, with several main divisions based on geographic locations: Milwaukee or Wisconsin area, Detroit or Hur

Eiji Bandō

Eiji Bandō is a Japanese television entertainer, former baseball player and Youtuber. He pitched many innings in his high school career; the Japan High School Baseball Federation was afraid that he would injure his arm, so they set a new rematch rule in 1958. However, he pitched 18 innings in a 1958 quarterfinal game, which resulted in the first rematch in the National High School Baseball Championship, he didn't win. His record of 83 strikeouts in the tournament remains unbroken, he joined Chunichi Dragons but it is said that he didn't regain his pitching strength. He can't extend his elbow now. "Moeyo Dragons!" – 1974 Doyō Daisuki! 830 – 1987–1997 Sunday Dragons – 1983––present Unbelievable – 1997–1998 Sekai Fushigi Hakken! – 1986––present Magical Brain Power!! – 1990–1999, 2001

Terry Kirby

Terry Gayle Kirby is a former professional American football player who played ten seasons in the NFL from 1993 to 2002. A 6'1" running back from the University of Virginia, he is the brother of baseball player Wayne Kirby. Co Owner of Ultimate Sports Institute in Weston and now is a coach for the Weston Warriors. Kirby played high school football at Tabb High School in York County, leading his team to a state championship in 1987, he was selected to Parade's All-America team and the USA Today All-USA team after his senior year in 1988. As of 2014, he holds the Virginia High School League records for most 100-yard rushing games, most consecutive 100-yard games, career rushing attempts, he ranks fourth in career points scored, third in career touchdowns, second in career rushing yards with 7,428. In 2007, he was inducted into the Virginia High School League Hall of Fame. A standout high school basketball player, his 2,246 career points rank 17th on the all-time VHSL scoring list. Participating in the 1988 Arby's Classic, he holds the tournament records for most field-goal attempts and most field-goal attempts, tournament.

Kirby played running back for the University of Virginia from 1989-1992, finishing his career as the school's all-time leader in rushing yards, a mark that has since been eclipsed by Tiki Barber and Thomas Jones. He led the ACC in rushing in 1990 and 1992, he led his team in receptions his junior and senior seasons and ranks fifth in career all-purpose yards at UVA. Kirby was drafted by the Miami Dolphins in 1993, his best year as a pro came during the 1996 season as a member of the San Francisco 49ers, when he started 10 games and rushed for 559 yards on 134 carries. He finished his NFL career with 2,875 rushing 3,222 receiving yards and 43 total touchdowns, he completed 4 passes on 6 attempts in his career, with three touchdowns and no interceptions. Kirby broke his ankle in 2002 in a Week 7 contest against the San Diego Chargers, he left the game on a cart with his leg in an aircast. Following his NFL career, Kirby worked as a personal trainer. Kirby spends his summers working with children at Camp Wekeela.

He dedicates his time to teach special programs like tackle football and fitness and speed training