SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Rhode Island Red Monument

The Rhode Island Red Monument is a historic commemorative sculpture in Little Compton, Rhode Island in the village of Adamsville, Rhode Island commemorating the Rhode Island Red, Rhode Island's state bird. The Rhode Island Red Club of America is a chicken-breeder organization founded in 1898 which raised the funds for the monument, they placed it in Adamsville because the Rhode Island Red was first bred near the village in the 1850s. The sculpture was completed in 1925 by Henry L. Norton. In 2001, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. National Register of Historic Places listings in Newport County, Rhode Island Media related to Rhode Island Red Monument at Wikimedia Commons

Union County, Georgia

Union County is a county located in the U. S. state of Georgia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 21,356; the county seat is Blairsville. Its Sole commissioner is Lamar Paris, who has served since 2001. Union County was formed in 1832, named for the federal union. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 329 square miles, of which 322 square miles is land and 7.1 square miles is water. Brasstown Bald, the highest mountain in Georgia, rises in southeast Union County, straddling the Towns County line; the central and northern portion of Union County is located in the Hiwassee River sub-basin of the Middle Tennessee-Hiwassee basin, while the southwestern portion of the county is located in the Ocoee River sub-basin of the same larger watershed. A small portion of the county's southeastern corner is located in the Upper Chattahoochee River sub-basin of the ACF River Basin; this is where the source of the Chattahoochee is found. Cherokee County, North Carolina Clay County, North Carolina Towns County White County Lumpkin County Fannin County Chattahoochee National Forest As of the census of 2000, there were 17,289 people, 7,159 households, 5,211 families living in the county.

The population density was 54 people per square mile. There were 10,001 housing units at an average density of 31 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 97.94% White, 0.58% Black or African American, 0.25% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.24% from other races, 0.74% from two or more races. 0.88% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. Union County was mentioned as an "Extreme Whitopia", a place with a high concentration of white residents, in Rich Benjamin's book, Searching for Whitopia. There were 7,159 households out of which 24.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.90% were married couples living together, 7.10% had a female householder with no husband present, 27.20% were non-families. 24.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.00% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.77. In the county, the population was spread out with 20.00% under the age of 18, 6.60% from 18 to 24, 23.60% from 25 to 44, 28.20% from 45 to 64, 21.60% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 96.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.60 males. The median income for a household in the county was $31,893, the median income for a family was $39,776. Males had a median income of $29,127 versus $20,871 for females; the per capita income for the county was $18,845. About 9.30% of families and 12.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.10% of those under age 18 and 15.90% of those age 65 or over. As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 21,356 people, 9,116 households, 6,382 families living in the county; the population density was 66.3 inhabitants per square mile. There were 14,052 housing units at an average density of 43.6 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 96.8% white, 0.5% black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.9% from other races, 1.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 2.4% of the population. In terms of ancestry, 16.0% were English, 15.8% were Irish, 15.0% were American, 13.2% were German.

Of the 9,116 households, 22.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.8% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.0% were non-families, 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.75. The median age was 50.7 years. The median income for a household in the county was $41,298 and the median income for a family was $50,772. Males had a median income of $42,330 versus $29,176 for females; the per capita income for the county was $24,182. About 9.5% of families and 13.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.5% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over. Blairsville Suches Jones Creek Choestoe Ivy Log Canal Lake Owltown National Register of Historic Places listings in Union County, Georgia Union County Government Website City of Blairsville Government Website Blairsville and Union County Website Blairsville-Union County Chamber of Commerce Documents from Union County in the Digital Library of Georgia North Georgia News Website

Letheobia simonii

Letheobia simonii is a blind snake species endemic to the Middle East. No subspecies are recognized; the specific name, simoni, is in honor of German entomologist Hans Simon from Stuttgart. It is found in Israel and Syria; the type locality given is "Haiffa, Syriae". Mertens corrected this to Haiffa. R. simoni is flesh-colored, may attain a total length of about 20 cm. Scales are arranged in 20 rows around the body; the snout is prominent and pointed, with a sharp cutting edge, below which are located the nostrils. The head shields are granulated; the rostral is large, both the portion visible from above and the portion visible from below are longer than broad. The nasal cleft extends from the first upper labial to the nostril, close to the rostral; the preocular is as large as the ocular, but much smaller than the nasal, in contact with the second and third upper labials. The eye is not distinguishable; the prefrontal and the supraoculars are larger than the body scales. There are four upper labials.

The diameter of body goes 57 to 60 times in the total length. The tail is longer than broad, without a terminal spine. R. simoni prefers tropical dry shrubland and Mediterranean-type shrubby vegetation. The species R. simoni is classified as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Species are listed as such due to their wide distribution, presumed large population, or because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category. Year assessed: 2005. Boettger O. "Vorträge und Abhandlungen: Reptilien und Amphibien aus Syrien ". Bericht über die Senckenbergische Naturforschende Gesellschaft in Frankfurt am Main 1879: 57-84... Rhinotyphlops simonii at the Reptarium.cz Reptile Database. Accessed 19 August 2007