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Richard Codey

Richard James Codey is an American Democratic Party politician who served as the 53rd Governor of New Jersey from 2004 to 2006. He has served in the New Jersey Senate since 1982 and served as the President of the Senate from 2002 to 2010, he represents the 27th Legislative District, which covers the western portions of Essex County and the southeastern portion of Morris County. Codey is the longest-serving state legislator in New Jersey history, having served in the New Jersey Legislature continuously since January 8, 1974. Codey grew up in his family's funeral home in Orange, he attended Our Lady of the Valley High School and transferred to Orange High School, neither of them before switching to Oratory Preparatory School in Summit, from which he graduated. He went on to take over his father's job as a licensed funeral director; when his father, became the county coroner, Richard was drafted to help with death scene pickups. Codey remembered, "I was 14. You grow up quick." Codey has described himself as "100% Irish".

Codey left the funeral trade to try his hand in politics in 1973 when he was first elected to the State Assembly, with Eldridge Hawkins as his running mate. He served in the Assembly from 1974 to 1982. In 1981 he earned a bachelor's degree in education from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Codey was elected to the State Senate that same year and has since risen through the ranks to become Senate President, he first ascended to that post in 2002 to 2010. He serves in the Senate on the Legislative Services Commission, he has a hockey arena named in his honor known as South Mountain Arena in West Orange, New Jersey. Instead of running for a full term as Governor, Codey was re-elected to the New Jersey Senate in 2007. Codey represents the 27th Legislative District together with Assemblyman John F. McKeon, coincidentally the mayor of West Orange, a town in Essex County, New Jersey, where Senator Codey's family was raised. Codey and his family lived in West Orange until 2009; the other Assembly seat is occupied by Mila Jasey, elected to fill the seat in November 2007 after the resignation of Mims Hackett on September 8, 2007.

In September, 2006, during Menendez's re-election campaign for his U. S. Senate seat, it was revealed that Menendez was the subject of an ongoing federal criminal investigation; the situation resembles the situation faced by Robert Torricelli in his 2002 re-election campaign, where ethical problems and declining poll numbers led to Torricelli exiting the race, to be replaced as the Democratic candidate by former senator Frank Lautenberg. Political observers speculated that Codey could be tapped to fill the candidate's slot should Menendez decide to withdraw from the race. However, on November 7, 2006, Menendez was elected to a full term. Codey resigned as President of the Senate for one day in January 2008 in order to let retiring Sen. Bernard Kenny of Hoboken serve as Senate President on his last day in office. Senator Kenny had served as Senate Majority Leader under Codey. Kenny served as Senate President from January 7 to January 8, when Senator Codey was reelected to the Senate Presidency for the next legislative session.

In December 2016, Codey was one of several Catholic legislators who supported legislation legalizing assisted suicide. Environment and Energy Health, Human Services, Senior Citizens Following Governor Christine Todd Whitman's resignation in 2001 to become head of the EPA, Codey was one of three different senate presidents to serve as acting governor for the one-year period between Whitman's resignation and Jim McGreevey's inauguration in January 2002. DiFrancesco served as acting governor for all but the last week of this period, until his term as senate president ended; as attorney general, Farmer served as acting governor for ninety minutes, until the election of Bennett and Codey as co-presidents of the senate. The latter two divided the last week of the term between them, with Codey serving for three days, from January 12, 2002, to January 15, 2002, leading to a situation in which the state had five different people serving as governor during a period of eight days. Codey became acting governor again with the resignation of Jim McGreevey on November 15, 2004.

According to the New Jersey State Constitution at the time, in the event of a vacancy in the governor's office, the President of the State Senate takes on the additional position of acting governor until the next gubernatorial election. After taking over in 2004 Codey became popular with many New Jersey residents and considered a run for a full four-year term. However, U. S. Senator Jon Corzine's large number of endorsements as well as his large campaign war chest, funded by his great personal wealth, convinced Codey to announce on January 31, 2005 that he would step aside. Codey served as governor until Corzine was sworn in on January 17, 2006 following Corzine's victory in the November 8, 2005 elections; some had speculated that Codey could be a possible candidate for Corzine's vacant seat in the United States Senate, with Corzine appointing his own successor once he was sworn in as governor. However, Codey announced on November 2005 that he was not interested in the Senate seat. With the passage on November 8, 2005, of a constitutional amendment creating the position of lieutenant governor to take effect with the 2009 election, Codey became the last person to serve as governor and senate president.

On January 9, 2006, Codey became governor as a result of his signing legislation that provided that a person who serves as acting

The Beu Sisters

The Beu Sisters are a pop-rock girl group from the U. S. state of Florida, consisting of the sisters Candice and Danielle. They were born in New York state to parents who performed on Broadway and from an early age the girls sang together; the family moved to New Smyrna Beach, Florida, in 1989 and, by the end of the 1990s, they had formed an a cappella act. Desmond Child, a noted songwriter, noticed the sisters and helped them to sign a contract with S-Curve Records. In 2002, the Beu Sisters' first album, was released. Nine of the thirteen tracks on the album were co-written by them; the album includes. To promote their album, the Beu Sisters toured as the opening act on Kelly Clarkson and Clay Aiken's 2004 Independent Tour; the Beu Sisters can be heard on various soundtracks, including Disney productions the Ella Enchanted, Home on the Range, Disney Girlz Rock, Radio Disney Jingle Jams, Radio Disney Ultimate Jams, the Lizzie McGuire movie soundtrack and DisneyMania 2. They appeared on the Because of Winn-Dixie movie soundtrack and contributed to the movie How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days, featuring Kate Hudson and Matthew McConaughey, in 2003.

In 2012, the sisters created. It has many music videos dedicated to the songs on the album, such as "Definition of a Lady" and "Everything Will be Alright". A new song, "What Do You Do in the Summer", was released to radio in summer 2004; the group still performs at venues in Florida, although they took a break when Christie Beu gave birth to a boy in December 2004. At some point, Jillian Beu left the group. Beu Sisters on MySpace

Lorenzo Sabbatini

Lorenzo Sabbatini or Sabatini, Sabattini or Sabadini, sometimes referred to as Lorenzino da Bologna, was an Italian painter of the Mannerist period from Bologna. Sabbatini was born in Bologna and studied with Prospero Fontana, his teacher and collaborator, was a friend of Orazio Samacchini, his style was influenced by Giorgio Vasari and the Emilian mannerism of Parmigianino. By 1565 he was working with the studio of Giorgio Vasari in Florence, where was elected member of the Academy. Between 1566 and 1573 he was in Bologna, where he decorated the walls of several churches, including Santa Maria delle Grazie, Chiesa della Morte, San Martino Maggiore, San Giacomo Maggiore. In 1573 he moved to Rome to work under Vasari in the Cappella Paolina and Sala Regia of the Vatican, where he adopted many of the stylistic traits of Raphael's school and produced his most famous painting, The Triumph of Faith over Infidelity. After Vasari's death in 1574, Gregory XIII appointed Sabatini superintendent of works in the Vatican, a post he retained until his own premature death.

Sabbatini died in Rome in 1577. His students included the engraver Giulio di Antonio Bonasone and the painter of Flemish origin, Denis Calvaert. Holy Family and Saints, San Edigio, Bologna The Triumph of Faith over Infidelity Assumption of the Virgin Frescoes at the Malvasia Chapel The Four Evangelists The Four Teachers of the Church The Holy Family with Saints John and Michael Archangel, executed in part with Denys Calvaert Virgin and Child with Saint John, Paris Baglione, Giovanni Le Vite de’ Pittori, Scultori et Architetti. Dal Pontificato di Gregorio XII del 1572 in fino a’ tempi di Papa Urbano VIII nel 1642, p. 17 Sabbatini, Lorenzo. In: A New General Biographical Dictionary, by Hugh James Rose

InfoKora

INFOKORA is a football live score data provider headquartered in Cairo, Egypt. Formed in 2014 by Egyptian entrepreneur Haytham Amer, InfoKora analyses and distributes live football data for over 4,000 fixtures across 10 countries. InfoKora data is used in print and online media, sponsorship and professional performance analysis. In May 2016, the company published a beta version of their first product, 123kora.com, a live score website available in English and Arabic. The site covers most of the Middle East football leagues, including Egyptian Premier League, Saudi Professional League, QSL and Moroccan Botola; as of February 2016, the InfoKora Android app has reached 5,000 installs in the Google Play store

South Side Weekly

The South Side Weekly known as the Chicago Weekly News and Chicago Weekly, is an American alternative newspaper based in Woodlawn on the of South Side of Chicago. It was established in 1995 under the Chicago Weekly News title and covers arts and politics; the paper is produced by an all-volunteer editorial staff, composed of University of Chicago students. The paper is distributed around the South Side each Wednesday in the fall and winter, with breaks during April and December. Over the summer, the Weekly publishes monthly bi-monthly. Known as Chicago Weekly News until closing operations in the winter of 2002, a newly branded Chicago Weekly resumed operations in 2003, as a result of a co-publishing partnership with university alumni-founded Newcity. Under this new partnership, a copy of Newcity would come inserted in the middle of each Chicago Weekly issue. In 2013, the Chicago Weekly staff changed the name of the organization and newspaper to the South Side Weekly, began publishing independently of Newcity.

The paper covers arts and culture on the South Side of Chicago through coverage and criticism, follows South Side news stories that are ignored by mainstream Chicago media. It includes feature-length narrative journalism, a weekly calendar of cultural events; the South Side Weekly produces an annual showcase issue of the South Side's various neighborhoods called Best of the South Side. Each winter, the Weekly releases a housing guide; the issue features a variety of articles on topics including affordable housing, renter's rights and homelessness. Each spring, the Weekly releases an arts guide, featuring a print gallery comprising submitted art from South Side-based artists. Articles in this issue focus on both reviews and longform pieces. South Side Weekly

Sōdō Station

Sōdō Station is a train station in Shimotsuma, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. Sōdō Station is a station on the Kantō Railway’s Jōsō Line, is located 33.0 km from the official starting point of the line at Toride Station. The station has two opposed side platforms, connected to the station building by a level crossing. Sōdō Station was opened on 1 November 1913 as a station on the Jōsō Railroad, which became the Kanto Railway in 1965; the station building was rebuilt in July 1967. Former Chiyokawa Village Hall Chiyokawa Post Office Japan National Route 125 Kantō Railway Station Information