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Ridgecrest, California

Ridgecrest is a city in Kern County, United States, along U. S. Route 395 in the Indian Wells Valley in northeastern Kern County, adjacent to the Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, it was incorporated as a city in 1963. The population was 27,616 at the 2010 census, up from 24,927 at the 2000 census. Ridgecrest is surrounded by four mountain ranges, it is 82 miles from the Lancaster/Palmdale area, 110 miles from Bakersfield, 120 miles from San Bernardino, the three nearest major urban centers. Private air travel in and out of the city is provided through the Inyokern Airport. There are no scheduled commercial flights; the city has been near the epicenter of major earthquakes, including one in 1995 and a series of quakes in July 2019. The settlement began as a farming community called Crumville in 1912, honoring James and Robert Crum, local dairymen; the first post office opened in 1941. By 1943, Ridgecrest had grown to 196 residents. NOTS was established in November 1943. Ridgecrest incorporated in 1963.

During this era the growth of Ridgecrest was governed by the continuing needs of the high tech industries coupled to the Naval Station's programs for testing arms and guidance systems. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 21.4 square miles, of which 20.8 sq mi is land and 0.7 sq mi of it is water. Ridgecrest is located in Indian Wells Valley, a southern extension of Owens Valley, broken up by the volcanic Coso Range; the area, associated with the Eastern California Shear Zone, has in the past experienced numerous earthquake swarms, groups of several thousand quakes under magnitude 6.0 or so with no obvious mainshock. The 1995 Ridgecrest earthquake sequence started on August 17, when a magnitude 5.4 quake, centered 18 kilometers north of the town of Ridgecrest, shook the area and spawned over 2,500 aftershocks over the course of the following five weeks. On September 20, 1995, the second large quake struck the area: it measured magnitude 5.8, was at that time the largest earthquake to hit southern California since the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

On July 4–5, 2019, Ridgecrest was associated with a series of earthquakes, including the largest to affect the area in decades, measuring 7.1 magnitude. The epicenter was about 10 miles northeast of Ridgecrest; the earthquake sequence started with a 4.0 quake 11 kilometers southwest of Searles Valley at 10:33 A. M. a 6.4 quake struck 12 kilometers southwest of Searles Valley. Over 1,400 aftershocks struck Searles Ridgecrest. On July 5, 2019 at 8:19 P. M. the magnitude 7.1 earthquake occurred, with the epicenter 10 miles northeast of Ridgecrest. The weather in the Indian Wells Valley is predominantly influenced by its high desert location; the climate is characterized by hot days and cool nights with arid conditions prevailing throughout the summer months. The mean annual maximum temperature for the Ridgecrest area is 75 °F while the mean annual minimum temperature is 48 °F. There are wide annual temperature fluctuations that occur from a high of 119 °F to a low of 1 °F; the area is known to have wind as high as 75 mph on a sunny day.

Whenever winds exceed 30 mph dust devils and dust clouds form in the area. December is the coolest month with an average maximum temperature of 60 °F and an average minimum temperature of 30 °F; the all-time minimum temperature of 1 °F was recorded on December 23, 1963, January 7, 1973. Ridgecrest is a desert, with an average of less than 5 inches "equivalent rainfall" per year, which includes less than 2 inches of snow. July is the hottest month with an average maximum temperature of 103 °F and an average minimum temperature of 66 °F; the all-time maximum temperature of 119 °F was recorded on July 31, 1971. The 2010 United States Census reported that Ridgecrest had a population of 27,616; the population density was 1,289.5 people per square mile. The racial makeup of Ridgecrest was 21,387 White, 1,113 African American, 341 Native American, 1,209 Asian, 143 Pacific Islander, 1,836 from other races, 1,587 from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4,941 persons; the Census reported that 27,420 people lived in households, 109 lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, 87 were institutionalized.

There were 10,781 households, out of which 3,901 had children under the age of 18 living in them, 5,211 were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,352 had a female householder with no husband present, 609 had a male householder with no wife present. There were 681 unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, 64 same-sex married couples or partnerships. 2,978 households were made up of individuals and 1,001 had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54. There were 7,172 families; the population was spread out with 7,544 people under the age of 18, 2,654 people aged 18 to 24, 7,157 people aged 25 to 44, 6,844 people aged 45 to 64, 3,417 people who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.8 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 a

Whitton Baptist Church

Whitton Baptist Church is a church in Hounslow Road, Whitton in Richmond upon Thames, London. It is a member of the London Baptist Association; the two foundation stones set into the front wall of the church carry the date October 20, 1934. The present church building was opened on 6 April 1935; the new building, financed by the sale of St Margarets Baptist Church, replaced Whitton Gospel Hall which had opened in 1881. The church's halls were opened in September 1968 on the site of an old tennis court, they replaced two previous halls, one of, destroyed in a fire in 1966, the other on a site, now part of the church's car park. 1936 Rev. Walter G. Davis 1943 Rev. Albert Cassidy 1970 Rev. Derek Buckingham 1976 Rev. Barry Vendy 1984 Rev. Martin Smith 1998 Rev. Andy Gore 2014 Rev. Gordon Hindmarch Official website London Baptist Association Churches Together in Whitton

1903 Liverpool City Council election

Elections to Liverpool City Council were held on Monday 2 November 1903. Wavertree West was a new ward with 1 seat elected. All three seats in each of the Wavertree and West Derby wards were contested; this was the first Liverpool City Council election. Protestant candidates stood in four wards, Garston, Kirkdale and St. Domingo. Three of these wards, Kirkdale and St. Domingo returned Protestant councillors. Of the 38 seats up for election, 14 were not contested. After the election, the composition of the council was: In view of the significant number of uncontested seats, these statistics should be taken in that context. * - Retiring Councillor seeking re-election Comparisons are made with the 1900 election results, as the retiring councillors were elected in that year. The Council elected Councillor William Edward Willink as an Alderman for the new ward of Wavertree West on 9 November 1903Councillor Jacob Reuben Grant was elected by the Council as an alderman for the new ward of Old Swan on 9 November 1903.

The death of Alderman Herbert Campbell on 7 December 1903 was reported to the Council on 9 December 1903. His position was filled when Councillor Robert Alfred Hampson was elected as an alderman by the Council on 3 February 1904; the resignation of Alderman Dr. Thomas Clarke was reported to the Council on 9 November 1903. Councillor Edward Burns was elected as an alderman by the Council on 2 December 1903; the resignation of Alderman Alexander Murray Bligh was reported to the Council on 9 November 1903. Councillor John Lawrence was elected as an alderman on 2 December 1903. Councillor John Duncan was elected as an alderman. Following the death of Alderman John Lawrence, Councillor William Oulton was elected as an alderman on 1 June 1904. Alderman John Ellison died on 17 October 1904 Caused by the election by the Council of Councillor Jacob Reuben Grant as an alderman for the new ward of Old Swan on 9 November 1903. Caused by the resignation of Councillor Arthur Twiss Kemble, reported to the Council on 9 November 1903.

Caused by the election by the Council of Councillor William Edward Willink as an Alderman on 9 November 1903. Caused by the election to Alderman of Councillor Edward Burns. Caused by the election as alderman of Councillor John Lawrence Caused by the resignation of Councillor Dr. Charles Alexander Hill was reported to the Council on 6 January 1904 Caused by the resignation of Councillor John Brunswick, reported to the Council on 10 February 1904. Caused by the election as an alderman of Councillor Robert Alfred Hampson The Term of Office to expire 1 November 1905 Caused by the resignation of Councillor Julius Jacobs; the term of office to expire on 1 November 1905. Caused by Councillor John Duncan being elected as an alderman; the term of office to expire on 1 November 1906. Following the death of Alderman John Lawrence, Councillor William Oulton was elected as an alderman. Councillor Alexander Allan Paton died 8 September 1903 Caused by the resignation of Councillor Thomas Utley, reported to the Council on 5 October 1904.

Liverpool City Council Liverpool Town Council elections 1835 - 1879 Liverpool City Council elections 1880–present Mayors and Lord Mayors of Liverpool 1207 to present History of local government in England