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Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel known as Cashel of the Kings and St. Patrick's Rock, is a historic site located at Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland. According to local legends, the Rock of Cashel originated in the Devil's Bit, a mountain 20 miles north of Cashel when St. Patrick banished Satan from a cave, resulting in the Rock's landing in Cashel. Cashel is reputed to be the site of the conversion of the King of Munster by St. Patrick in the 5th century; the Rock of Cashel was the traditional seat of the kings of Munster for several hundred years prior to the Norman invasion. In 1101, the King of Munster, Muirchertach Ua Briain, donated his fortress on the Rock to the Church; the picturesque complex has a character of its own and is one of the most remarkable collections of Celtic art and medieval architecture to be found anywhere in Europe. Few remnants of the early structures survive; the oldest and tallest of the buildings is the well preserved round tower, dating from c.1100. Its entrance is 12 feet from the ground, necessitated by a shallow foundation typical of round towers.

The tower was built using the dry stone method. Modern conservationists have filled in some of the tower with mortar for safety reasons. Cormac's Chapel, the chapel of King Cormac Mac Carthaigh, was begun in 1127 and consecrated in 1134, it is a sophisticated structure, with vaulted ceilings and wide arches, drawing on contemporary European architecture and infusing unique native elements. The Irish Abbot of Regensburg, Dirmicius of Regensburg, sent two of his carpenters to help in the work and the twin towers on either side of the junction of the nave and chancel are suggestive of their Germanic influence, as this feature is otherwise unknown in Ireland. Other notable features of the building include interior and exterior arcading, a barrel-vaulted roof, a carved tympanum over both doorways, the magnificent north doorway and chancel arch and the oldest stairs in Ireland, it contains one of the best-preserved Irish frescoes from this time period. The Chapel was constructed of sandstone which has become waterlogged over the centuries damaging the interior frescoes.

Restoration and preservation required the chapel be enclosed in a rain-proof structure with interior dehumidifiers to dry out the stone. It is now open for limited tours to the public; the Cathedral, built between 1235 and 1270, is an aisleless building of cruciform plan, having a central tower and terminating westwards in a massive residential castle. The Hall of the Vicars Choral was built in the 15th century; the vicars choral were laymen appointed to assist in chanting the cathedral services. At Cashel, there were eight vicars choral with their own seal; this was reduced to five honorary vicars choral who appointed singing-men as their deputies, a practice which continued until 1836. The restoration of the Hall was undertaken by the Office of Public Works as a project in connection with the European Architectural Heritage Year, 1975. Through it visitors now enter the site. In 1647, during the Irish Confederate Wars, Cashel was sacked by English Parliamentarian troops under Murrough O'Brien, 1st Earl of Inchiquin.

The Irish Confederate troops there were massacred, as were the Catholic clergy, including Theobald Stapleton. Inchiquin's troops destroyed many important religious artefacts. In 1749, the main cathedral roof was removed by the Anglican Archbishop of Cashel. Today, what remains of the Rock of Cashel has become a tourist attraction. Price's decision to remove the roof on what had been called the jewel among Irish church buildings was criticised before and since. Queen Elizabeth II visited the Rock of Cashel during her 2011 visit to Ireland; the entire plateau on which the buildings and graveyard lie is walled. In the grounds around the buildings an extensive graveyard includes a number of high crosses. Scully's Cross, one of the largest and most famous high crosses here constructed in 1867 to commemorate the Scully family, was destroyed in 1976 when lightning struck a metal rod that ran the length of the cross; the remains of the top of the cross now lie at the base of the cross adjacent to the rock wall.

Malcolm Hamilton Eóganachta Kings of Munster Kings of Desmond Synod of Cashel Hore Abbey National monuments of Ireland Rock of Cashel on Heritage Ireland site

Pantera RX6

The Pantera RX6 is a Rallycross Supercar produced by MJP Racing. Production of the RX6 began in 2018 for a new one-make class of rallycross racing known as the Titan class, making the RX6 the second rallycross car designed for a new class, after the RX2 car designed for the RX2 class by Olsbergs MSE; the car was designed to combat the increasing costs of maintaining a supercar in Rallycross by supplying an affordable, easy to maintain car, race ready. The car has been designed to make it easier for female and disabled drivers to race with several adaptation options. At present the Pantera RX6 uses a 2.3L EcoBoost engine from a sixth generation Ford Mustang, tuned to be suited to rallycross by racing specialists Pipo Moteurs, with bespoke drivetrain from Unic Transmissions. As the Pantera RX6 is designed to compete in a one-make racing class, there is only one type of engine at present with no variants; as of early-2019, the following body kits are compatible with the Pantera RX6: At the car's launch conference in Vienna in 2018, the car's creator, Max Pucher, emphasised the car's key feature being its ease of maintenance, stating that each car could last'two to three seasons depending on use', before requiring a'full rebuild after 3000km'.

Since the car has been designed for easy maintenance, certain limits were added to the car, such as the ECU being locked to prevent modification of the car's engine mapping. In a interview, Pucher continued that these limitations and settings will allow a race team'to service one car per race weekend with one chief and a junior mechanic with no need for race, engine or electronics engineers', as technical support is available at all Titans-RX races and provided as a service by the racing series; as part of the Titans-RX support service, spare parts will be available from all MJP Racing service trucks, excluding body kits, with wheels and fuel being supplied at each race event, covered by an initial fee at the start of the Titans-RX Season. GRC Rallycross Max Pucher MJP Racing Team Austria TCR Touring Car

Dreros inscription

The Dreros inscription is the earliest surviving inscribed law from ancient Greece. It was discovered in Dreros, an ancient settlement on the island of Crete, in 1936, first published by Pierre Demargne and Henri van Effenterre in 1937. In 1936, thirteen stones inscribed with archaic letters were discovered in a Hellenistic cistern in Dreros; these stones came from the east wall of the temple of Apollo Delphinios, make up eight inscriptions or fragments of inscriptions. This display of laws in public in sanctuaries, is a frequent feature of archaic Cretan law; the Dreros inscription is the longest of these eight laws. The Dreros law is inscribed on a block of grey schist; the block is inscribed with irregular letters. L. H. Jeffery describes the lettering as "tall and straggling", notes that it resembles the lettering on the Dedication of Nikandre. There are four full lines of text; the first three full lines are written in boustrophedon fashion – i.e. alternating between right-left and left-right.

The fourth line begins a new clause, again begins from the right – this is the first known example of this system of paragraphing in a Greek text. The text dates to the second half of the seventh century BC, is the oldest surviving Greek law; the law begins with an invocation to a god. It rules that anyone who holds the office of kosmos cannot hold it again for ten years after their term of office ends, says that anyone who breaks the law is to be fined and deprived of civic rights; the final clause of the law lists the kosmos and the Twenty of the Polis as taking an oath to confirm the law. This restriction on holding the office of kosmos is paralleled in an inscription from Gortyn, though there the restriction on holding the office was only to once every three years. Ehrenberg, Victor. "An Early Source of Polis-Constitution". The Classical Quarterly. 37. Jeffery, L. H.. The Local Scripts of Archaic Greece: A Study of the Origin of the Greek Alphabet and its Development from the Eighth to the Fifth Centuries B.

C. Oxford: Oxford University Press. McDonald, William A.. "Note on a Fragment of an Archaic Inscription from Dreros". Hesperia: The Journal of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. 25. Osborne, Robin. Greece in the Making: 1200–479 BC. London: Routledge. Thomas, Rosalind. "Written in Stone? Liberty, Equality and the Codification of Law". Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies. 40. Van Effenterre, Henri. "Recherches à Dréros, II: Les inscriptions archaïques". Bulletin de correspondance hellénique. 61. Whitley, James. "Cretan Laws and Cretan Literacy". American Journal of Archaeology. 101

Snehapoorvam Anna

Snehapoorvam Anna is a 2000 Malayalam romantic film starring Vaibhavi Merchant and Innocent. It was directed by Sangeeth Sivan; the film concerns the relationship between his daughter. Anna is her father's only daughter, he has the dream of marrying her to someone according to his wish. However, she falls in love with a boy and this shakes the relationship between the daughter and father. Vaibhavi Merchant as Anna Subil Surendran as Jomon Innocent as Anna's Father Cochin Haneefa as Abu Uncle Bindu Panicker as Fousi Aunty Captain Raju as Jomon's Father Reena as Jomon's Mother Nandhu as College Student Sudheesh as College Student Sandra Jose as College Student The film score and soundtrack of the film were composed by Raju Singh, with lyrics by Shibu Chakravarthy; the film had eight songs. "Aaru nee en hridayakavaadam" - M. G. Sreekumar "Akkare Veettil Anthonichanu" - M. G. Sreekumar, Biju Narayanan, Sujatha "Karukappulmettile" - M. G. Sreekumar, Sujatha "Maaleyam Maarilezhum" - Sreenivas, K. S. Chithra "Maanthalirin" - M. G. Sreekumar, K. S. Chithra " Maanthalirin " - K. J. Yesudas, Raju Singh "Ooadaan" - Biju Narayanan, Chorus "Ormayil Ennormayil " - Sujatha Mohan Snehapoorvam Anna on IMDb

The Eternity Man

The Eternity Man is a chamber opera in one act and seven scenes by the Australian composer Jonathan Mills to a libretto by Dorothy Porter. It deals with the life of Arthur Stace, known as "The Eternity Man" because he chalked the word "Eternity" about 500,000 times in over 35 years on Sydney's walls and footpaths; the opera is written for four voices. These include the voice of Stace himself and three female characters who represent alternatively Stace's sister, Myrtle. A performance lasts for about 70 minutes; the work was commissioned by and premiered at London's Almeida Theatre on 23 July 2003, conducted by Stuart Stratford, production by Benedict Andrews, with singers Richard Jackson, Tara Harrison, Claire McCaldin and Andee-Louise Hippolite. The work had one Australian season, at the Sydney Festival in January 2005; that performance at the Sydney Opera House Studio, conducted by Richard Gill included the singers Grant Smith, Christa Hughes, Belinda Montgomery, Inara Molinari. In 2008 director Julien Temple adapted the work into a 64-minute film with funding from the ABC and Britain's Channel 4.

It was first shown in June 2008 at the Sydney Film Festival, subsequently at film festivals in Melbourne, Athens, Vancouver, Mar del Plata. In 2008 it won the ATOM Award for Best Experimental Film, the Gold Cinematography Award and the Judges Award for Best Work of the Year at the Queensland Australian Cinematography Awards, it was named the Best Performing Arts program at the international 2009 Rose d'Or. The film screened on the ABC on 18 January 2009; the cast includes Christa Hughes. Details of the score at Boosey & Hawkes The Eternity Man, ABC program notes The Eternity Man on IMDb TV review and images Film official home page

Tvoje lice zvuči poznato (Serbian season 1)

Tvoje lice zvuči poznato 1 was the first season of the Serbian reality contest based on the international franchise Your Face Sounds Familiar. It broadcast between October 12 and December 28, 2013; the judging panel consisted of late night talk show host Ivan Ivanović, singer and vocal coach Marija Mihajlović, actress Katarina Radivojević and a different guest judge each week. The series was hosted by actor Petar Strugar; the show's winner was singer Ana Kokić. The show challenges celebrities to perform as different iconic music artists every week, which are chosen by the show's "Randomiser", they are judged by the panel of celebrity judges including Ivan Ivanović, Katarina Radivojević and Marija Mihajlović. Each week, one celebrity guest judge joins Ivan and Marija to make up the complete judging panel. Marija Mihajlović is a voice coach; each celebrity gets transformed into a different singer each week and performs an iconic song and dance routine well known by that particular singer. The'randomiser' can choose any older or younger artist available in the machine, or a singer of the opposite sex, or a deceased singer.

Winner of each episode wins €1000, winner of whole show wins €25000. All money goes to charity of winner's own choice; the show lasts 12 weeks. The contestants are awarded points from the judges based on their dance routines. Judges give points from 2 to 12, with the exception of 11. After that, each contestant gives 5 points to a fellow contestant of their choice. In week 11 and in week 12, viewers vote via text messages. In week 11, all judges points from past weeks and from semi-final are made into points from 2 to 12. Contestants with most judges points will get 12 points, second placed will get 10, third placed 9 and 10th placed will get only 2 points. After that, public votes will be made into points from 2 to 12, again with the exception of 11. Contestant with most public votes will get 12 points, second placed 10 and 10th placed will get only 2. All those points will be summed up and five contestants with most points will go to final week. In final week, judges will not vote - contestant with most public vote will win the show.

Guest Judge: Dragana Mirković Winner: Tamara DragičevićBonus pointsŽeljko Šašić gave five points to Knez Sara Jovanović gave five points to Tamara Dragičević Goca Tržan gave five points to Sneki Tamara Dragičević gave five points to Boris Milivojević Knez gave five points to Wikluh Sky Aleksa Jelić gave five points to Tamara Dragičević Sneki gave five points to Goca Tržan Boris Milivojević gave five points to Ana Kokić Ana Kokić gave five points to Wikluh Sky Wikluh Sky gave five points to Knez Guest Judge: Severina Winner: Ana KokićBonus pointsAna gave five points to Sara Wikluh Sky gave five points to Ana Knez gave five points to Goca Tamara gave five points to Aleksa Željko gave five points to Ana Aleksa gave five points to Ana Goca gave five points to Knez Boris gave five points to Sneki Sara gave five points to Ana Sneki gave five points to Boris Guest Judge: Miroslav Ilić Winner: Boris MilivojevićBonus pointsKnez gave five points to Željko Wikluh Sky gave five points to Sneki Sneki gave five points to Aleksa Aleksa gave five points to Sneki Goca gave five points to Željko Tamara gave five points to Ana Ana gave five points to Boris Sara gave five points to Željko Željko gave five points to Boris Boris gave five points to Aleksa Guest Judge: Savo Milošević Winner: Željko ŠašićBonus pointsSara gave five points to Goca Boris gave five points to Knez Sneki gave five points to Wikluh Sky Željko gave five points to Sneki Aleksa gave five points to Sara Ana gave five points to Željko Tamara gave five points to Sara Goca gave five points to Ana Wikluh Sky gave five points to Knez Knez gave five points to Wikluh Sky Guest Judge: Marija Šerifović Winner: SnekiBonus pointsSneki gave five points to Ana Tamara gave five points to Sneki Wikluh Sky gave five points to Željko Goca gave five points to Aleksa Aleksa gave five points to Wikluh Sky Boris gave five points to Sneki Sara gave five points to Sneki Željko gave five points to Sara Ana gave five points to Sneki Knez gave five points to Boris Guest Judge: Bora Đorđević Winner: Aleksa JelićBonus points Tamara gave five points to Aleksa Boris gave five points to Goca Aleksa gave five points to Goca Ana gave five points to Aleksa Sneki gave five points to Željko Knez gave five points to Željko Željko gave five points to Goca Wikluh Sky gave five points to Boris Sara gave five points to Aleksa Goca gave five points to Sara Guest Judge: Tony Cetinski Winner: Wikluh SkyBonus points Tamara gave five points to Wikluh Sky Sneki gave five points to Tamara Boris gave five points to Željko Knez gave five points to Wikluh Sky Sara gave five points to Wikluh Sky Aleksa gave five points to Knez Wikluh Sky gave five points to Aleksa Željko gave five points to Sneki Ana gave five points to Goca Goca gave five points to Wikluh Sky Guest Judge: Sergej Trifunović Winner: Goca TržanBonus points Goca gave five points to Boris Wikluh Sky gave five points to Goca Sara gave five points to Boris Ana gave five points to Boris Sneki gave five points to Sara Željko gave five points to Tamara Boris gave five points to Sara Knez gave five points to Goca Aleksa gave five points to Goca Tamara gave five points to Goca Guest Judge: Nataša Bekvalac Winner: KnezBonus pointsBoris gave five point to Tamara Sneki gave five point to Željko Ana gave five point to Knez Tamara gave five point to Željko Sara gave five point to Knez Aleksa gave five point to Boris Goca gave five point to Knez Knez gave five point to Aleksa Željko gave five point to Knez Wikluh Sky gave five point to Knez Guest Judge: Haris Džin