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Sam Jaffe

Shalom "Sam" Jaffe was an American actor, teacher and engineer. In 1951, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performance in The Asphalt Jungle and appeared in other classic films such as Ben-Hur and The Day the Earth Stood Still, he is remembered for other outstanding performances such as the title role in Gunga Din and the High Lama in Lost Horizon. Jaffe was born to Barnett Jaffe in New York City, New York, his mother was a Yiddish actress in Odessa, prior to moving to the United States. He was the youngest of four children; as a child, he appeared in Yiddish theater productions with his mother, who after moving to the United States became a prominent actress and vaudeville star. He graduated from Townsend Harris High School and studied engineering at City College of New York, graduating in 1912, he attended Columbia University for graduate studies. He worked for several years as a teacher, dean, of mathematics at the Bronx Cultural Institute, a college preparatory school, before returning to acting in 1915.

As a young man, he lived in Greenwich Village in the same apartment building as a young John Huston. The two men remained so for life. Jaffe was to star in two of Huston's films: The Asphalt Jungle and The Barbarian and the Geisha. Jaffe's closest friends included Zero Mostel, Edward G. Robinson, Ray Bradbury, Igor Stravinsky. In 1923 he appeared in the Broadway premiere of God of Vengeance as Reb Ali; the production became notorious after the cast and theatre owner were indicted and found guilty on charges of indecency in May 1923. Jaffe began to work in film in 1934, rising to prominence with his first role as the mad Tsar Peter III in The Scarlet Empress. In 1938, Jaffe was forty-seven years old. Jaffe was blacklisted by the Hollywood movie studio bosses during the 1950s for being a communist sympathizer. Despite this, he was hired first by Robert Wise for The Day the Earth Stood Still and by director William Wyler for his role in the 1959 Academy Award-winning version of Ben-Hur. Jaffe co-starred in the ABC television series, Ben Casey as Dr. David Zorba from 1961 to 1965 alongside Vince Edwards.

He made many guest-starring roles on other series, including Batman as Mr. Zoltan Zorba, the Western Alias Smith and Jones. In 1975, he co-starred as a retired doctor, murdered by Janet Leigh in the Columbo episode "Forgotten Lady", he appeared with an all-star cast in the TV pilot film of Rod Serling's Night Gallery and as Emperor Norton in one episode of Bonanza. Jaffe was married to American operatic soprano and musical comedy star Lillian Taiz from 1926 until her death from cancer in 1941. In 1956, he married actress Bettye Ackerman, 33 years his junior, with whom he co-starred in Ben Casey, she died on November 20, 2006. He had no children from either marriage. A Democrat, Jaffe supported the campaign of Adlai Stevenson II during the 1952 presidential election. Jaffe died of cancer in Beverly California two weeks after his 93rd birthday, he was cremated at the Pasadena Crematory in Altadena and his ashes were given to his surviving wife, which were buried with her at Williston Cemetery in Williston, South Carolina, upon her death in 2006.

Works by or about Sam Jaffe at Internet Archive Sam Jaffe at Find a Grave Sam Jaffe on IMDb Sam Jaffe at the TCM Movie Database Sam Jaffe at the Internet Broadway Database Sam Jaffe at Internet Off-Broadway Database

Cossack knot

The Cossack knot is a loop that places a loop in the end of the rope. It is quite common in Russia and is used instead of the bowline; the knot is not mentioned in The Ashley Book of Knots but in its Russian equivalent, the book "Морские узлы" by Lev Skryagin. With slippage the knot is known as Kalmyk loop. Скрягин Л. Н. Морские узлы — Москва, Транспорт, 1982 Морские узлы: Издательство «Транспорт».

SaferSurf

SaferSurf is a software product for anonymous internet surfing. Aside from offering web anonymity, it has several other features, such as a geolocation proxy service bypassing country restrictions. SaferSurf doesn't need a local installation. SaferSurf was created and developed by a team from Nutzwerk, a German software company headquartered in Leipzig developing internet technologies, it obtained the TÜV certification in 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009. It was tested for a wide range of false alarms. SaferSurf provides various features: Malware checking: Potentially dangerous online enquiries are rooted via the SaferSurf proxy server that examines all data for malware before they reach the computer. If dangerous or undesirable data are detected, they are removed from the data stream on the internet. Protection of anonymity: SaferSurf calls up the websites on the user's behalf, making it impossible to store the user's IP address. Whenever the user goes from one website to another, SaferSurf deletes the referrer information from the data stream.

It provides a list of known "eavesdroppers". Spam and phishing e-mail protection Faster internet access: High-speed servers with 1 Gbit connections. Access to blocked websites: the Unblock Stick lets the user bypass firewalls and other net restrictions without needing administrative rights on the machine; when private mode is set, the internet browser will not store traces of the user's activity. Setting the maximum lifespan of cookies Unblocking videos on YouTube and other media portals: SaferSurf's different proxy locations bypass country restrictions, while the websites maintain their full functionality because of special SSL-Proxy-Server that loads the website directly using an encrypted connection; the geolocation function allows the user to adopt the IP of a specific country. Not storing the user's IP address: That way SaferSurf can't link the user with the browsed content; when SaferSurf was released in 2003, the media praised its speed. Hamburger Abendblatt wrote: "Surf up to ten times faster, virus-free:, the service offered by the company Nutzwerk.

With a slow modem connection, the data reaches its goal faster" Pocket PC magazine wrote: "Indeed, with the assistance of SaferSurf Speed web pages display up to three times faster SaferSurf Speed works independently from any ISP and internet connection you use."Other media gave more weight to anonymity and protection. The Bild's computer magazine tested several web anonymity programs and cited "reliable anonymization" among the advantages of SaferSurf. In the same year, Macworld praised its spam-filtering service. Official website