Scotia Square

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Scotia Square
Scotia Square Complex, Halifax, Nova Scotia.jpg
General information
Status Complete
Type Mixed-use
Architectural style Brutalist/Modern
Location 5201 Duke Street
Halifax, Nova Scotia
B3J 1N9
Opened 1969
Landlord Crombie REIT

Scotia Square is a commercial development in Downtown Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. It was built in the late sixties to mid seventies and is managed by Crombie REIT. It is connected to the Downtown Halifax Link and serves as a major Halifax Transit bus terminal in Halifax.

History[edit]

Site of First Court House and Legislative Assembly Plaque, Royal Nova Scotia Historical Society, Scotia Square, Halifax, Nova Scotia

Scotia Square was constructed in 1967, a neighbourhood was previously located where the complex now stands with the Cogswell Interchange. Scotia Square had previous tenants such as Famous Players theatre and a Woolco department store. The food court was also known as the Port of Call.[1]

Location and layout[edit]

Interior of Scotia Square (fountain removed in 2012)

Scotia Square consists of a mall, a hotel, and a number of office towers connected to each other and to other buildings by pedways and tunnels. In the centre of the complex is Scotia Square Mall and a large food court servicing the adjoinging office buildings. The complex is adjacent to the Cogswell Interchange, and it fronts on Duke Street to the south, Barrington Street to the east, and Albemarle Street (formerly Market Street) to the west.

Buildings[edit]

Map of Scotia Square

Food court[edit]

The Scotia Square Mall food court was renovated in 2014 and named The Mix by Crombie REIT. The court features 14 different food vendors ranging from large fast food chains like McDonald's to locally owned vendors like Mama Gratti's Deli & Market. Various upgrades to seating during the renovation allows large foot traffic during lunchtime rushes during the week. Being based toward servicing those working downtown the hours of operation of most food court tenants are 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.[10]

Pedways and tunnels[edit]

  • Pedway connecting Brunswick Street to the Scotia Square Parkade, and the west parkade stairwell. Passes over Albemarle Street (formerly Market Street).[3][11]
  • Pedway connecting the northwest corner of Scotia Square Parkade (topmost level) to Brunswick Place (formerly called Trade Mart building), which is located beside Scotia Square Parkade, on the north side of Cogswell Street.[3][11]
  • Tunnel connecting mall to World Trade and Convention Centre, as well as the Scotiabank Centre (formerly Halifax Metro Centre). Passes under Duke Street.[3][11]
  • Three-level pedway going from Barrington & Duke Towers to a stairwell, which leads to parking and the mall. The middle level of this pedway joins up to the Brunswick Street Pedway mentioned above.[3][11]
  • Pedway going from Scotia Square Mall, over Barrington Street, and into Barrington Place Shops. From there one can go via pedway to Purdy's Wharf, Casino Nova Scotia, the CIBC Building, and the TD Tower.[3][11]

Future development[edit]

An expansion of the Scotia Square shopping centre, along Barrington Street, is under construction. It was designed by DSRA Architects of Halifax.[12] The three-storey development will include street-level commercial, as well as office and retail above. The changes would bring the site into better agreement with municipal design guidelines mandating more pedestrian-oriented districts.[13]

Another future development, Westhill on Duke, is a proposed for the southwest corner of the complex on the corner of Duke Street and Albemarle Street. It comprises an 18-storey building with retail, residential, and office space with a more pedestrian-friendly streetscape than the current blank wall.[14] Architects involved on the project are DSRA Architects and Zeidler Partnership Architects.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Spacing Atlantic Scotia Square History". Spacing Atlantic. 
  2. ^ "Barrington Place Shops". Halifax Developments. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Sandalack, Beverly (1999). Urban Structure, Halifax: An Urban Design Approach. Halifax: TUNS Press. 
  4. ^ "Barrington Tower". Halifax Developments. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  5. ^ "Brunswick Place". Halifax Developments. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "Cogswell Tower". Halifax Developments. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  7. ^ "Duke Tower". Halifax Developments. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  8. ^ "Delta Halifax". Delta Hotels. Retrieved 4 June 2014. 
  9. ^ "Delta Barrington". Delta Hotels. 
  10. ^ "Scotia Square Visitor Information". scotiasquare.com. Retrieved 3 June 2015. 
  11. ^ a b c d e "Downtown Halifax Link" (PDF). Trade Centre Limited. 
  12. ^ Crombie REIT. "HRM Planning Application" (PDF). Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  13. ^ Crombie REIT. "HRM Substantive Site Plan Approval Pre-Application: SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS" (PDF). Retrieved 4 February 2014. 
  14. ^ "Scotia Square - Westhill on Duke Development" (PDF). zeidler DSRA JV. 29 June 2016. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°39′0.00″N 63°34′38.13″W / 44.6500000°N 63.5772583°W / 44.6500000; -63.5772583