Shikigami

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Abe no Seimei and his shikigami (bottom right) before an assembly of god-like demon spirits

Shikigami (式神, also read as Shiki-no-kami, 式の神) is the term for a being from Japanese folklore. It is thought to be some sort of kami, represented by a small ghost,[1] the belief of shikigami originates from Onmyōdō.

Description[edit]

Shikigami are conjured beings, made alive through a complex conjuring ceremony, their power is connected to the spiritual force of their master, where if the invoker is well introduced and has lots of experience, their shiki can possess animals and even people and manipulate them, but if the invoker is careless, their shikigami may get out of control in time, gaining its own will and consciousness, and can even raid its own master and kill them in revenge. Usually shikigami are conjured to exercise risky orders for their masters, such as spying, stealing and enemy tracking. Shikigami are said to be invisible most of the time, but they can be made visible by banning them into small, folded and artfully cut paper manikins. There are also shikigami that can show themselves as animals or birds.[1][2][3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Inoue, Nobutaka (2002). An Encyclopedia of Shinto. Tokyo: Kokugakuin University. pp. 84–90. ISBN 4905853087. 
  2. ^ Avant, G. Rodney (2005). A Mythological Reference. Bloomington, Indiana: AuthorHouse. p. 356. ISBN 1418492787. 
  3. ^ Drazen, Patrick (2011). A Gathering of Spirits: Japan's Ghost Story Tradition: from Folklore and Kabuki to Anime and Manga. Bloomington, Indiana: Iuniverse. p. 224. ISBN 1462029426.