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Stone County, Arkansas

Stone County is located in the Ozark Mountains in the U. S. state of Arkansas. The county is named for rocky area terrain of the Ozarks. Created as Arkansas's 74th county on April 21, 1873, Stone County has two incorporated cities: Mountain View, the county seat and most populous city, Fifty-Six; the county is the site of numerous unincorporated communities and ghost towns. Most of the county is sparsely populated forested Ozark hills; the remainder of the county is used for poultry and timber production. The White River runs along the eastern boundary of Stone County; the county contains six protected areas in addition to the Ozark National Forest: Blanchard Springs Caverns within the Ozark National Forest, two Natural Areas, two Wildlife Management Areas and the Ozark Folk Center, which preserves and interprets Ozark cultural heritage traditional mountain folk music and crafts. Other features such as log cabins, one-room school houses, community centers, museums, as well as annual cultural events, preserve the history and culture of Stone County.

Stone County occupies 609.43 square miles and contained a population of 12,394 people in 5,325 households as of the 2010 Census, ranking it 57th in both size and population among the state's 75 counties. Stone County is located in one of the six ecoregions of Arkansas; the Ozarks are a mountainous subdivision of the U. S. Interior Highlands, Stone County contains the Springfield Plateau, Salem Plateau, the steeper Boston Mountains subsets; the county is split along an east-west line near Mountain View, the centrally located county seat, with areas north within the Springfield Plateau, areas south within the Boston Mountains. Areas along the White River, which forms the county's northeastern boundary, are dissected bluffs of the Salem Plateau rather than riparian floodplains. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 609.43 square miles, of which 606.59 square miles is land and 2.84 square miles is water. The county is located 105 miles north of Little Rock, 151 miles northwest of Memphis, 278 miles southwest of St. Louis, Missouri.

Stone County is surrounded by three Ozark counties, Searcy County to the west, Baxter County to the northwest, Izard County to the northeast, three border counties with the Arkansas River Valley, Van Buren County to the southwest, Cleburne County to the south, Independence County to the east. Ozark National Forest As of the 2010 census, there were 12,394 people, 5,325 households, 3,590 families residing in the county; the population density was 20 people per square mile. There were 6,712 housing units at an average density of 11 per square mile; the racial makeup of the county was 96.8% White, 0.1% Black or African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 0.4% from other races, 1.6% from two or more races. 1.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 5,325 households out of which 26.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.4% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 32.6% were non-families.

28.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 36.6% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.81. In the county, the population was spread out with 20.6% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 19.4% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, 22.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.2 years. For every 100 females there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males. The median income for a household in the county was $30,380, the median income for a family was $36,765. Males had a median income of $28,258 versus $25,341 for females; the per capita income for the county was $16,090. About 16.6% of families and 23.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.7% of those under age 18 and 20.6% of those age 65 or over. As of the 2000 census, there were 11,499 people, 4,768 households, 3,461 families residing in the county; the population density was 19 people per square mile.

There were 5,715 housing units at an average density of 9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the county was 97.27% White, 0.08% Black or African American, 0.77% Native American, 0.05% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.15% from other races, 1.64% from two or more races. 1.08% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 4,768 households out of which 26.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.30% were married couples living together, 7.10% had a female householder with no husband present, 27.40% were non-families. 24.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.20% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.82. In the county, the population was spread out with 22.20% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 23.60% from 25 to 44, 28.50% from 45 to 64, 18.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 96.90 males.

For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.30 males. The median income for a household in the county was $22,209, the median income for a family was $28,009. Males had a median income of $20,904 versus $16,118 for females; the per capita income for the county was $14,134. About 14.10%

Acorn Antiques

Acorn Antiques is a parodic soap opera written by British comedian Victoria Wood as a regular feature in the two seasons of Victoria Wood as Seen on TV, which ran from 1985 to 1987. It was turned into a musical by Wood, opening in 2005. Wood wrote Acorn Antiques as a weekly slot in her sketch shows Victoria Wood as Seen on TV, she based it on the long-running ATV/Central serial Crossroads, radio soap Waggoners' Walk. Swipes were taken at current soaps such as EastEnders and Coronation Street with their apparent low production values, wobbly sets, appalling dialogue and wildly improbable plots, its premise—the lives and loves of the staff of an antiques shop in a fictional English town called Manchesterford—hardly reflects the ambitious and implausible storylines, which lampooned the staples of soap operas: love triangles, sudden deaths and siblings reunited. It satirised the shortcomings of long-running dramas produced on small budgets with its little artificial-looking set, missed cues, crude camera work and hasty scripts.

A lack of continuity is seen in distinct lapses where storylines are introduced and dropped between episodes and character development is forgotten. One episode, for example, is introduced as reflecting the current interest in health fads with a plot where the antiques shop is merged into a "Leisure centre and sunbed centre", never to be mentioned again; this story-line reflected changes in the Crossroads storyline in the mid-1980s as a leisure centre opened at the motel where the serial was set. The deliberately haphazard opening and end credits, together with its tinny title music lampooned Crossroads; the opening sequence was updated for the second series, with a reworking of the theme tune and shots of Miss Babs, one of the leading characters, driving to Acorn Antiques in the firm's van. This too was reflective of changes in the Crossroads series at the time, as the show gained its first opening title sequence. Another nod to changes in the mid-1980s Crossroads opening sequence was the inclusion in one episode of Acorn Antiques of vertical window blinds, with the show's title written on them.

Predictably, the Acorn Antiques version had to be pushed aside by hand. The most comical element of Acorn Antiques were the missed cues, harking back to the days when Crossroads was recorded live. Fictional floor managers and directors can be heard prompting the dreadful actors to say their lines, whilst the end of several scenes show the actors not quite knowing what to do with themselves with the camera still rolling. References to other daytime television devices featured; the announcement that the show's theme tune was available to buy as Anyone Can Break A Vase sung by Miss Babs, was a reference to the release of Anyone Can Fall In Love, based on the EastEnders theme and sung by one of its cast members, Anita Dobson. Wood created a spoof arts documentary about the show for her As Seen on TV special, in keeping with similar straight-faced "behind-the-scenes" shows produced about soap operas, which reveals the shambolic Acorn Antiques production, interviews the self-obsessed fictional actors behind the fictional characters.

At one point, when an obvious continuity error is pointed out, the hard-nosed producer "Marion Clune" sums up the directorial attitude: "We professionals notice - Joe Public never clocks a darn thing." The documentary depicts the actress portraying the drudge Mrs. Overall as being an archetypal soap diva called Bo Beaumont. In the final show of Victoria Wood As Seen on TV a sketch was shown where the actors playing Mrs Overall and Mr Clifford are axed from the soap and Bo Beaumont Walters) breezes out of the studio, complaining to the TV news crew outside "Does a faithful dog expect to be kicked? That show was my life." The sketches led to a fanzine and appreciation gatherings where fans would dress up as the characters. In 2004, in a poll on its website, Channel 4 voted Acorn Antiques the 7th best comedy sketch of all time; the show made a brief return to television in 1992 in Victoria Wood's All Day Breakfast, her satire on daytime television. A sketch of its soap, The Mall, ends with Mrs Overall returning to reopen Acorn Antiques, mentioning that the other principal characters had been killed in a bus crash.

A special one off episode was broadcast in 1996 in a programme to commemorate 60 years of BBC Television. One final sketch was shown in 2001 with Nick Frost as an armed robber. In 2005 Victoria Wood created a musical version with Julie Walters, Celia Imrie and other members of the original cast, the role of Mrs Overall being alternated between Julie Walters and Wood; the original run had a sellout season in the West End. It earned several Olivier Award nominations, Celia Imrie won the award for Best Supporting Actress in a Musical, it was revived on tour in 2007, directed this time by Victoria Wood herself. The Crescent Theatre in Birmingham presented the premiere of the first amateur production of the show in May 2010; the Leighton Masqueraders became the second amateur drama group to put on a production of the show in 2010. Richard and Thomas Ayre are listed as lighting operators, Victoria Wood attend

Diamond City, Arkansas

Diamond City is a city in northeast Boone County, United States. The population was 782 at the 2010 census, it is part of the Harrison Micropolitan Statistical Area. Diamond City is located on the south shore of Bull Shoals Lake between east and west Sugarloaf Creeks; the community of Lead Hill lies two miles south on Route 7. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.68 square miles, all of it land. Arkansas Highway 7Arkansas State Highway 7 reaches its northern terminus at Bull Shoals Lake at the northern edge of Diamond City at a state maintained park and owned marina's; as of the census of the year 2000, there were 730 people, 346 households, 235 families residing in the city. The population density was 272.9 people per square mile. There were 547 housing units at an average density of 204.5 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 96.71% White, 0.55% Native American, 2.74% from two or more races. 1.37 % of the population were Latino of any race. There were 346 households out of which 13.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.3% were married couples living together, 3.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.8% were non-families.

28.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.11 and the average family size was 2.55. In the city, the population was spread out with 15.3% under the age of 18, 4.0% from 18 to 24, 19.2% from 25 to 44, 32.2% from 45 to 64, 29.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 54 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.6 males. The median income for a household in the city was $23,704, the median income for a family was $27,946. Males had a median income of $24,659 versus $17,708 for females; the per capita income for the city was $13,968. About 16.2% of families and 18.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.0% of those under age 18 and 7.2% of those age 65 or over. Diamond City, along with Lead Hill and South Lead Hill, is within the Lead Hill School District, which leads to graduation from Lead Hill High School.

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Diamond City has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. Map of Diamond City Boone County Historical and Railroad Society, Inc. Lead Hill School District City government information Boone County School District Reference Map

Hamilton United Reformed Church

The United Reformed Church, Scotland, is made up of two congregations which merged in 1966. The older congregation met in a building at Back o’ Barns, was founded under the guidance of the Reverend Greville Ewing, instrumental in founding many such independent churches in Scotland, the Scottish Congregational College; that congregation settled in Auchingramont Road, in its latter form was known as St. James’ Congregational Church. Due to a theological dispute a small number of members left that congregation and formed a church which met in South Park Road; this congregation associated itself with the founded Evangelical Union of Scotland. In 1896 the Congregational Union of Scotland and the Evangelical Union of Scotland found that they had sufficient in common in both theology and church policy that it was prudent to form a single body, thus both Hamilton congregations became part of the one denomination, The Congregational Union of Scotland. Over the years both congregations provided members to serve on many of the denominational committees.

In 1966 St. James’ Congregational Church closed, the two congregations merged under the title Hamilton Congregational Church, agreeing to use the building located in South Park Road. In the closing decades of the twentieth century the Congregational Union of Scotland underwent a number of changes and became The Scottish Congregational Church, before, on 1 April 2000, it united with the United Reformed Church. David Livingstone’s family used to walk from the mill house at Blantyre to Hamilton every Sunday to attend the Church, they worshipped at St. James’ Congregational Church, it is said that Mrs. Livingstone was so independent that they carried not only their own lunch, but tea and salt, so that the only hospitality that they required was boiling water; the David Livingstone Centre, at Blantyre, records much of his missionary work, as well as preserving the room in which he was brought up. Neil Livingstone, David’s father, was one of the group who left the St. James’ congregation, is listed as one of the first Deacons of the South Park Road Congregation.

When St. James’ Church closed in 1966 all the Livingstone memorabilia was moved into the current church building. Official website

2019–20 Serbian Cup

The 2019–20 Serbian Cup season is the thirteenth season of the Serbian national football cup competition. It started on 11 September 2019, will end on 24 May 2020. A preliminary round was held in order to reduce the number of teams competing in the first round to 32, it consisted of 3 single-legged ties, with a penalty shoot-out as the decider if the score was tied after 90 minutes. Draw for the first round took place on 13 September 2019. Matches will be played on 25 and 26 September 2019, with matches including Javor, Voždovac, Red Star and Partizan being postponed to 9 October and 10 October due to their earlier European fixures; the 16 winners from first round will take part in this stage of the competition. The draw was held on 15 October 2019, it contained seeded and unseeded teams; the seeds were determined by last season's final standings in the Serbian top divisions. Matches will be played on 23 October 2019, with matches including Red Star and Partizan being postponed to 20 November due to their European fixures.

Official site

FC Yambol

FC Yambol 1915 is a Bulgarian football club based in Yambol playing in the Third Amateur Football League, the third division of Bulgarian football. Its home stadium "Tundzha" has a capacity of 18,000 seats. Club colors are white; the club was founded on 17 March 1915. The team was one of the founders of Bulgarian B Group under the name Partizan. FC Tundzha is in 40th place on A Group All-time ranking 1948–2013; the team is successor to Botev, Georgi Drazhev, Nikolai Lyskov, Spartak, DNA, Red Flag and Glory. During the 1950s the team tried to become a stable part of Bulgarian B BFG. In the 1960s, as established participant, the team was involved in the fight for the title every season, in season 1969–70 FC Tungzha became a champion; the team played in Bulgarian top division between 1970 and 1973. The team is established as a middle-class team. During the 1980s the team tried to remain part of Bulgarian B Group. One time the team again went back to the professionals. In the 1990s the team started its biggest falls in history.

In 1994 the team fell from "B" Group to "V" Football Group. During the season 2000–01 the team fell into the "A" local group. In 2005–06 it lost the promotion for entering "V" Football Group, but in 2006–07 entered "V" Group. In the 2011–12 season FC Tundzha ended the season in second place, after the team lost the promotion in the last round in Southeastern "V" Group; the team played in 1/18 finals in The Bulgarian Cup in 2011–12. Two times semi-finalist in the National Championship in 1933 and 1936; the biggest success in First Professional Football League is the 13th place in 1970–71 and three years playing in there. On 2 August 2017 the Third League team Uragan Boyadzhik adapted Yambol 1915 name and moved to Yambol to succeed the dissolved in 2015 team. Bulgarian State Football Championship/A Group: Third place: 1933, 1936 B Group: Winners: 1969–70 Bulgarian Cup: Semifinals: 1939 As of 1 September 2019Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

Vasil Metodiev Angel Chervenkov Georgi Mechedzhiev Vladko Shalamanov Stancho Gerdzhikov bgclubs.eu Official website