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St John's Uniting Church, Neutral Bay

St John's Uniting Church and Pipe Organ is a heritage-listed Uniting church at Yeo Street, Neutral Bay, North Sydney Council, New South Wales, Australia. The church was built by Collins, it is known as St. John's Uniting Church and Pipe Organ and Richardson Pipe Organ; the property is owned by the Uniting Church of Australia. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999; the Presbyterian congregation was established in Neutral Bay in 1889. Land for a church was donated by Captain Robert Craig and the foundation stone was laid on 26 April 1890. Architect was Charles H. Slatyer of 96 Pitt Street and builders were Messrs Tafield and Collins; the church was opened on 19 July 1890. An 1890 photograph shows the church as an austere gothic structure consisting of the central four bays of the present building, it was enlarged in 1898 and in 1908. The pipe organ was installed in 1912, the manse built in 1920, the school hall in 1923; the church is a buttressed brick building with a steep gabled roof.

The interior is plastered and each bay is occupied by a memorial tablet. There is an elaborate carved pulpit and two windows in the organ chamber designed by Norman St Carter and executed by F. J. Tarrant of Darling Harbour; the diagonal boarded hammer-beam roof features nailed laminated arches. The organ is a rare intact example of the work of Charles Richardson, the most prominent organ-maker in New South Wales from 1883 to 1920, it features a case design, unique for its period, is a late example of the use of tracker action to the manuals. This building is designed in the Victorian Free Gothic style; the slate roof was replaced in 1979 with concrete tiles. The north end, a addition, has a large three-light lancet window and a well-proportioned stone-trimmed entry porch; the organ chamber at the south end a addition, is separately roofed. The church is a competent late Victorian example of the gothic style arranged to meet Presbyterian liturgical requirements, its corner site makes it significant in the streetscape.

The use of thin laminations as an integral part of the circular arch roof structure makes the building unique for its date in structural terms. The organ is significant as being a rare intact example of the work of Charles Richardson, the most prominent organ-builder of New South Wales from 1883 to 1920. Interior detailing of significance, including joinery. St John's Uniting Church and Pipe Organ was listed on the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999. Uniting Church in Australia "Neutral Bay Post Office to Cremorne and Military Road Heritage Walk". 2007. Attraction Homepage. "Neutral Bay Post Office to Cremorne and Military Road Heritage Walk". This Wikipedia article was based on St. John's Uniting Church and Pipe Organ, entry number 00423 in the New South Wales State Heritage Register published by the State of New South Wales and Office of Environment and Heritage 2018 under CC-BY 4.0 licence, accessed on 1 June 2018. This Wikipedia article was based on St John's Uniting Church, entry number I0766 in the New South Wales State Heritage Register published by the State of New South Wales and Office of Environment and Heritage 2018 under CC-BY 4.0 licence, accessed on 6 September 2018.

"St John's Uniting Church, Cnr Yeo and Barry Streets, Neutral Bay". Sydney Organ. 206

Lessingia lemmonii

Lessingia lemmonii is a species of flowering plant in the daisy family known by the common name Lemmon's lessingia. It is native to the western United States around the intersection of Nevada and California, where it grows in desert and other habitat with sandy soils; this is an annual herb producing gray-green woolly stems in a low clump just a few centimeters high to a erect 40 centimeters tall. The leaves are narrow and small, under 2 centimeters long, with much larger leaves appearing around the base of the young plant and withering away early; the flower heads appear singly or in open arrays. Each head has a bell- to bullet-shaped involucre lined with hairy to woolly phyllaries; the head is discoid, containing no ray florets but many funnel-shaped yellow disc florets with long lobes. The florets have white markings in the throats; the fruit is an achene with a brownish pappus of bristles. Jepson Manual Treatment USDA Plants Profile Photo gallery