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Thomas Moore

Thomas Moore was an Irish poet, singer and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of "The Minstrel Boy" and "The Last Rose of Summer". As Lord Byron's named literary executor, along with John Murray, Moore was responsible for burning Lord Byron's memoirs after his death. In his lifetime he was referred to as Anacreon Moore. From a early age, Moore showed an interest in music and other performing arts, he sometimes appeared in musical plays with his friends, such as The Poor Soldier by John O'Keeffe, at one point had ambitions to become an actor. Moore attended several Dublin schools including Samuel Whyte's English Grammar School in Grafton Street where he learned the English accent with which he spoke for the rest of his life. In 1795 he graduated from Trinity College, which had allowed entry to Catholic students, in an effort to fulfill his mother's dream of his becoming a lawyer. Moore was a good student, but he put less effort into his studies, his time at Trinity came amidst the ongoing turmoil following the French Revolution, a number of his fellow students such as Robert Emmet were supporters of the United Irishmen movement, although Moore himself never was a member.

This movement sought support from the French government to launch a revolution in Ireland. In 1798 a rebellion broke out followed by a French invasion. Besides Emmet, another formative influence was Edward Hudson a fellow student at Trinity College, who played a crucial role in introducing Moore to Edward Bunting's A General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music one of the main sources of his own collection of Irish Melodies. Thomas Moore was born at 12 Aungier Street in Ireland. Over his father's grocery shop, his father being from the Kerry Gaeltacht and his mother, Anastasia Codd, from Wexford, he had two younger sisters and Ellen. From a early age Moore showed an interest in music and other performing arts, he sometimes appeared in musical plays with his friends, such as The Poor Soldier by John O'Keeffe, at one point had ambitions to become an actor. Moore attended several Dublin schools including Samuel Whyte's English Grammar School in Grafton Street where he learned the English accent with which he spoke for the rest of his life.

In 1795 he graduated from Trinity College, which had allowed entry to Catholic students, in an effort to fulfill his mother's dream of his becoming a lawyer. Moore was a good student, but he put less effort into his studies, his time at Trinity came amidst the ongoing turmoil following the French Revolution, a number of his fellow students such as Robert Emmet were supporters of the United Irishmen movement, although Moore himself never was a member. This movement sought support from the French government to launch a revolution in Ireland. In 1798 a rebellion broke out followed by a French invasion. Besides Emmet, another formative influence was Edward Hudson a fellow student at Trinity College, who played a crucial role in introducing Moore to Edward Bunting's A General Collection of the Ancient Irish Music one the main sources of his own collection of Irish Melodies. In 1799 he travelled to London to study law at Middle Temple, he had difficulties in paying the fees and his tailor's bills. He was helped in this by his friends in the expatriate Irish community in London, including Barbara, widow of Arthur Chichester, 1st Marquess of Donegall.

She and her sister became his lifelong friends. However, it was as a poet, translator and singer that he found fame, his work soon became immensely popular and included "The Harp That Once Through Tara’s Halls", "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms", "The Meeting of the Waters" and many other specimens from his collections of Irish Melodies. Called "Moore's Melodies", they were published between 1808 and 1834, but Moore was far more than a balladeer. He had major success as a society figure in London, meeting the Prince of Wales on several occasions and enjoying in particular the patronage of the Irish aristocrat Lord Moira. Moore stayed at Moira's house at Donnington Park in Leicestershire where he enjoyed the extensive library, he collaborated with Michael Kelly and Charles Edward Horn in staging operas to his librettos in 1801 and 1811. In 1803 he was appointed registrar to the Admiralty in Bermuda, he spent around three months on the island, but he found his work light and uninspiring.

There were several other prize courts nearby and few captured ships were brought to Bermuda leaving him little to do. Although he drew inspiration from the scenery of Bermuda he found its society limited and soon departed for Norfolk in Virginia; because of his brief stay there, he has sometimes been treated as an unofficial poet laureate of Bermuda. His "Ode to Nea" caused something of a scandal since the language suggested a love affair and local gossip, rightly or wrongly, identified Nea with Hester Tucker, the young wife of one of his colleagues. From Norfolk he travelled across the United States and Canada in a Grand Tour. During this visit Moore developed a critical view of the United States, he disliked the governing Democratic-Republican Party and the President Thomas Jefferson. While in Washington he stayed with Anthony Merry, the British ambassador, met Jefferson briefly: the meeting had a touch of farce since the President mistook Moore, an exceptionally small man, for a child, he travelled through various American towns and cities, enjoying his time most in Philadelphia where he had a

Forbidden (Dekker and Lee novel)

Forbidden is a science fiction fantasy novel by Ted Dekker and Tosca Lee, published in September 2011. It is the first book in a trilogy, was followed by the novels Mortal in June 2012 and Sovereign in June 2013. A prequel, titled The Keeper was published in 2011. Fearing for his life, Rom is on stumbles across a vial of blood and a cryptic message. Meanwhile, the ruler of the world Saric, in the city Byzantium, is curious about emotion. Years before, the founder of the Order, has unleashed a genetic virus that suppressed emotion. Saric wanted to experience it firsthand. Rom goes home, only to discover guards killing his mother, he runs to his friend Avra's house to drink a mouth full of the blood. It knocks him out; when he wakes up, he discovered. He feels, they enlist two other friends. Rom looks at the vellum, unable to decipher it, he and the four kidnaps the sovereign's sister. She helps; the scientist in his writing said that a boy in year 471 will be born with full emotion and be the savior of the human race.

They take him. Jonathan, at nine years old, grants regency to the Senate. Rom takes the boy to find supporters. Rom: Receives an ancient vial of blood with a piece of cryptic writing. In fear of his life, he drinks a portion of the vial revealing new emotions of love never experienced before; the blood resurrects hatred and greed that come at a terrible risk. After he discovers this new life he must risk everything to find a way to bring life to the rest of the world. Avra: Best friends of Rom, she goes to his aid when Rom finds that he is in trouble. After Rom drinks a portion of the blood, she drinks another portion of the blood, she discovers the same love for Rom. She helps Rom on his quest. Feyn: The soon to be Sovereign of the world and the sister of Saric, she is the closest to one of three eligible birth cycles during the reign of the current Sovereign. Saric: The son of the current Sovereign who experiments with a concoction to bring back emotions that were lost, he is in search of the vial of blood.

He will stop at nothing to get the vial. Jonathan: The boy, in hiding due to his disfigurement and is the true Sovereign to be of the world, his blood will bring life back to the world. Vorrin: The current Sovereign, five days from his term, where he will pass his reign to his daughter Feyn. Triphon: A Citadel Guard, in training and long time friends of Rom, takes a portion of the vial to see if what Rom tells him is true, he helps Rom in his quest. Neah: A long time friend of Rom who follows the Order, is forced to take a portion of the vial, she helps Rom and Triphon on their quest

Holbrook Municipal Airport

Holbrook Municipal Airport is a public use airport located 3.5 miles northeast of the central business district of Holbrook, in Navajo County, United States. It is owned by the City of Holbrook; this airport is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems, which categorized it as a general aviation facility. Holbrook Municipal Airport covers an area of 343 acres at an elevation of 5,262 feet above mean sea level, it has two runways: 3/21 is 6,698 by 75 feet with an asphalt surface. The airport is maintained by the city. There is fuel available for sale and pilots lounge with TV, restroom. For the 12-month period ending April 14, 2011, the airport had 3,630 general aviation aircraft operations, an average of 302 per month. At that time there were 12 aircraft based at this airport: 50% single-engine, 42% ultralight, 8% multi-engine. List of airports in Arizona Holbrook Municipal Airport at Arizona DOT Aerial image as of June 1997 from USGS The National Map Resources for this airport: FAA airport information for P14 AirNav airport information for P14 FlightAware airport information and live flight tracker SkyVector aeronautical chart for P14