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Todd County, Minnesota

Todd County is a county in the U. S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 24,895, its county seat is Long Prairie. The county was created by the Minnesota Territorial legislature on February 20, 1855, although the county government was not organized until January 1, 1867, with Long Prairie as the county seat, it was named for John Blair Smith Todd, a delegate from Dakota Territory to the United States House of Representatives, general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The Crow Wing River flows southeastward along the NE border of Todd County; the Long Prairie River flows east-northeast through the upper eastern part of the county, discharging into the Crow Wing on the county's NE border. The county terrain dotted with lakes and etched with drainages; the area is devoted to agriculture. The terrain slopes to the east and south, with its highest point on the west border at 1,483' ASL; the county has a total area of 980 sqmi, of which 945 sqmi is land and 35 sqmi is water.

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 24,426 people, 9,342 households, 6,511 families in Todd County. The population density was 25.8/sqmi. There were 11,900 housing units at an average density of 12.6/sqmi. The racial makeup of the county was 97.54% White, 0.11% Black or African American, 0.48% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.72% from other races, 0.82% from two or more races. 1.90 % of the population were Latino of any race. 52.1 % were of 5.6 % Polish ancestry. There were 9,342 households out of which 31.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.80% were married couples living together, 6.10% had a female householder with no husband present, 30.30% were non-families. 26.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.00% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.14. The county population contained 27.40% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 24.70% from 25 to 44, 23.80% from 45 to 64, 16.10% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 101.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.00 males. The median income for a household in the county was $32,281, the median income for a family was $39,920. Males had a median income of $28,630 versus $20,287 for females; the per capita income for the county was $15,658. About 9.60% of families and 12.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.60% of those under age 18 and 13.50% of those age 65 or over. Todd County has a large concentration of Amish, about the same population size as the Amish settlement at Harmony, Minnesota, it is home to five different Amish communities, with altogether 7 church districts in 2013, which indicates a total population of about 1000 people. Philbrook Pillsbury Ward Springs Todd County voters tend to vote Republican. In 71% of national elections since 1960, the county selected the Republican Party candidate. Dromedary Hills National Register of Historic Places listings in Todd County, Minnesota Todd County government’s website

Billy Hayes (trade unionist)

William Hayes is the former leader of the Communication Workers' Union in the United Kingdom. Born in Fazakerley Liverpool, he attended St Swithin's Secondary Modern School on Croxteth Hall Lane, he gained a Diploma in Trade Union Studies from the University of Liverpool. Hayes worked as a welder from 1968–71 for John West Foods from 1971–73, before becoming a postman in 1974, he became active in the CWU, in 1992 was elected to its National Executive Committee as a national officer, the Assistant Secretary of the Outdoor Department. He was elected General Secretary of the union in 2001; as General Secretary for the CWU, his reported annual salary in 2009 was £97,647. During his time in office membership of the union has fallen by 100,000 due to mass redundancies and an ageing workforce within British Telecoms and postal service Royal Mail. In 2015, he was beaten for re-election by Dave Ward, he is World President of UNI Logistics - a sector of UNI Global Union. With more than 2.5 million members worldwide the Post and Logistics Sector is one of UNI's largest.

In September 2017 he and Seema Chandwani were elected to the Labour Conference Arrangements Committee. In September 1995 he married Dian Lee in Knowsley, they have a daughter. Dave Ward

Carole Terry

Carole Ruth Terry is an American organist and pedagogue. Carole Terry received her musical training at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Eastman School of Music, Stanford University, where she obtained in 1977 a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in early music performance practice, her teachers in Stanford were Herbert Nanney, Margaret Fabrizio, Joan Benson. In 1979, she was appointed professor of organ and harpsichord at the University of Washington in Seattle. From 2000–2003, she was Resident Organist and curator of the C. B. Fisk organ at Benaroya Hall in Seattle; as organist and harpsichordist, she has performed throughout the United States and Asia, serves as jury member for international organ competitions and lecturer for master classes in keyboard performance practice. Brombaugh organs of the Northwest. Works of John Dowland, Melchior Schildt, Samuel Scheidt, Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck, Peter Mohrhardt, Heinrich Scheidemann, Matthias Weckmann. Carole Terry, organ. Recorded in June 1983 on the John Brombaugh organs at Grace Episcopal Church, Ellensburg, WA, Christ Episcopal Church, Tacoma, WA, Central Lutheran Church, Eugene, OR.

Ocean, NJ: Musical Heritage Society, 1986. MHS 7368. 1 LP. 20th century harpsichord works. Vincent Persichetti, William Albright, Ned Rorem, Henry Cowell. Carole Terry, harpsichord. Recorded in August and November 1985 in Seattle, WA. New York, NY: CRI, 1986 CRI SD 533. 1 LP. The complete organ works of Johannes Brahms. Carole Terry, organ. Flentrop organ at St. Mark's Episcopal Cathedral, Seattle, WA. Ocean, NJ: Musical Heritage Society, 1990. MHS 512523M. 1 CD. Carole Terry in Schwerin. Works by Johann Gottlob Töpfer, August Wilhelm Bach, Johann Georg Herzog, Johann Christian Heinrich Rinck, Joseph Rheinberger, Julius Reubke, August Gottfried Ritter, Ernst Friedrich Richter, Robert Schumann, Felix Mendelssohn, Johannes Brahms, Johann Friedrich Ludwig Thiele. Carole Terry, organ. Recorded in August 1996 on the Ladegast organ at Schwerin Cathedral, Germany. Seattle, WA: Ambassador Recording Corporation, 1998. ARC 1021. 2 CDs. Carole Terry plays the Watjen concert organ. Works by Felix Mendelssohn, Jan Pieterszoon Sweelinck, William Albright, Johann Sebastian Bach, John Stanley, Robert Schumann, Louis Vierne, Charles-Marie Widor.

Carole Terry, organ. Recorded on December 13 and 20, 2004, on September, 2006, on the C. B. Fisk organ Opus 114 at Seattle. Seattle, WA: Loft Recordings, 2008. LRCD-1105. 1 CD. Faculty Website at the University of Washington in Seattle, WA Artist Biography on the Philip Truckenbrod Concert Artists Website

BCCI Awards

The BCCI Awards are a set of annual cricket awards given by the Board of Control for Cricket in India. The awards recognise and honour the best Indian international and domestic cricketers of the past year; the awards were first given in 2006–07. Polly Umrigar Award for international cricketer of the year: Sachin Tendulkar CK Nayudu Award for lifetime achievement: Nari Contractor Madhavrao Scindia Award for most runs in Ranji Trophy: Robin Uthappa Madhavrao Scindia Award for most wickets in Ranji Trophy: Ranadeb Bose Best Cricket Association of the Year for overall performance: Mumbai M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-15 cricketer: Mandeep Singh M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-17 cricketer: Ajay Rana M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-19 cricketer: Ajinkya Rahane M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-22 cricketer: Manoj Tiwary M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman cricketer: Jaya Sharma Other awardsJhulan Goswami was awarded a trophy and a cheque for Rs one lakh for becoming the ICC Women's Cricketer of the Year 2007.

Anju Jain and Anjum Chopra were given a trophy each for winning the Arjuna Award in women's cricket for 2006 and 2007 respectively. Ref: Polly Umrigar Award for international cricketer of the year: Virender Sehwag CK Nayudu Award for lifetime achievement: Gundappa Viswanath Madhavrao Scindia Award for most runs in Ranji Trophy: Cheteshwar Pujara Madhavrao Scindia Award for most wickets in Ranji Trophy: Sudeep Tyagi Best Cricket Association of the Year for overall performance: Maharashtra M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-15 cricketer: Ankit Bawne M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-17 cricketer: Mandeep Singh M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-19 cricketer: Bhuvneshwar Kumar M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-22 cricketer: Rahul Dewan M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman cricketer: Mithali Raj Other awardsMahendra Singh Dhoni was handed a special award for winning the Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna and the Padma Shri. Harbhajan Singh was handed a special award for winning the Padma Shri.

Ref: Polly Umrigar Award for international cricketer of the year: Gautam Gambhir CK Nayudu Award for lifetime achievement: Mohinder Amarnath Madhavrao Scindia Award for most runs in Ranji Trophy: Wasim Jaffer Madhavrao Scindia Award for most wickets in Ranji Trophy: Dhawal Kulkarni & Ravindra Jadeja Best Cricket Association of the Year for overall performance: Mumbai & Punjab M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-16 cricketer: Chirag Khurana M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-19 cricketer: Harpreet Singh M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-22 cricketer: Neelkanth Das M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman cricketer: Reema Malhotra M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman junior cricketer: Poonam Raut Best umpire: Amish Saheba Other awardsRahul Dravid was handed a special award for taking the most catches. Sachin Tendulkar was handed a special award for completing two decades of international cricket. Ref: Polly Umrigar Award for international cricketer of the year: Sachin Tendulkar CK Nayudu Award for lifetime achievement: Salim Durani Madhavrao Scindia Award for most runs in Ranji Trophy: Manish Pandey Madhavrao Scindia Award for most wickets in Ranji Trophy: Abhimanyu Mithun Best Cricket Association of the Year for overall performance: Maharashtra M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-16 cricketer: Baba Aparajith M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-19 cricketer: Bhargav Merai M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-22 cricketer: Natraj Behera M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman cricketer: Thirush Kamini M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman junior cricketer: Reva Arora Best umpire: K. Hariharan Ref: Polly Umrigar Award for international cricketer of the year: Rahul Dravid CK Nayudu Award for lifetime achievement: Ajit Wadekar Madhavrao Scindia Award for most runs in Ranji Trophy: Subramaniam Badrinath Madhavrao Scindia Award for most wickets in Ranji Trophy: Bhargav Bhatt Best Cricket Association of the Year for overall performance: Railways & Delhi M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-16 cricketer: Vijay Zol M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-19 cricketer: Avi Barot M A Chidambaram Trophy for best Under-22 cricketer: Suryakumar Yadav M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman cricketer: Jhulan Goswami M A Chidambaram Trophy for best woman junior cricketer: Mona Meshram Best umpire: S. Ravi Lala Amarnath Award for best all-rounder in Ranji Trophy: Iqbal Abdulla Lala Amarnath Award for best all-rounder in limited-overs tournaments: Sumit Narwal Other awardsDilip Sardesai Award for India's best cricketer in the 2011 Test series in the West Indies: Ishant Sharma Dilip Sardesai Award for India's best cricketer in the 2011 Test serie

Richmond Robottin

Richmond Robottin is a dance style, derived from the solo and individual dance art form known as The Robot. This style of robotic dancing was pioneered out of the city of California; this version of Robot movement derived from the general idea of one person moving like a Robot. Along with basic robot movement by one person, there developed robot "dance" movement by one person; when there became more than one individual, the formation of a "group" evolved. Many Richmond dancers who considered themselves a "Robot" dancer developed their own style of solo Robot movement and dance, drawing influences from many different sources. For dancers growing up in Richmond, California USA, the group dance style came together and flourished during the 1970s and early 1980s at its local area Talent Shows. One of the elements, known within the Robot dance community is the robot pose. One pose can be followed by a series of poses; these poses are followed by "hits" or "dime stops". Basic Robot movement can be associated with the art of mime movement, both with and without music.

Like many neighborhoods in the Northern California Bay Area, Richmond had predominantly African-American communities during these time periods. Thus, the existence of R&B, Soul and Funk music has associated ties with its social dances and its Robot dance styles; this type of Robot movement incorporates "funk-oriented" and "soulful" moves and dances. Many young individuals who were growing up in the city of Richmond during this time not only moved and danced like Robots, but created groups which performed Robot dance routines; these various groups of Robot dancers and their routines became known as "Richmond Robottin’" throughout the communities via the performances at the held Talent Shows at the Richmond Memorial Auditorium. A Richmond Robottin’ dance group routine is based on its own evolved style of robotic group choreography, which stems from the basic formulas that were common among Northern California Bay Area dance groups: "together" movements: all members in the group executing the same move in the form of robot poses with "hits" and "dime stops" executed at different points.

"catch on" movements: one dancer begins a move individually that can go for one or more counts, returns to the point of origin and starts the same move again, whereby the second dancer executes the same move together with the first dancer's second execution of the same move, executing together at the same time. "domino" movements: one dancer begins a move on the beat of a song continues to a second move on the next beat, whereby the second dancer executes the same move one beat after the first dancer. This sequence can be followed by however many dancers are within the group to complete the domino movement. "combination" movements: combined sequences of "together", "catch on" and "domino" movements within the group to create innovative and complex robot routines. This style of robotic group dancing further evolved at Richmond, California, USA Talent Shows through more complex robot routines that were performed to faster speeds of selected music. Thus, the style of "Richmond Robottin'." Richmond, California USA's version of moving and dancing individually like a robot is influenced by the idea of the human being as a dancer, moving in an unhuman-like manner.

The dance-incorporated versions of urban robotic movements in Richmond, California communities of the 1970s and early 1980s are influenced by American Soul/Funk/R&B music, as well as Electronic and some Rock. The Richmond Robottin dance style can be described as a combination of standard robotic movement and urban dance influenced by Soul/Funk/R&B music. Dance influences derived from the American mime team Shields & Yarnell, consisting of Robert Shields and Lorene Yarnell within the Northern California San Francisco-Oakland-San Jose Bay Area

USNS Maumee (T-AO-149)

USNS Maumee T-AOT-149, was a United States Navy Maumee-class oiler transport oiler, in non-commissioned service with the Military Sea Transportation Service Military Sealift Command, from 1956 until the mid-1980s. Maumee, the fourth U. S. Navy ship to bear the name, was laid down at Sun Shipbuilding and Drydock Company at Chester, Pennsylvania, on 18 March 1955 and launched on 15 November 1955, sponsored by Mrs. Lloyd Harrison, she entered non-commissioned U. S. Navy service under the control of the Military Sea Transportation Service the Military Sealift Command, with a civilian crew on 17 December 1956. Maumee was the lead unit of her new "supertanker" class and the first vessel in naval history to be launched as a United States Naval Ship, intended for non-commissioned U. S. Navy service with a civilian crew. Built along commercial tanker lines for MSTS duty, following her completion, was turned over to Marine Transport Lines to operate for MSTS as a civilian-manned ship under a long‑term consecutive‑voyage charter.

By 1958 she had begun her first prolonged duty in the Pacific. Her role was point‑to‑point delivery of bulk petroleum in support of the U. S. armed forces in the Pacific area. From 1968 to 1971, the ship was used in the Navy's Operation Deep Freeze II, where it was used to transport fuel supplies to McMurdo Sound, it was the largest ship to visit Antarctica, was led into the ice pack by ice breakers. She was reclassified as a "transport oiler", resulting her redesignation from "T-AO-149" to "T-AOT-149". Maumee was placed out of service at an unrecorded date in the mid-1980s, she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register at an unrecorded date, was transferred to the Maritime Administration on 23 December 1994 to be laid up in the National Defense Reserve Fleet at Beaumont, Texas. She was sold for scrapping on 9 November 2006 to ESCO Marine of Texas, and departed the National Defense Reserve Fleet, Beaumont Group, on 23 January 2007 for scrapping by ESCO Marine. Media related to IMO 7737183 at Wikimedia Commons This article incorporates text from the public domain Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships.

The entry can be found here. NavSource Online: Service Ship Photo Archive: USNS Maumee