UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

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UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
Main entrance to the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health building main entrance
TypePublic
Established1961
Parent institution
University of California, Los Angeles
DeanRon Brookmeyer[1]
Academic staff
237, 64 full-time
Students636
Postgraduates434
202
Location, ,
US

34°04′00″N 118°26′54″W / 34.066750°N 118.448280°W / 34.066750; -118.448280Coordinates: 34°04′00″N 118°26′54″W / 34.066750°N 118.448280°W / 34.066750; -118.448280
Websiteph.ucla.edu
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health logo 2015.png

The UCLA Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health is the graduate school of public health at UCLA, and is located within the Center for Health Sciences building on UCLA's campus in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has 636 students representing 27 countries, more than 10,000 alumni and 237 faculty, 64 of whom are full-time.[2]

UCLA was recently ranked the No. 1 public university in the United States by U.S. News & World Report and the Fielding School of Public Health consistently ranks in the top ten schools of public health in the United States.[3][4]

Founded in 1961, the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health aims to build health and equity, and to drive positive change for all people; the school acts on this mission through initiatives in three core areas: education, discovery and service. In each of these realms, the school affirms its commitment to developing leaders and evidence-based solutions, and to working in partnership with communities to promote health and well-being in ways that are innovative, respectful and inclusive.[2]

History[edit]

UCLA began offering undergraduate instruction in public health in 1946. For the next fifteen years, public health instruction at UCLA was within a system-wide University of California public health school. In 1957, UCLA started a program that led to an advanced degree in public health; the UCLA School of Public Health was created on March 17, 1961, and Lenor S. (Steve) Goerke was named the first dean.[5] In June 1993, UCLA announced that it was planning to merge the School of Public Health into the School of Public Policy. UCLA rescinded the plan in March 1994.[6]

In 2003, the School of Public Health began awarding an undergraduate minor in public health.[7]

On February 16, 2012, the school received a gift valued at $50 million, the largest single donation the school received since its creation in 1962. On March 22, 2012 the school was officially named the UCLA Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health and the new sign on the building was unveiled.[8]

Students and Faculty[edit]

Students[edit]

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health is home to a diverse public health student body, with students hailing from 27 countries; the school has five academic departments  — Biostatistics, Community Health Sciences, Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology, and Health Policy and Management — and offers four degree types: MPH, MS, PhD and DrPh. Additionally, concurrent and articulated degrees and certificates enable students to gain specialized knowledge in areas such as global health, population and reproductive health, environmental health, and health care management and leadership.[2] Fielding School students also have access to a wide range of local and global hands-on training opportunities that provide the skills needed to move public health evidence to action.[9]

Faculty[edit]

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty are leading efforts that improve people’s lives in Los Angeles and around the world. From preventing millions of HIV infections, improving response to Ebola and boosting HPV vaccine uptake to establishing healthy lifestyle choices, addressing cancer care and protecting people from food and occupational hazards, Fielding School faculty work on the front lines of change; the school’s research centers lead innovative efforts in environmental genomics, health policy, global infectious diseases, human nutrition, global and immigrant health, health equity, global social policy, population and reproductive health, and more. The school also has 19 Memoranda of Understanding with institutions in countries that include Cambodia, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Germany, Mexico and the Philippines,[2] and multidisciplinary collaboration is encouraged and enhanced by the Fielding School’s presence on UCLA’s unified campus — the schools of medicine, law, nursing, business, dentistry, engineering and more are all located on the Westwood campus of UCLA, named the No. 1 public university in the United States in 2018.[10] Additionally, UCLA ranked ninth in the world in research and teaching according to the 2018 Times Higher Education World (University) Reputation Rankings.[11]

Departments and degrees[edit]

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health offers degrees in the following departments:[12]

The Fielding School of Public Health offers two executive-style MPH degrees:[12]

  • Community Health Sciences – MPH for Health Professionals (MPH-HP)
  • Health Policy and Management – Executive MPH (EMPH)

UCLA also offers an interdepartmental degrees:

The Fielding School of Public Health offers the following joint degrees with other UCLA graduate schools:[13]

  • Fielding School of Public Health/African Studies Program (MPH / MA)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/Asian American Studies Program (MPH / MA)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/Latin American Studies Program (MPH / MA)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/School of Law (MPH / JD)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/School of Management (MPH / MBA)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/School of Medicine (MPH / MD)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/Department of Social Welfare (MPH / MSW)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/Department of Urban and Regional Planning (MPH / MURP)
  • Fielding School of Public Health/Department of Public Policy (MPH/MPP)

Research centers[edit]

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health faculty and students are involved in projects that span bench science, applied research, policy analysis, and community-based local and international projects. Examples of research areas include: access to healthcare, environmental quality, reproductive health, cancer, health disparities, children's health, as well as newer areas of strength in genomics, global health and emerging infectious diseases. Research throughout the school is supported by generous federal, state and private funding, a testament to the merit of the school’s faculty and the quality of their research.[14]

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health research centers include:[14]

  • Biobehavioral Assessment and Research Center (BARC)
  • Fred H. Bixby Center on Population and Reproductive Health
  • Center for Cancer Prevention and Control Research
  • Center for Environmental Genomics
  • Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health
  • Center for Healthier Children, Families, and Communities
  • Center for Occupational and Environmental Health
  • Center for Public Health and Disasters
  • Global Media Center for Social Impact
  • UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health
  • UCLA Center for Health Advancement
  • UCLA Center for Health Policy Research
  • UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Equity
  • UCLA/RAND Prevention Research Center
  • WORLD Policy Analysis Center

Notable faculty[edit]

  • Abdelmonem A. Afifi — Dean of UCLA School of Public Health (1985–2000)[15]
  • Roslyn Alfin-Slater — Demonstrated that cholesterol in normal diets does not raise serum cholesterol[16]
  • Lester Breslow — Dean of UCLA School of Public Health (1972–1980); Former president of the American Public Health Association[17]
  • Ron Brookmeyer — Interim Dean of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health (2018-present)[18]
  • E. Richard Brown — Former president of the American Public Health Association[19]
  • Roger Detels — Dean of UCLA School of Public Health (1980–1985); Demonstrated how HIV-related immune deficiency is transmitted among homosexual men[20]
  • Gladys Emerson — Conducted research leading to the isolation and discovery of the nutritional value of vitamin E[21]
  • Jonathan Fielding — Former Director of Los Angeles County Department of Public Health; namesake of Fielding School of Public Health; awarded the UCLA Medal on April 16, 2009 for his work as an innovator, leader and public health visionary[22]
  • John Froines — Professor in environmental health sciences, former Director of Toxic Substances for Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and member of the Chicago Seven[23]
  • Jody Heymann — Dean Emeritus of the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health (2012-2018)[24]
  • Derrick and Patrice Jelliffe — Led efforts to promote the benefits of breastfeeding on a global scale[25]
  • Lenor Stephen (Steve) Goerke — Dean of UCLA School of Public Health — (1961–1972)[26]
  • Sander Greenland — Professor of epidemiology and statistics, co-author of "Modern Epidemiology", one of the most widely used textbooks of advanced epidemiology (now in 3rd edition)[27]
  • Michael Goldstein — Author of international bestseller "Alternative Health Care: Medicine, Miracle, or Mirage?"[28]
  • Jack Needleman - Professor of Health Policy and Management, and elected member of the Institute of Medicine[29]
  • Milton Roemer — Internationally known health systems researcher. "Roemer's law" refers to the observation that in a fully insured population, any hospital bed that is built will be filled[30]
  • Ruth Roemer — Former president of the American Public Health Association[31]
  • Linda Rosenstock — Dean Emeritus of UCLA School of Public Health (2000–2012)[32]
  • Paul R. Torrens — Author of widely used health policy textbook[33][34]
  • Eleven current faculty are elected members of the prestigious National Academy of Science's Institute of Medicine[35]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the Dean". UCLA School of Public Health. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d "The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  3. ^ Fricano, Mike. "UCLA ranked No. 1 public university by U.S. News & World Report". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  4. ^ U.S. News & World Report L.P. (2015). "Best Public Health Schools". Retrieved January 18, 2019.
  5. ^ "Lenor Stephen Goerke, Preventive Medicine; Public Health: Los Angeles". Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  6. ^ Thomas H. Maugh II (March 18, 1994), "UCLA's School of Public Health to Remain Intact in Restructuring", Los Angeles Times, retrieved April 11, 2010
  7. ^ "Public Health Minor". UCLA School of Public Health. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  8. ^ Gorman, Anna (February 16, 2012). "UCLA School of Public Health gets $50-million gift". Los Angeles Times.
  9. ^ "Financial Opportunities and Training Programs | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  10. ^ Fricano, Mike. "UCLA ranked No. 1 public university by U.S. News & World Report". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  11. ^ Kendall, Rebecca. "UCLA ranked No. 9 in Times Higher Education World Reputation Rankings". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  12. ^ a b "Academic Departments | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  13. ^ "Concurrent & Articulated Degree Programs". UCLA Graduate Division. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  14. ^ a b "Centers and Programs". UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. Retrieved January 18, 2019.
  15. ^ "Abdelmonem A. Afifi | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  16. ^ Writer, From a Times Staff (2002-08-17). "Roslyn Alfin-Slater, 86; UCLA Professor, Expert on Nutrition". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  17. ^ Julie Marquis (October 13, 1997), "Dr. Lester Breslow: Mr. Public Health", Los Angeles Times, retrieved April 11, 2010
  18. ^ Health, UCLA Fielding School of Public. "Ronald S. Brookmeyer named interim dean of UCLA Fielding School of Public Health". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  19. ^ Driscoll, Gwen. "Obituary: E. Richard Brown, 70, UCLA professor, leading health care reform advocate". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  20. ^ Molly Hennessy-Fiske (October 16, 2009), "Town hall focuses on L.A.'s battle with HIV/AIDS", Los Angeles Times, retrieved April 11, 2010
  21. ^ "Emerson, Gladys Anderson | 1943". oklahomahof.com. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  22. ^ "Jonathan Fielding | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  23. ^ "John Froines | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  24. ^ "Jody Heymann | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-18.
  25. ^ Myrna Oliver (March 21, 1992), "Derrick Jelliffe; UCLA Public Health Expert", Los Angeles Times, retrieved April 11, 2010
  26. ^ "Lenor Stephen Goerke, Preventive Medicine; Public Health: Los Angeles", 1975, University of California: In Memoriam, University of California (System) Academic Senate, Author, July 1975
  27. ^ Kenneth J. Rothman; Sander Greenland; Timothy L. Lash (2008). Modern Epidemiology. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. ISBN 978-0-7817-5564-1.
  28. ^ Alternative health care: medicine, miracle, or mirage?. GoogleBooks. Retrieved April 11, 2010.
  29. ^ "Jack Needleman | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  30. ^ Myrna Oliver (January 10, 2001), "Dr. Milton Roemer; Expert on Public Health Taught at UCLA", Los Angeles Times, retrieved April 11, 2010
  31. ^ Elaine Woo (August 5, 2005), "Ruth Roemer, 89; Pioneer in Public Health Law Was Active in Tobacco, Abortion Issues", Los Angeles Times, retrieved April 11, 2010
  32. ^ "Linda Rosenstock | Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health". ph.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  33. ^ Stephen J. Williams, Paul R. Torrens (2007), Introduction to Health Services (7th ed.), Delmar Cengage Learning, ISBN 978-1-4180-1289-2
  34. ^ Abdelmonem A. Afifi (March 25, 1997), "Honor for Torrens", Los Angeles Times, retrieved April 11, 2010
  35. ^ "Directory Search Form". National Academy of Medicine. Retrieved 2019-01-19.