University for the Creative Arts

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University for the Creative Arts
University for the Creative Arts 2015 logo.svg
Type Public
Established 2005 (as the University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester)[1]
Chancellor Zandra Rhodes
Vice-Chancellor Bashir Makhoul
Students 5,934 (2015/16)
Undergraduates 4,500 (2015/16)[2]
Postgraduates 305 (2015/16)[2]
Other students
1,129 FE (2015/16)[3]
Location Canterbury and Rochester, Kent
Epsom and Farnham, Surrey
, England, UK
Affiliations GuildHE
Website uca.ac.uk

The University for the Creative Arts is a specialist art and design university in the south of England.

It was formed in 2005 as University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester when the Kent Institute of Art and Design was merged into the Surrey Institute of Art & Design, which already had degree-awarding status;[4] both constituent schools had been formed by merging the local art schools, in Kent and Surrey respectively. It was granted university status in 2008, and the name changed to the present one; in 2016 it merged with the Open College of the Arts.[5]

History[edit]

The origin of the University for the Creative Arts lies in the establishment of various small art schools in the English counties of Kent and Surrey in the nineteenth century; in Kent the first of these was Maidstone College of Art, founded in 1867, and in Surrey the Guildford School of Art, founded in 1856. During the second half of the twentieth century many of these small art schools merged, eventually forming Kent Institute of Art & Design in 1987, and Surrey Institute of Art & Design in 1995. These two organisations joined forces in 2005 to become the University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester. In May 2008 the University College for Creative Arts was granted full university status by the Privy Council, and adopted its current name, the University for the Creative Arts, officially in September 2008.[6]

Following the election of a Coalition government, the Department for Business Innovation and Skills introduced legislation to increase tuition fees while reducing government spending on Higher Education in real terms[7] and the University for the Creative Arts was revealed to be the fourth most-cut university in England with a cut of 7.8% (10.2% in real terms).[8]

The University for the Creative Arts announced in February 2011 that it was discussing designating part of its Maidstone campus for use by MidKent College.[9] Further to this, MidKent College expressed its willingness to buy the Maidstone campus from 2012 and phase out the UCA presence at the campus by 2014.[10]

Timeline[edit]

  • 1856 - Guildford School of Art is founded as Guildford Working Men's Institution[11]
  • 1866 - Farnham School of Art is founded[12]
  • 1867 - Maidstone College of Art is founded as Maidstone School of Art[13]
  • 1868 - Canterbury College of Art is founded as the Sidney Cooper School of Art[14]
  • 1886 - Medway College of Design is founded as Rochester School of Art[15][16]
  • 1896 - Epsom School of Art & Design is founded as Epsom Technical Institute & School of Art[17]
  • 1969 - Farnham School of Art and Guildford School of Art merge to form West Surrey College of Art & Design[18]
  • 1987 - Canterbury College of Art, Maidstone College of Art and Medway College of Design merge to form Kent Institute of Art & Design [19]
  • 1995 - Epsom School of Art & Design and West Surrey College of Art & Design merge to form Surrey Institute of Art & Design [20]
  • 1999 - Surrey Institute of Art & Design receives University College Title from the Privy Council and is renamed Surrey Institute of Art & Design, University College[21]
  • 2005 - Kent Institute of Art & Design and Surrey Institute of Art & Design, University College merge to form University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone & Rochester [22][23]
  • 2008 - University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone & Rochester receives University Title from the Privy Council and is renamed University for the Creative Arts [24]

Campuses[edit]

UCA has campuses in Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham and Rochester, together with teaching bases at the Royal School of Needlework and The Maidstone Studios,[25] and a project and exhibition space in Folkestone Creative Quarter.[26] It previously had a campus in Maidstone, which was closed in 2014.[27]

The University also validates provision at, or co-delivers courses with, a number of other educational institutions and arts organisations in the UK and overseas: Farnham Maltings, Laine Theatre Arts, London School of Design & Marketing, Millennium Performing Arts, Turner Contemporary, MIT Institute of Design, and Hong Kong Design Institute.[28]

On 1 November 2016 Open College of the Arts became part of UCA, this built on a close working relationship established in 2010.[29]

Organisation and academic life[edit]

UCA is the second largest provider of creative arts education in the UK, with around 6,000 students, and offers courses in a very wide range of architecture, art, design, fashion, media and performing arts subjects.[30] Courses are offered at pre-degree further education, undergraduate, taught postgraduate and doctoral levels.[31]

The University is organised into seven academic schools: Canterbury School of Architecture; Communication Design; Crafts & Design; Fashion; Film, Media & Performing Arts; Fine Art & Photography; and Further Education.[32]

It has five research centres: Centre for Digital Scholarship, Centre for Sustainable Design, Crafts Study Centre, Fine Art & Photography Research Centre, and International Textile Research Centre.[33][34]

The UK's first Business School for the Creative Industries is based at UCA Epsom.[35]

Rankings and reputation[edit]

Rankings
Global rankings
National rankings
Complete[36]
(2019, national)
54
The Guardian[37]
(2019, national)
21
Times/Sunday Times[38]
(2018, national)
58
British Government assessment
Teaching Excellence Framework[39] Silver


Chancellor[edit]

Pro-Chancellors / Chairs of the Board of Governors[edit]

Vice-Chancellors[edit]

  • 2005 - Elaine Thomas[43]
  • 2011 - Simon Ofield-Kerr[44]
  • 2017 - Alan Cooke (Acting)[45]
  • 2017 - Bashir Makhoul[46]

Alumni[edit]

These are people have graduated or have taught at the University for the Creative Arts, they may be listed under the original University name before they merged and became campuses.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The University's History – UCA: University for the Creative Arts". University for the Creative Arts. 2008. Retrieved 1 October 2008. 
  2. ^ a b "Table 1 - HE students by HE provider, level of study, mode of study and domicile 2015/16". Hesa.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  3. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 April 2017. Retrieved 3 April 2017. 
  4. ^ [s.n.] (2007). University College for the Creative Arts at Canterbury, Epsom, Farnham, Maidstone and Rochester. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. ISBN 9781844828029.
  5. ^ University for the Creative Arts. The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education. Accessed January 2018.
  6. ^ See David Haste, The Art Schools of Kent (London: Werther Press, 2013)
  7. ^ Harrison, Angela (17 March 2011). "England's universities face funding cuts of 12%". Bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  8. ^ "University for the Creative Arts faces 7.8% funding cut". BBC News. 17 March 2011. 
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 31 August 2011. Retrieved 30 May 2011. 
  10. ^ "University for the Creative Arts - 404 - UCA". University for the Creative Arts. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  11. ^ "Guildford School of Art Archive". Archives.ucreative.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  12. ^ "Uni town status to lead to college expansion". Altonherald.com. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  13. ^ "Maidstone College". Socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  14. ^ "Canterbury College - UCA Archives". Ucaarchives.wordpress.com. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  15. ^ "Art Schools - UCA Archives". Ucaarchives.wordpress.com. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  16. ^ "IBEC – INDONESIA BRITAIN EDUCATION CENTRE  » Contact Us". Ibec.or.id. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  17. ^ "Epsom and Ewell Technical Institute and School of Art Archive Catalogue". Epsomandwellhistoryexplorer.org.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  18. ^ "NSEAD - International Journal of Art & Design Education". Nsead.org. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  19. ^ Wignall, Alice (1 June 2004). "What it's like to work at..." The Guardian. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  20. ^ "West Surrey College of Art and Design". Socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  21. ^ "Seven crowned with university college title". Timeshighereducation.com. 26 March 1999. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  22. ^ MacLeod, Donald (10 May 2005). "Art colleges to merge in push for university status". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  23. ^ "University College for the Creative Arts". The Guardian. 30 April 2008. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  24. ^ "Uni town status to lead to college expansion". Bordonherald.com. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  25. ^ "UCA - Top specialist arts uni for student satisfaction". UCA. Retrieved 2016-10-16. 
  26. ^ "University for the Creative Arts". Creativequarterfolkestone.org.uk. 1 July 2013. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  27. ^ "End of an artistic era as University for the Creative Arts in Maidstone prepares to pack up brushes for last time". Kent Online. Retrieved 2016-10-16. 
  28. ^ "UCA - Partnerships". UCA. Retrieved 2016-10-16. 
  29. ^ "Partnership with the University for the Creative Arts (UCA)". Oca.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  30. ^ "Search - UCAS". search.ucas.com. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  31. ^ "University for the Creative Arts - Levels of study - UCA". University for the Creative Arts. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  32. ^ "UCA Schools". Schools.ucreative.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  33. ^ "UCA - Research". Uca.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  34. ^ http://www.uca.ac.uk/news/gestures-resistance/
  35. ^ http://www.uca.ac.uk/business-school/
  36. ^ "University League Table 2019". The Complete University Guide. Retrieved 26 April 2018. 
  37. ^ "University league tables 2019". The Guardian. 29 May 2018. Retrieved 29 May 2018. 
  38. ^ "The Times and Sunday Times University Good University Guide 2018". Times Newspapers. Retrieved 24 September 2017. 
  39. ^ "Teaching Excellence Framework outcomes". Higher Education Funding Council for England. Retrieved 11 June 2018. 
  40. ^ "BBC NEWS - UK - England - Designer is university chancellor". News.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  41. ^ "BBC News Online - Grossman heads up uni governors". News.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  42. ^ "Rob Taylor, Author at The Financial Services Forum". Thefsforum.co.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  43. ^ "UCA vice chancellor Elaine Thomas in Honours list". Bbc.co.uk. 11 June 2011. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  44. ^ "University to keep community links in Kent and Surrey". Bbc.co.uk. 10 October 2011. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  45. ^ "UCA - COOKE Alan". Uca.ac.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  46. ^ "UCA appoints Professor Bashir Makhoul as Vice-Chancellor". Universitybusiness.co.uk. Retrieved 2 October 2017. 
  47. ^ https://www.imdb.com/name/nm3295899/?ref_=tt_ov_dr

External links[edit]