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Quicksilver (software)

Quicksilver is a utility app for macOS. Developed as proprietary freeware by Nicholas Jitkoff of Blacktree, Inc. it is now an open-source project hosted on GitHub. Quicksilver is a graphical shell for the macOS operating system, allowing users to use the keyboard to perform tasks such as launching other apps, manipulating files, or sending e-mail, it is similar to the macOS applications LaunchBar and Alfred, but uses a different interaction paradigm. Because of its flexible interface and extensibility, Quicksilver has been called one of the top productivity applications on the Mac. Invoked with a keyboard shortcut, Quicksilver has three panes, into which the user can enter an object, an action, an optional attribute—analogous to creating a sentence with a subject and object. Quicksilver is a background application that runs while the operating system is running, maintaining a "catalog" of files and objects on the user's computer. By applying incremental search as the user types, Quicksilver predicts the filename or action typed by the user and automatically selects the object.

Quicksilver uses a priority system based on prior usage to "learn" the user's habits requiring only a few letters for the most selected objects. Quicksilver allows users to define "triggers," which perform a specific command whenever a customizable keyboard shortcut is pressed. For instance, if a command opening the Documents folder is bound to the F7 key, this hotkey would trigger that action regardless of what application the user is in. Quicksilver has a built-in plug-in architecture, allowing the user to choose and install plug-ins providing integration with a specific program, interface, or new feature. For example, plug-ins exist for sending email via Mail without opening the application or manipulating images via text commands; because shell scripts and AppleScripts can be stored in the catalog, any function which can be performed with a script can be tied to Quicksilver through either the command window or triggers. Because most Apple-native applications have extensive scripting libraries, many common tasks can be performed from Quicksilver.

For instance, iTunes can be told to play or pause, increase or decrease the current track's rating, or skip to the previous or next track. There are various visual interfaces for Quicksilver, Constellation Menus supporting mouse gestures, a Notification Hub which supports Growl. Experimental trunk builds of Quicksilver, known as Alchemy, have many major changes. Triggers are moving to a separate product, called Catalyst All the little frameworks are being joined into one big one called Crucible; this includes extensions and core functionality that most plugins will use. This is called QSBase.framework The preferences will be simplified. There will be Extras-style advanced preferences for the fiddly options. Plugins are going to be hidden from most users, they'll activate themselves automatically or be installable from the web β5X Plugins are incompatible; these builds have four major components: Crucible, a framework with extension to AppKit and tools common to all Alchemy applications. Nicholas Jitkoff started development of Quicksilver in 2003.

He released several versions to the public until 2006 and maintained an internet forum for the tool from the beginning. On October 30, 2007, the source code for Quicksilver was made available via Google Code. In November 2009, development shifted to using GitHub. Quicksilver is now developed by a team of volunteers known collectively as QSApp. At the end of 2010, the new website QSApp.com was launched, with the aim of unifying and collating all of Quicksilver's fragmented builds and support groups. Since its launch, the site has included a new Plugins Repository and Downloads section. After several months of development, the milestone version β59 was released. On March 25, 2013, Quicksilver v1.0 was released after ten years of beta testing. Quicksilver's icon is based on the alchemical symbol for mercury, "quicksilver" being an archaic name for the element. Comparison of application launchers LaunchBar Alfred Butler Command line interface Official website Google Tech Talks presentation by Nicholas Jitkoff

History of Chianti

The history of Chianti dates back to at least the 13th century with the earliest incarnations of Chianti as a white wine. Today this Tuscan wine is one of Italy's recognizable wines. In the Middle Ages, the villages of Gaiole and Radda located near Florence formed as a Lega del Chianti creating an area that would become the spiritual and historical "heart" of the Chianti region and today is located within the Chianti Classico Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita; as the wines of Chianti grew in popularity other villages in Tuscany wanted their lands to be called Chianti. The boundaries of the region have seen many sub-divisions over the centuries; the variable terroir of these different macroclimates contributed to diverging range of quality on the market and by the late 20th century consumer perception of Chianti was associated with basic mass-market Chianti sold in a squat bottle enclosed in a straw basket, called fiasco. In addition to changing boundaries, the grape composition for Chianti has changed over the years.

The earliest examples of Chianti were a white wine but evolved into a red. Baron Bettino Ricasoli, the future Prime Minister in the Kingdom of Italy created the first known "Chianti recipe" in 1872, recommending 70% Sangiovese, 15% Canaiolo and 15% Malvasia bianca. In 1967, the Denominazione di origine controllata regulation set by the Italian government established the "Ricasoli formula" of a Sangiovese-based blend with 10-30% Malvasia and Trebbiano; however some producers desired to make Chianti that did not conform to these standards-such as a 100% variety Sangiovese wine, or all red wine grape varieties and with allowance for French grape varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot to be used. A few producers went ahead and made their "chianti" as they desired but, prohibited from labeling, sold them as simple vino da tavola. Despite their low level classifications, these "super Chiantis" became internationally recognized by critics and consumers and were coined as Super Tuscans; the success of these wines encouraged government officials to reconsider the DOCG regulations with many changes made to allow some of these vino da tavola to be labeled as Chiantis.

In the early Middle Ages, the area between Baliaccia and Monte Luco in the hills between the cities of Florence and Siena was known as the Chianti Mountain. This area was noted for its winemaking with the villages of Castellina and Radda gaining particular renown; these three villages formed a Lega del Chianti that the Florentine merchants would market as wines of distinction. In 1716 Cosimo III de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany issued an edict legislating that the three villages of the Lega del Chianti as well as the village of Greve and a 2-mile hillside north of Greve near Spedaluzza as the only recognized producers of Chianti; this delineation existed until July 1932, when the Italian government expanded the Chianti zone to include the outlying areas of Barberino Val d'Elsa, Robbiano, San Casciano in Val di Pesa and Strada. Some of these areas, such as Robbiano, included large swaths of hillside near Florence that produced lighter bodied wines that were not suitable for aging or improving in quality.

The 1932 expansion was canonized into DOC regulations in 1966. In 1984 the Chianti Classico and the greater Chianti region were separated and each given their own DOCG ranking; the boundaries were to cover an area of approximate 100 square miles between Florence to the north and Siena to the south. The four communes of Castellina, Gaiole and Radda were included along with parts of Barberino Val d'Elsa, San Casciano in Val di Pesa and Tavarnelle Val di Pesa in the province of Florence as well as Castelnuovo Berardenga and Poggibonsi in the province of Siena; the early history of Chianti is much intertwined with the history of the entire Tuscany region. The history of viticulture in the area dates back to its settlements by the Etruscans in the eighth century BC. Amphora remnants originating from the region show that Tuscan wine was exported to southern Italy and Gaul as early as the seventh century BC before both areas begun to cultivate grape vines themselves. From the fall of the Roman Empire and throughout the Middle Ages, monasteries were the main purveyors of wines in the region.

As the aristocratic and merchant classes emerged, they inherited the sharecropping system of agriculture known as mezzadria. This system took its name from the arrangement whereby the landowner provides the land and resources for planting in exchange for half of the yearly crop. Many landowners in the Chianti region would turn their half of the grape harvest into wine that would be sold to merchants in Florence; the earliest reference of Florentine wine retailers dates to 1079 with a guild for wine merchants being created in 1282. Unlike France or Spain, Italy did not have a robust export market for its wines during the Middle Ages, its closest trading partners and Austria, were separated from Italy by the massive Alps Mountains and had ample supply of their own local wines. The English had little interest in Italian wines at this point, finding plenty of sources in France and Portugal to quench their thirst. While the sweet Lacryma Christi from Campania had some presence on the international market, most Italian wines had to compete for taste of the local market.

This market was limited to the aristocracy since outside of the major cities of Rome and Naples, there was not yet a strong middle

Bobby Grayson

Bobby Grayson was an American football player. He was a two-time consensus All-American player who led the Stanford University football team to three consecutive Rose Bowl Games from 1933 to 1935. At Stanford, Grayson played for the varsity football team in the 1934 and 1935 seasons, he was recruited to Stanford by Coach Glenn "Pop" Warner and helped lead Stanford to a Pacific Coast Conference title in 1934 and co-championships in 1933 and 1935. He was a consensus All-American in both 1934 and 1935. Born in Portland, Grayson was a football and baseball star at Jefferson High School, he was state 100-yard dash champion in 1931 at 10.1 seconds, again in 1932 in 9.9 seconds with a career best of 9.8 seconds. Grayson won the 220-yard low hurdles state championship twice, in 1931 he won in 26.6 seconds, again in 1931 in 25.5 seconds. In football, he was a four year letterman playing fullback and defense while leading Jefferson to the 1931 City title and allowed no scores by opponents. In 1932, he was recruited to play football at Stanford by their legendary coach Pop Warner.

Grayson's 1932 freshman team included Bob Reynolds, Monk Moscrip and Bones Hamilton, came to be known as the "Vow Boys". The 1932 Stanford varsity team was soundly defeated by the USC Trojans. After watching the defeat, the freshmen players got together and vowed that they would never lose to the Trojans. In November 1933, Stanford defeated USC, Grayson scored the Reskins' only touchdown. Time magazine reported that "Stanford's speedy Fullback Bobby Grayson slashed and passed through the Trojan line, punched over a touchdown", resulting in a "resounding crash" for "the fattest Humpty Dumpty of 1933 football." The Stanford team proceeded to beat USC three straight years from 1933 to 1935 – making good on the vow. Stanford was the dominant team on the Pacific Coast, appearing in the New Year's Day Rose Bowl game in each of those three years. In three seasons, Grayson was part of a Stanford team that compiled a 25–4–2 record and became the first team to play in three consecutive Rose Bowls. In the 1934 Rose Bowl, Grayson rushed for a Rose Bowl record.

Ernie Nevers said Grayson was "the best back I've seen." Grayson set numerous Stanford records. He set the record for most interceptions in a single game with four in a 1934 game against the University of Washington, his career total of 1,547 rushing yards in 405 carries established a Stanford record that stood for 20 years. A historical account of Grayson's accomplishments published by the LA84 Foundation notes: Bobby Grayson had the looks of a matinee idol. A member of the legendary'Vow Boys' of Stanford, Grayson starred from 1933–1935 in an era, regarded as the greatest in the school's gridiron history. A workhorse ball carrier from the fullback spot, Grayson combined speed and power in piling up the school's career reusing record that stood for nearly two decades. Grayson used sprinter-class speed in sweeping the ends, his swivel-hipped moves eluded tacklers in the open field.. Sportswriter Grantland Rice wrote of Grayson: Here is a big, fast back who can run an end, hit a line, pass and handle any assignment given him.

Grayson was the 21st player drafted in the 1936 NFL Draft — the inaugural NFL draft. He did not play professional football. Grayson served as commanding officer of the minesweeper USS Loyalty in the Pacific during World War II. Grayson died of a heart ailment in 1981 at age 66 in Washington, he was survived by his wife, Sue Grayson, a son, Dan Grayson. In 2003, the Oakland Tribune ranked Grayson as one of Stanford's top ten players of all time, ranking him at number five behind Ernie Nevers, Jim Plunkett, Frankie Albert, John Elway. Bobby Grayson at the College Football Hall of Fame

Team Philips

Team Philips was a catamaran sailing vessel built to try to take Pete Goss around the world in record time. The design consisted of two thin, wave piercing hulls, each with its own sail, connected by high placed bridges between the hulls to minimise wave drag, it was built in Totnes, England to compete in The Race, a no-holds-barred drag race around the world. It was the biggest ocean racing yacht built, there was enough space between the hulls to park 80 cars. Overall dimensions were 70 ft wide and 135 ft tall, it pushed the boundaries and challenged the norms of ocean racing yachts in three main ways: 40-foot unsupported wave-piercing bow sections. Huge unstayed windsurfer-style rig. two masts mounted abeam of each other, one on each hull. It ran into trouble during its trials in March 2000 due to errors in the computer modelling of the composite hull; the first 40 feet of the port hull broke off. It was repaired with the addition of internal bracing, it suffered from problems with the pioneering bearings that supported the massive 130-foot-tall masts which required further repairs.

It was abandoned during a freak storm in the mid-Atlantic in December 2000. 70-knot winds and 10-metre waves started to produce cracks in the crew's central safety pod and forced Pete Goss to send out a mayday signal. He abandoned ship with the rest of his crew, the vessel broke up several days later. Team Philips yacht lost Scilly Archive - Team Philips BBC News - Team Philips back at sea National Maritime Museum Cornwall - Team Philips exhibition for 2005

2018–19 BYU Cougars women's basketball team

The 2018–19 BYU Cougars women's basketball team represented Brigham Young University during the 2018–19 NCAA Division I women's basketball season. It was head coach Jeff Judkins's eighteenth season at BYU; the Cougars, members of the West Coast Conference, play their home games at the Marriott Center. In 2019 the Cougars won the West Coast Conference tournament championship game over Gonzaga. In that tournament, Paisley Johnson was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player, they finished the season 26 -- 15 -- 3 in WCC play to finish in second round. In the NCAA Women's Tournament as a 7th seed in the Chicago regional they defeated Auburn in the first round before losing to Stanford in the second round. All Cougars home games are scheduled to be shown on TheW.tv powered by Stadium. Conference road games will be shown on TheW.tv. Most regular season road games will be streamed. Streaming partners for those games can be found on the schedule. Broadcasters: Robbie Bullough & Makenzi Pulsipher Starting Lineups: Dixie State: London Pavlica, Mariah Martin, Lisa VanCampen, Keslee Stevenson, Maile Richardson BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody Broadcasters: Jarom Jordan, Kristen Kozlowski, & Lauren McClain Series History: BYU leads series 2–0 Starting Lineups: UC Riverside: Marina Ewodo, Tianna Eaton, Keilanei Cooper, Jannon Otto, Daphne Gnago BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody Broadcasters: Robbie Bullough & Makenzi Pulsipher Series History: Cal leads series 4–0 Starting Lineups: Cal: Asha Thomas, Kianna Smith, Recee' Caldwell, Kristine Anigwe, Jaelyn Brown BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody Broadcasters: Robbie Bullough & Makenzi Pulsipher Series History: BYU leads series 4–1 Starting Lineups: Eastern Washington: Uriah Howard, Jessica McDowell-White, Violet Kapri Morrow, Brittany Klaman, Alissa Sealby BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody Broadcasters: Jaden Johnson Series History: BYU leads series 35–4 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody Utah State: Eliza West, Olivia West, Shannon Dufficy, Hailey Bassett-Meacham, Rachel Brewster Series History: BYU leads series 10–8 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody TCU: Amy Okonkwo, Jayde Woods, Lauren Heard, Jordan Moore, Kianna Ray Series History: First Meeting Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody Cal Baptist: Ane Olaeta, Emma Meriggioli, Delacy Brown, Tiena Afu, Britney Thomas Broadcasters: Kylee Young Series History: BYU leads series 18–3 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shalae Salmon, Maria Albiero, Paisley Johnson, Jasmine Moody Southern Utah: Rebecca Cardenas, Ashley Larsen, Megan Kamps, Breanu Reid, Hannah Robins Broadcasters: Matthew Baiamonte Series History: BYU leads series 8–0 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Caitlyn Alldredge, Paisley Johnson Utah Valley: Maria Carvalho, Eve Braslis, Alexis Cortez, Emma Jones, Jordan Holland Broadcasters: Krista Blunk & Rosalyn Gold-Onwude Series History: BYU leads series 63–42 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Caitlyn Alldredge, Paisley Johnson Utah: Megan Huff, Dru Gylten, Erika Bean, Daneesha Provo, Dre'Una Edwards Broadcasters: Spencer Linton & Lauren McClain Series History: BYU leads series 54–24 Starting Lineups: Colorado State: Taylor Mole, Lena Svanholm, Mollie Mounsey, Lore Devos, Tatum Neubert BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Broadcasters: Robbie Bullough Series History: BYU leads series 5–4 Starting Lineups: Northern Colorado: Krystal Leger-Walker, Savannah Smith, Alexis Chapman, Ali Meyer, Bridget Hintz BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Broadcasters: Joe Ritzo Series History: BYU leads series 15–2 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Santa Clara: Tia Hay, Joeseta Fatuesi, Lauren Yearwood, Ashlyn Herlihy, Emily Wolph Broadcasters: George Devine Series History: BYU leads series 17–5 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu San Francisco: Kia Vaalavirta, Marta Galic, Moa Lundqvist, Lucija Kostic, Shannon Powell Broadcasters: Spencer Linton & Kristen Kozlowski Series History: BYU leads series 17–2 Starting Lineups: Pepperdine: Malia Bambrick, Deezha Battle, Barbara Sitanggan, Skye Lindsay, Yasmine Robinson-Bac BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Broadcasters: Spencer Linton & Kristen Kozlowski Series History: BYU leads series 15–2 Starting Lineups: Loyola Marymount: Chelsey Gipson, Jasmine Jones, Bree Alford, Gabby Green, Cierra Belvin BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Broadcasters: Don Gubbins Series History: BYU leads series 13–4 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Pacific: Brooklyn McDavid, Isabel Newman, Jessica Blakeslee, Ameela Li, Valerie Higgins Broadcasters: Elias Feldman Series History: Saint Mary's leads series 9–8 Starting Lineups: BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Saint Mary's: Jasmine Forcadilla, Madeline Holland, Sydney Raggio, Sam Simons, Megan McKay Broadcasters: Spencer Linton & Kristen Kozlowski Series History: Gonzaga leads series 15–9 Starting Lineups: Gonzaga: Zykera Rice, LeeAnne Wirth, Laura Stockton, Katie Campbell, Chandler Smith BYU: Brenna Chase, Shaylee Gonzales, Shalae Salmon, Paisley Johnson, Babalu Ugwu Broadcasters: Spencer Linton & Kristen Kozlowski Series History: BYU leads series 22–4 Starting Lineups