WIND (AM)

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WIND
WIND 560theanswer logo.jpg
CityChicago, Illinois
Broadcast areaChicago metropolitan area
BrandingAM 560 The Answer
SloganNews. Opinion. Insight.
Frequency560 kHz
First air dateAugust 16, 1927[1]
FormatNews/Talk
Power5,000 watts
ClassB (Regional)
Facility ID67068
Transmitter coordinates41°33′54″N 87°25′11″W / 41.56500°N 87.41972°W / 41.56500; -87.41972Coordinates: 41°33′54″N 87°25′11″W / 41.56500°N 87.41972°W / 41.56500; -87.41972
Callsign meaningW - INDiana (originally licensed to Gary, Indiana)[2]
Former callsignsWJKS (1927-1933)[3]
AffiliationsSalem Radio Network
Fox News Radio
Premiere Networks
Northern Illinois Huskies (NCAA)
OwnerSalem Media Group
(Salem Media of Illinois, LLC)
Sister stationsWYLL
WebcastListen Live
Websitewww.560theanswer.com

WIND (AM 560) is a radio station based in Chicago, Illinois, broadcasting its talk radio format on 560 kHz. Studios are located in suburban Elk Grove Village, while it transmits from a four-tower array in Griffith, Indiana.

WIND is owned by Salem Media, a company specializing primarily in Christian radio.

Due to its location near the bottom of the AM dial, transmitter power, and the surrounding region's flat land, WIND's daytime signal provides at least secondary coverage to much of Illinois and Indiana, as well as southeastern Wisconsin.[4] At night, WIND's coverage into Indiana and Central Illinois is reduced, as its nighttime pattern concentrates its signal in the Chicago and Milwaukee areas.[5]

Programming[edit]

WIND is similar to many of Salem's other secular talk stations, airing Salem Radio Network hosts, including Dennis Prager, Hugh Hewitt, Mike Gallagher, and Larry Elder.[6] WIND also carries syndicated conservative talk shows, including The Sean Hannity Show and Jay Sekulow.[6] WIND also airs two local shows on weekdays, Chicago's Morning Answer with Amy Jacobson and Dan Proft mornings, and Joe Walsh evenings.[6]

Most programming on weekends is devoted to specialty talk shows and brokered programming.[7][8] WIND is the flagship station for Carl Amari's nationally syndicated nostalgia & showbiz program "Hollywood 360" which airs Saturday evenings.[9] National news headlines from Fox News Radio are aired hourly.

History[edit]

Early history[edit]

The station began broadcasting on August 16, 1927, holding the call sign WJKS, and was originally licensed to Gary, Indiana.[3][10][1] It initially operated at 1290 kHz, and shared time with WSBC,[3][10] its studio and transmitter were located in the Gay Mill Ballroom, in Gary's Miller Beach neighborhood.[1][3] The station was owned by the ballroom's owners, Thomas Johnson and Frances Kennedy.[1] In 1928, its frequency was changed to 1360 kHz, where it shared time with WGES.[3] Ralph Atlass purchased a 50% stake in the station in 1931.[11][1] In 1932, WJKS's studios were moved to the Gary State Bank Building.[3]

The station moved to its present 560 kHz frequency in 1933, after Chicago stations WIBO and WPCC, which had been operating at 560 kHz, were shut down;[3][12] the station began full-time operations, and ran 1,000 watts.[3] Its call sign was changed to WIND the same year.[3] In 1934, the station's daytime power was increased to 2,500 watts and in 1935 its daytime power was increased to 5,000 watts,[3] its nighttime power was increased to 5,000 watts in 1941.[3]

From the 1930s until 1985, WIND played "The Whiffenpoof Song" every night at 2 a.m.[13]

In 1944, WIND's studios were moved to Chicago's Carbide & Carbon Building, and in 1947 its studios were moved to the South tower of the Wrigley Building.[3]

In 1946, Ralph Atlass sold his stake in WIND to newspaper publisher John S. Knight for $800,000.[14] Atlass remained station manager of WIND.[14]

Popular music era[edit]

Eddie Hubbard began hosting a popular music program called the ABC Club in 1945.[15][16] By the late 1940s, much of the station's schedule was devoted to contemporary music.[16][17][18] WIND was Chicago's leading hit music station in the 1950s.[19][18]

Howard Miller was WIND's program director from 1945 to 1949.[1][20][21] In 1950, Miller started a longtime run as Chicago's top rated morning DJ.[20][21][22] Miller would remain Chicago's top rated radio personality until leaving the station in 1968.[20][21] Other WIND personalities during its music years included Jim Lounsbury,[23] Linn Burton,[13] Jay Trompeter,[24] Bernie Allen,[25] Lee Rogers,[26] Dick Williamson,[27] Perry Marshall,[28] Bruce Lee,[29] Kassidy,[30] Joel Sebastian,[31] Robert W. Morgan,[32] Chuck Benson and Kurt Russell,[33] Ron Britain,[34] Bob Del Giorno,[35] and Connie Szerszen.[36]

From 1945 to 1957, WIND held the exclusive local rights to broadcast Chicago Cubs baseball.[37] Sportscasters on WIND during this period included Bert Wilson, Milo Hamilton, and Jack Quinlan.[38]

In 1956, the station was sold to Westinghouse Broadcasting for $5.3 million, which at the time was a record amount for a radio station.[3][39][40] At the time of the purchase, WIND had no news department, though the station subscribed to wire services.[41] Westinghouse established a news department at the station, and it aired 5 minute newscasts every hour.[42][43][44] Earl Finckle was the station's meteorologist for a period.[45]

In the 1960s, WIND shifted to a middle of the road, pop contemporary/pop standards format.[46][47][48][43][44] In 1967, the station began adding some harder tracks to its playlist.[49][50] Phil Nolan became general manager of WIND in 1969.[51]

In 1971, WIND evolved into an oldies-heavy adult contemporary format, playing hits from 1955 to present day.[34][52] In addition to the music played on the station, WIND aired Contact, a nighttime talk show hosted by Dave Baum.[34][52][36] Larry "The Legend" Johnson hosted overnights.[52][53] Ed Schwartz served as a substitute host for Johnson, before replacing him as overnight host in 1973.[36][53] Schwartz had previously held several behind-the-scenes positions at WIND.[53] Schwartz continued as overnight host on WIND until 1981, when he moved to 720 WGN.[53]

In 1973, WIND won the George Foster Peabody Award for their series "From 18th Street: Destination Peking."[54]

First talk era[edit]

In September 1978, WIND switched to a news/talk format.[55] Local personalities included Clark Weber, Eddie Schwartz, Dave Baum, Steve King, and Jimmy Piersall.[56][57][58][59][60] Syndicated personalities heard on WIND included British-American talk show host Michael Jackson and Dr. Toni Grant;[59] the Larry King Show was heard overnight.[59][61]

Spanish era[edit]

In 1985, Westinghouse announced that they would sell WIND to Tichenor Radio for $6.85 million.[62] On December 12, 1985, at 1:03 p.m., on the same day of the closing of the sale to Tichenor, WIND officially signed off the air by playing "The Whiffenpoof Song" and "The Star-Spangled Banner".[13] Soon thereafter, WIND signed back on the air, with a Spanish language format;[63] the station aired Mexican mariachi and ranchera music and was branded "La Tremenda".[64][2][65] By the late 1990s, the station was airing a Spanish talk/romantica format.[66][67] In 1997, Tichenor Media merged with Heftel Broadcasting to form the Hispanic Broadcasting Corporation, which merged with Univision Communications in 2004.[68]

Second talk era[edit]

In 2004, Univision Radio announced a multi-station swap with Salem Communications;[69][70] this resulted in Salem acquiring WIND, while Univision Radio received 106.7 WZFS (now WPPN).[69][70]

On November 1, 2004, WIND once again became an English-language talk station,[71][72] its original line-up included Bill Bennett, Laura Ingraham, Dennis Prager, Michael Medved, Michael Savage, Hugh Hewitt, and Mike Gallagher.[71][72]

In July 2005, WIND entered into an agreement with the University of Illinois to carry Fighting Illini football and men's basketball games, as well as the coaches shows, through the Illini Sports Radio Network;[73] those broadcasts continued through the 2013 football season, with the Illini moving back to their longtime Chicago affiliate, WSCR.[73] WIND was formerly the alternate station of the Chicago Blackhawks and the Northwestern Wildcats in the case of scheduling conflicts at their flagship, WGN.[74]

On January 21, 2013, WIND rebranded as AM 560 The Answer, to follow suit with other Salem Communications-owned stations.[75]

In 2014, WIND became the Chicago radio home for Northern Illinois Huskies football.[74]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 211-220.
  2. ^ a b Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988/Spring-Summer 1989. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m History Cards for WIND, fcc.gov. Retrieved March 23, 2019.
  4. ^ "Predicted Daytime Coverage Area for WIND 560 AM", radio-locator.com. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  5. ^ "Predicted Nighttime* Coverage Area for WIND 560 AM", radio-locator.com. Retrieved April 1, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c "Program Guide: Tuesday, WIND. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  7. ^ "Program Guide: Saturday, WIND. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  8. ^ "Program Guide: Sunday, WIND. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  9. ^ Gire, Dann. "S. Barrington man builds career on radio's Golden Age", Daily Herald. September 11, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  10. ^ a b Annual Report of the Federal Radio Commission to the Congress of the United States for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 1927. Federal Radio Commission. United States Government Printing Office. 1927. Retrieved March 23, 2019.
  11. ^ "Deaths", Broadcasting. June 25, 1979. p. 95. Retrieved March 23, 2019.
  12. ^ "WIBO and WPCC Off Air But New Hearing Looming", Broadcasting. June 15, 1933. p. 14. Retrieved March 23, 2019.
  13. ^ a b c Smith, Wes. "A Chicago Voice Breaks With WIND Sign-Off", Chicago Tribune. December 13, 1985. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
  14. ^ a b "Knight Buys 42% WIND Stock From R. L. Atlass for $800,000", Broadcasting. February 4, 1946. pp. 17, 74. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  15. ^ "Vox Jox", Billboard. May 6, 1950. p. 28. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  16. ^ a b "Disk Jockey Hooper Ratings", Billboard. Special Disk Jockey Supplement. October 2, 1948. p. 74. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  17. ^ "Radio-TV Programs for Today" (PDF). Chicago Tribune. October 19, 1949. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  18. ^ a b Weber, Clark (2008). Clark Weber's Rock and Roll Radio: The Fun Years 1955-1975. Chicago's Books Press. p. 37.
  19. ^ WIND Top 21. WIND. October 12, 1957. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
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  21. ^ a b c "DJ Miller Denies WIND's Charge", Billboard. May 18, 1968. p. 26. Retrieved March 24, 2019.
  22. ^ "Howard Power". Time. 31 January 1969. Retrieved 11 May 2010.
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  30. ^ "Arnold—Visiting DJ", Billboard. August 14, 1965. p. 55. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  31. ^ "Retailing Panel", Billboard. October 30, 1961. p. 42. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  32. ^ Shannon, Bob. "Robert W. Morgan - Part Two", All Access Music Group. August 14, 2007. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  33. ^ Hall, Claude. "Vox Jox", Billboard. July 20, 1968. p. 20. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  34. ^ a b c Paige, Earl. "At WIND, It's Music, Talk of Today", Billboard. March 6, 1971. pp. 34, 36. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
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  36. ^ a b c WIND's Top 56 of 74. WIND. 1974. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
  37. ^ Shea, Stuart (2015). Calling the Game: Baseball Broadcasting from 1920 to the Present. SABR, Inc. p. 51. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  38. ^ Nidetz, Steve. "Hamilton's Trail to Coopertown", Chicago Tribune. August 2, 1992. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  39. ^ "$16 Million Station Sales Signed or Brewing in Week", Broadcasting. August 27, 1956. p. 27. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  40. ^ "WIND Control Shifts to WBC in Record $5.3 Million Deal", Broadcasting. December 24, 1956. p. 62. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  41. ^ Labor Arbitration Reports. Volume 40. The Bureau of National Affairs, 1963. p. 60.
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  45. ^ Lazare, Lewis. "Weather forecaster for Cubs", Chicago Sun-Times. July 6, 2009. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  46. ^ Biro, Nick. "Chicago Radio: Kings Remain Assumptive; Heirs Presumptive", Billboard. March 28, 1964. p. 12. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
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  48. ^ Biro, Nick. "'Eve of Destruction' Has Its Day", Billboard. August 21, 1965. p. 12. Retrieved March 29, 2019.
  49. ^ "WCFL Is Looking to Be No. 1", Billboard. September 30, 1967. p. 34. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
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  53. ^ a b c d Dahl, Bill. "Eddie Schwartz", Radio Chicago. Spring 1991. p. 32-33. Retrieved March 30, 2019.
  54. ^ "Winners – 1970s". Peabody Awards. Archived from the original on October 31, 2012. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  55. ^ Herbeck, Ray, Jr. "WIND Going Talk, So Other Chicago Stations Eye Audience", Billboard. July 29, 1978. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
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  69. ^ a b "Univision Radio and Salem Communications to Exchange Radio Assets", Business Wire. October 4, 2004. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  70. ^ a b "Univision Radio and Salem Communications to exchange assets", Dallas Business Journal. October 5, 2004. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
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  72. ^ a b "WIND changes direction as news/talk alternative", Radio & Records. November 5, 2004. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  73. ^ a b "Fighting Illini Basketball & Football Broadcasts Returning To WSCR-AM", Chicagoland Radio and Media. April 17, 2013. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  74. ^ a b Ecker, Danny. "NIU football jumps down the radio dial to WIND-AM", Crain's Chicago Business. August 11, 2014. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
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External links[edit]