Waseca County, Minnesota

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Waseca County, Minnesota
Waseca County Courthouse.jpg
Map of Minnesota highlighting Waseca County
Location within the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location within the U.S.
FoundedFebruary 27, 1857[1]
Named forWaseca (settlement)
SeatWaseca
Largest cityWaseca
Area
 • Total433 sq mi (1,121 km2)
 • Land423 sq mi (1,096 km2)
 • Water9.6 sq mi (25 km2), 2.2%
Population (est.)
 • (2018)18,691
 • Density44.4/sq mi (17.1/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneCentral: UTC−6/−5
Websitewww.co.waseca.mn.us

Waseca County is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 19,136,[2] its county seat is Waseca.[3]

History[edit]

In 1849 the newly organized Minnesota Territory legislature authorized nine counties across the territory. One of those, Dakota, was partially subdivided in 1853 to create Blue Earth, Le Sueur, and Rice counties. In 1855 portions of those counties were partitioned off to create Steele. Then on 27 February 1857, the territorial legislature authorized partitioning the west portion of Steele for the creation of Waseca County, with its seat at Wilton, a settlement which began in 1854; the county name was taken from the area's first farming settlement, started in 1855, near the present location of the city of Waseca. That settlement name came from the Dakota word meaning "rich," a reference to the fertile soil in the area.

The Winona and Saint Peter Railroad line past the town of Waseca was completed in the latter half of the 1860s, causing the town to bloom. By 1870 the vote was taken to relocate the county seat to that settlement.[4]

The Waseca County boundaries have not been diminished since the county's creation.

Geography[edit]

Soils of Waseca County[5]

The Le Sueur River flows westward through the county toward its confluence with the Blue Earth River in Blue Earth County, it is augmented by the Little Le Sueur which drains the southeast part of the county. Bull Run Creek flows westward from Silver Lake through the lower central part of the county into Blue Earth County; the Little Cobb River rises in southern Waseca County and flows westward into Blue Earth County to its confluence with the Cobb River.

The county terrain consists of low rolling hills, carved by drainages and dotted with lakes; the area is devoted to agriculture wherever possible.[6] The terrain slopes to the north and west, with its highest point near its southeast corner, at 1,240' (378m) ASL;[7] the county has an area of 433 square miles (1,120 km2), of which 423 square miles (1,100 km2) is land and 9.6 square miles (25 km2) (2.2%) is water.[8]

Waseca is one of seven southern Minnesota counties that have no forest ecosystems, only prairie and savanna soils exist in these counties.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Protected areas[6][edit]

  • Findley State Wildlife Management Area
  • Kanne State Wildlife Management Area
  • Moonan State Wildlife Management Area
  • Mueller State Wildlife Management Area
  • Senn-Rich State Wildlife Management Area
  • Teal State Wildlife Management Area
  • Waseca State Wildlife Management Area

Lakes[6][edit]

  • Buffalo Lake
  • Clear Lake
  • Everson Lake
  • Goose Lake
  • Hayes Lake
  • Knutsen Lake
  • Lake Elysian (part)
  • Lilly Lake
  • Lily Lake (part)
  • Loon Lake
  • Mott Lake
  • Reeds Lake
  • Reese Lake
  • Rice Lake (Janesville Township)
  • Rice Lake (Woodville Township)
  • Saint Olaf Lake
  • Sibert Lake
  • Silver Lake
  • Toners Lake
  • Trenton Lake (part)
  • Watkins Lake

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18602,601
18707,854202.0%
188012,38557.7%
189013,3137.5%
190014,76010.9%
191013,466−8.8%
192014,1335.0%
193014,4122.0%
194015,1865.4%
195014,957−1.5%
196016,0417.2%
197016,6633.9%
198018,44810.7%
199018,079−2.0%
200019,5268.0%
201019,136−2.0%
Est. 201818,691[9]−2.3%
US Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2018[2]

2000 census[edit]

Age pyramid of county residents based on 2000 United States Census data

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 19,526 people, 7,059 households, and 4,990 families in the county; the population density was 46.2/sqmi (17.8/km²). There were 7,427 housing units at an average density of 17.6/sqmi (6.78/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.65% White, 2.26% Black or African American, 0.59% Native American, 0.46% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.29% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. 2.90% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 47.6% were of German, 15.5% Norwegian, 7.4% Irish and 5.5% American ancestry.

There were 7,059 households out of which 34.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.00% were married couples living together, 7.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.30% were non-families. 25.10% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.07.

The county population contained 25.80% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 30.00% from 25 to 44, 21.30% from 45 to 64, and 14.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 109.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 111.30 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,440, and the median income for a family was $50,081. Males had a median income of $34,380 versus $22,630 for females; the per capita income for the county was $18,631. About 4.50% of families and 6.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.80% of those under age 18 and 5.80% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Politics[edit]

Waseca County has traditionally voted Republican. In only three national elections since 1936 has the county selected the Democratic Party candidate (as of 2016).

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 61.8% 5,967 29.4% 2,838 8.8% 848
2012 52.5% 5,116 44.8% 4,370 2.7% 261
2008 52.7% 5,211 44.5% 4,401 2.8% 276
2004 55.7% 5,457 42.6% 4,179 1.7% 164
2000 52.0% 4,608 41.7% 3,694 6.3% 562
1996 37.4% 3,171 45.1% 3,819 17.5% 1,482
1992 34.6% 3,118 34.9% 3,146 30.4% 2,742
1988 54.0% 4,471 44.9% 3,721 1.2% 95
1984 60.6% 5,509 38.8% 3,527 0.6% 55
1980 51.6% 4,801 38.0% 3,535 10.4% 965
1976 52.0% 4,582 45.5% 4,002 2.5% 221
1972 63.9% 5,064 34.9% 2,767 1.2% 95
1968 56.4% 4,292 40.2% 3,057 3.4% 256
1964 49.5% 3,570 50.3% 3,633 0.2% 14
1960 63.4% 4,838 36.6% 2,793 0.1% 5
1956 67.7% 4,663 32.2% 2,215 0.2% 11
1952 69.8% 4,962 30.0% 2,132 0.3% 19
1948 52.6% 3,511 46.7% 3,120 0.7% 49
1944 65.0% 4,146 34.6% 2,207 0.4% 22
1940 62.6% 4,515 37.1% 2,673 0.4% 25
1936 39.1% 2,482 55.5% 3,520 5.5% 346
1932 34.1% 2,012 64.5% 3,805 1.5% 86
1928 56.9% 3,251 42.4% 2,418 0.7% 41
1924 37.1% 2,081 7.9% 442 55.0% 3,082
1920 71.8% 3,626 24.9% 1,257 3.3% 168
1916 54.1% 1,522 41.9% 1,178 4.0% 113
1912 20.5% 553 39.4% 1,062 40.1% 1,079[15]
1908 55.0% 1,455 41.0% 1,085 4.0% 106
1904 70.1% 1,714 25.8% 631 4.1% 99
1900 58.5% 1,744 38.7% 1,155 2.8% 84
1896 58.8% 1,902 38.5% 1,244 2.8% 89
1892 44.9% 1,090 42.9% 1,042 12.3% 298

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minnesota Place Names". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved March 19, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Upham, Warren (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. p. 564. Retrieved 22 April 2019.
  5. ^ Nelson, Steven (2011) Savanna Soils of Minnesota. Minnesota: Self. pp. 43-48. ISBN 978-0-615-50320-2.
  6. ^ a b c Waseca County MN Google Maps (accessed 22 April 2019)
  7. ^ "Find an Altitude/Waseca County MN" Google Maps (accessed 22 April 2019)
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on October 6, 2014. Retrieved October 25, 2014.
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 2, 2019.
  10. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 25, 2014.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 25, 2014.
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 25, 2014.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 25, 2014.
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 10 October 2018.
  15. ^ The leading "other" candidate, Progressive Theodore Roosevelt, received 940 votes, while Socialist candidate Eugene Debs received 63 votes, Prohibition candidate Eugene Chafin received 62 votes, and Socialist Labor candidate Arthur Reimer received 14 votes.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 44°01′N 93°35′W / 44.02°N 93.59°W / 44.02; -93.59