Wilshire/Vermont station

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Wilshire/Vermont
Red Line  Purple Line 
HSY- Los Angeles Metro, Wilshire-Vermont, Upper Platform.jpg
Metrorail-red4.jpg
Top: View of upper floor platform bound for Union Station
Bottom: View of lower floor platform bound for North Hollywood Station (Red Line) or Wilshire/Western Station (Purple Line)
Location3191 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90005
Coordinates34°03′25″N 118°16′35″W / 34.0570°N 118.2763°W / 34.0570; -118.2763Coordinates: 34°03′25″N 118°16′35″W / 34.0570°N 118.2763°W / 34.0570; -118.2763
Owned byMetro
Line(s)Red Line Red Line 
Purple Line Purple Line 
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks2
Connections"Kiss & Ride" passenger drop-off area
Construction
Parkingnone
Bicycle facilities14 bike rack spaces
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Statusin service
History
OpenedJuly 13, 1996; 22 years ago (July 13, 1996)
Services
Preceding station   LAMetroLogo.svg Metro Rail   Following station
Red Line
Purple Line
The main entrance of the station.

Wilshire/Vermont is a heavy-rail subway station in the Los Angeles Metro system. It is located at Wilshire Boulevard and Vermont Avenue, in Los Angeles' Mid-Wilshire/Koreatown District; this station is served by the Red Line and the Purple Line.[1]

Location[edit]

As its name implies, Wilshire/Vermont station is located at the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard and Vermont Avenue; the station itself is slightly to the east of the intersection, allowing diverging Red Line trains to head north underneath Vermont. A number of educational institutions, including Southwestern University and the Robert F Kennedy Community Schools, are located nearby.

Transit-oriented development[edit]

Above the station is the Wilshire Vermont Station mixed-use transit village development, a $136-million apartment and retail complex designed by the architecture firm Arquitectonica and developed by Urban Partners and MacFarlane Partners on land owned by the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority; the development opened in 2007 and includes apartments, retail, and (as of 2009) an adjacent middle school.[2][3] The property is managed by Greystar Real Estate Partners.

Station layout[edit]

G Street Level Exit/Entrance
B1 Southbound/Eastbound Red Line Red Line  toward Union Station (Westlake/MacArthur Park)
Purple Line Purple Line  toward Union Station (Westlake/MacArthur Park)
Split platform, doors will open on the right
Mezzanine faregates, ticket machines
B2 Northbound/Westbound Red Line Red Line  toward North Hollywood (Vermont/Beverly)
Purple Line Purple Line  toward Wilshire/Western (Wilshire/Normandie)
Split platform, doors will open on the left
Wilshire/Vermont Station is known to have the longest escalator in the United States west of the Mississippi River.[4]

The station is located where the Red Line and Purple Line converge on their way to Downtown Los Angeles; the station is designed with two platform levels: eastbound Purple and Red Line trains (to Union Station) use the upper level, and westbound Purple (to Wilshire/Western) and Northbound Red (to North Hollywood) trains use the lower level.

The upper platform's pillar art.
The lower platform's pillar art.

Artwork[edit]

The artwork at the station depicts typographic letters and symbols designed by Bob Zoell; the letters on the pillars of the lower platform spell out "going by-by", what the red line and its patrons do when they zoom in and out of the station. Addition artwork at the station is the creation of Peter Shire; the Wilshire/Vermont station also contains the two longest continuous escalators in the state of California (in fact, west of the Mississippi;[4] these escalators stretch from the ground level to the lower platform of the Wilshire/Vermont station.

Bus connections[edit]

Popular culture[edit]

In 2009, a sign listing the Wilshire/Vermont station was used in a Geico "It's So Easy A Caveman Could Do It" commercial featuring the song "Let Me Be Myself" by Three Doors Down.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Purple Line station information". Metro.
  2. ^ "People and Places: Los Angeles 2007.1016", Architecture Week, October 16, 2007 (accessed February 23, 2010).
  3. ^ Christopher Hawthorne, " Just keep your distance: The Wilshire Vermont Station is dramatic from far away. A walk in its courtyard exposes its flaws.", Los Angeles Times, October 3, 2007.
  4. ^ a b Hymon, Steve (August 11, 2014). "Transportation headlines, Monday, August 11". The Source. Metro. Retrieved 2014-08-11.

External links[edit]