Wind power in Turkey

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Wind power in Turkey is gradually expanding in capacity, mainly in the Aegean and Marmara regions. As of July 2017, Turkey had about 6,5 GW of installed capacity and a further 808 MW under construction.[1] The technical wind energy potential is estimated to be about 114 GW of capacity in regions where the wind speed is higher than 7.0 meters above the ground at 50 meters’ height.[2]

History[edit]

Bozcaada Wind Farm, Çanakkale province

The first wind farm was built in Izmir in 1998.[3]

In 2006, 19 MW of wind power was installed, and in 2007, capacity increased to almost 140 MW.[4] According to Transmission Reports, the capacity rose to 1,265 MW at the end of 2010 and 1,645.30 MW by October, 2011.

Current and planned capacity[edit]

As of 2016, there were 172 wind farms in Turkey, of which 171 were active in production. The total installed power was 5.789 GW, and the wind farms generated a total of 15.370 TWh of electrical energy the same year. Following the completion of the licensed facilities, the total wind power will reach 6.828 GW. In addition, there were 74 licensed wind farms with a capacity of 1.283 GW in the planning stage. The combined capacity of the completed and planned facilities will reach 10.851 GW, which will meet 12% of the demand for electricity consumption. The governmental Energy Market Regulatory Authority (Turkish: Enerji Piyasası Denetleme Kurulu, EPDK) has announced that it will accept requests for the building of wind farm,s totaling up to 3 GW installed power cpacity, until the end of 2018.[3]

A total of 1,330 wind turbines are currently in place in Turkey, which saves the country an additional $500 million on natural gas.[5] About 10GW has been licensed to be installed in total.[1]

Project YEKA[edit]

In 2017, the Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources launched a project for wind power investment amounting to US$ 1 billion, and issued a request for tender. The project, titled YEKA (Turkish: Yenilenebilir Enerji Kaynak Alanları or Renewable Energy Resource Areas), comprises the building of wind farms in five different regions in the country with a total power capacity of 1,000 MW and at least 3 billion kWh energy generated annually.[6]

On August 3, 2017, the German-Turkish consortium of Siemens-Türkerler-Kalyon offered the lowest bid at 0.0348 US$ per kWh for the delivery of electricity to the national grid. The consortium will carry out R&D work, for ten years, on wind turbine blades, generator design, material technologies and production techniques, software and innovative gearboxes. The R&D activities will be performed by fifty technical personnel consisting of 80% domestic engineers, with a budget of US$ 5 million per year.[6]

Economics[edit]

Renewable energy law includes fairly attractive incentives for wind power plants in Turkey.[7]

Statistics[edit]

The installed capacity was 51 MW in 2006 and it is increased to the 4,498 MW in 2015. Wind power in Turkey is increasing rapidly but the desired level of installed capacity has not been reached because the wind potential is very high in Turkey.[2]

Wind farm annual electricity generation and percent of total consumption[3][8]
Year GWh %
1998
6
0.0050
1999
21
0.02
2000
33
0.03
2001
62
0.05
2002
48
0.04
2003
61
0.04
2004
58
0.04
2005
59
0.04
2006
127
0.07
2007
355
0.19
2008
847
0.43
2009
1,495
0.77
2010
2,916
1.39
2011
4,724
2.05
2012
5,861
2.42
2013
7,558
3.04
2014
8,367
3.25
2015
11,652
4.39
2016
15,370
5.59
2017
17,716
6.10

Installed wind power capacity by province (As of August 1, 2016)[3]

  Balıkesir (18.2%)
  Izmir (17.2%)
  Manisa (10.7%)
  Hatay (7.1%)
  Çanakkale (6.1%)
  Osmaniye (4.7%)
  Aydın (4.0%)
  Istanbul (3.6%)
  Kayseri (3.6%)
  Kırşehir (3.0%)
  Other (21.8%)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Turkish wind energy statistics report" (PDF). Tureb.com. July 2017. Retrieved 18 October 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Dawood, Kamran (2016). "Hybrid wind-solar reliable solution for Turkey to meet electric demand". Balkan Journal of Electrical and Computer Engineering. 4 (2): 62–66. doi:10.17694/bajece.06954. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Rüzgar Enerji Santralleri" (in Turkish). Enerji Atlası. Retrieved 2017-08-04. 
  4. ^ Turkey Looks to Exploit Wind Energy Potential
  5. ^ Albayrak, Aydin (24 October 2013). "Foreign governments consult Turkey on energy market". www.TodaysZaman.com. Archived from the original on 2013-10-27. Retrieved 18 October 2017. 
  6. ^ a b "YEKA ihalesi sonuçlandı! İşte kazanan grup". Hürriyet (in Turkish). 2017-08-03. Retrieved 2017-08-04. 
  7. ^ "The Current Situation of Wind Energy in Turkey". 
  8. ^ "TÜRKİYE ELEKTRİK ENERJİSİ İSTATİSTİKLER" (in Turkish). Elektrik Mühendisleri Odası. Retrieved 2018-08-06.