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Wisden Cricketers of the Year

The Wisden Cricketers of the Year are cricketers selected for the honour by the annual publication Wisden Cricketers' Almanack, based on their "influence on the previous English season". The award began in 1889 with the naming of "Six Great Bowlers of the Year", continued with the naming of "Nine Great Batsmen of the Year" in 1890 and "Five Great Wicket-Keepers" in 1891. Since 1897, with a few notable exceptions, the annual award has recognised five players of the year. No players were named in 1916 or 1917, as the First World War prevented any first-class cricket being played in England, while in 1918 and 1919 the recipients were five schoolboy cricketers. From 1941 to 1946, the Second World War caused no players were named. Three players have been sole recipients: Plum Warner and Jack Hobbs; the latter two selections are the only exceptions to the rule that a player may receive the award only once. Hobbs was first recognised in 1909, but was selected a second time in 1926 to honour his breaking W. G. Grace's record of 126 first-class hundreds.

John Wisden and eponymous founder of the almanack, was featured in a special commemorative section in the Jubilee edition of the publication in 1913, 29 years posthumously. From 2000 to 2003 the award was made based on players' impact on cricket worldwide rather than just the preceding season in England, but the decision was reversed in 2004 with the introduction of a separate Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World award; the earliest surviving recipient of the award is Sonny Ramadhin, which he became in August 2015 with the death of Arthur Morris. The longest that a recipient has lived after receiving the award is 77 years by Harry Calder, who died in 1995. Calder, uniquely for a male recipient, played no first-class cricket. Among first-class players, the longest lived after receipt of the award is 74 years by Wilfred Rhodes. Six women have been chosen: Claire Taylor, Charlotte Edwards, Heather Knight, Natalie Sciver, Anya Shrubsole and Tammy Beaumont. Wisden Leading Cricketer in the World Wisden Leading Woman Cricketer in the World Six Giants of the Wisden Century Wisden Australia's Cricketer of the Year Wisden Cricketers of the Century ICC Awards General "Wisden's Five Cricketers of the Year".

Wisden. Retrieved 10 April 2013. Specific Wisden online archive Full List on Cricinfo

Pacific Audio Visual Institute

Pacific Audio Visual Institute was a private educational institution that specializes in music production and music management located in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. PAVI offers one-year diploma programs in Audio Engineering & Production and Music Business Management. PAVI differs from other institutions in that classes are taught within an operating, full-service, professional studio complex. Pacific Audio Visual Institute is accredited by the Private Career Training Institutions Agency of British Columbia. PAVI has been Awarded British Columbia’s Education Quality Assurance Designation; the EQA helps identify which provincial post-secondary institutions have met government assurance standards and offer consumer protection. Each year PAVI awards more than $100,000 in scholarships. Students have the opportunity to gain practical experience in their industry through PAVI's internship placement program; the school offers assistance and resources for International Students. With Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

The Audio Engineering & Production program offers provides hands-on training in music production and sound engineering. Students learn in a commercial recording studio with professional audio engineers and instructors who have active careers in the industry. Courses include Recording, Mixing, Record Production, Electronic Music, Digital Audio Workstation, Audio for Video, Live Sound, Studio Design, Digital Signal Processing and Career Management. Music Business Management program provides the education necessary for a business career in the entertainment industry. Students learn hands-on with industry professionals. Courses include Marketing & Promotion, Independent Label, Artist Development and Management, Industry Contracts, Record Production, Music Publishing, Social Media Management; this program offers a Music Video course and students have full access to the school's film gear for their own projects. Program shuttered prematurely in 2012. Pacific Audio Visual Institute home page PAVI Grads Speak Out PAVI Campus News Facebook page Twitter page School Reviews PAVI Grads Get Jobs!

Post-Graduation Work Permit Program in British Columbia

Blue Jay (film)

Blue Jay is a drama romance film directed by Alex Lehmann in his fictional feature debut, from a screenplay by Mark Duplass. It stars Sarah Paulson; the film had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 12, 2016. The film was released on October 7, 2016, in a limited release prior to being released through video on demand on October 11, 2016. Jim Henderson returns to his hometown in California with the intention of renovating and selling his late mother's house. While shopping at a supermarket, he bumps into his former high school girlfriend Amanda; the two greet each other. He bumps into her again in the parking lot and the two decide to go for coffee at a place called Blue Jay; the two discuss. Amanda became the stepmother to two children. Jim is working on building houses with his uncle and thinking about renovating his late mother's house. While walking Amanda to her car, the two pass a liquor store they went to in their younger days. Amanda bets that the store owner will recognize them from when they were younger, although Jim disagrees.

To Amanda's satisfaction, the store owner does remember the two. He remarks about how the two "famous lovebirds" are still together after two decades and gives them free beers and gummy bears, while Amanda and Jim jokingly play along about how they are still a couple after all this time; the two further discuss their current lives in depth by a lake, leaving Jim crying and feeling discontented about his life when he hears of how impressive Amanda's life sounds. The two visit his mother's house. While rummaging through old memorabilia, Amanda discovers a letter addressed to her written years ago, she decides to keep it. Amanda finds tape recordings of Jim and her roleplaying their middle-aged lives, they play the recordings and laugh about how uncool they were. Jim proposes they have some "fun" and they decide to recreate the tape, pretending to be a married couple celebrating their 20th anniversary. At the end of the night, Amanda confesses to Jim she is on anti-depressants and that she has not cried in years.

The two share a kiss that leads to making out in the bedroom. But things are stopped, it is revealed that Amanda had an abortion back in high school and, the cause of their separation. They lash out at each other, crying on the floor. Jim walks Amanda to her car the next morning, Amanda explains her decision. Jim asks her to read the letter. Amanda begins to cry, for the first time in 5 years, they laugh about it together. Jim and Amanda sigh at one another and the screen cuts to black. Mark Duplass as Jim Henderson Sarah Paulson as Amanda Clu Gulager as Waynie The film was shot over the course of 7 days in and around Crestline, California. Julian Wass composed the film's score; the film marked the Duplass Brothers' first film under their deal with Netflix. The film had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 12, 2016. Prior to, The Orchard acquired distribution rights to the film, set the film for an October 7, 2016, limited release before opening through video on demand on October 11, 2016.

It was released on Netflix on December 6, 2016. Blue Jay received positive reviews from film critics, it holds a 92% approval rating on review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes, based on 24 reviews, with an average rating of 7.3/10. On Metacritic, the film holds a rating of 69 out of 100, based on 16 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews"; the Canadian Press reporter David Friend said the film "manages to capture the spirit of 1990s indie filmmaking at its finest, offers some heartbreaking surprises along the way." And Brian Tallerico of RogerEbert.com praised Paulson's performance saying the film "features one of our best actresses in the kind of role she doesn't get to play that often." Blue Jay on IMDb Blue Jay at Rotten Tomatoes Blue Jay at Metacritic Blue Jay at Box Office Mojo

William Usborne Moore

Vice admiral William Usborne Moore known as W. Usborne Moore was a British naval commander, psychical researcher and spiritualist. Moore worked as a naval surveyor, serving in Fiji and China. In 1877, he married Maria Gertrude in New South Wales, he developed an interest in spiritualism. Moore had a long history of defending fraudulent mediums as genuine, he endorsed the direct voice medium Etta Wriedt. He defended the Bangs Sisters and stated that the psychical investigator Hereward Carrington had never visited their house or exposed their tricks. After Carrington gave incontrovertible evidence that he had visited their house and caught them in fraud, Moore had to retract his charges. In 1906, Moore attended a séance with the British materialization medium Frederick G. Foster Craddock. A small electric torch used to produce'spirit' lights was discovered in a drawer during a séance by Moore. Despite admitting the fraud of the incident, Moore still endorsed the mediumship of Craddock, stating that his trance control "Graem" was a malicious spirit.

Moore endorsed the American materialization medium Joseph Jonson from Toledo, Ohio. He claimed to have observed materialized spirits emerge from the cabinet during a séance in his book Glimpses of the Next State. Jonson was exposed as a fraud by James Hewat McKenzie who discovered that Jonson's daughter had dressed up as a spirit. In 1907, Hereward Carrington attended séances with Jonson at Lily Dale, New York and concluded "on several occasions, the fraud was apparent, that I was enabled to follow the process of materialisation and dematerialisation with ease. Everything was the most obvious and simple trickery, seen to be such."The spiritualist Arthur Conan Doyle described Moore as "among the greatest of psychic researchers". However, Moore was criticized by psychical researchers. Science historian William Hodson Brock has described Moore as a "credulous spiritualist"; the Cosmos and the Creeds: Elementary Notes on the Alleged Finality of the Christian Faith Glimpses of the Next State The Voices Spirit Identity by the Direct Voice Anonymous..

Exposures of Mr. Craddock. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research 12: 274-277

Rugby League Reserve Team Championship

The Rugby League Reserve Team Championship is a rugby league competition for the reserve teams of the British-based Super League clubs. Having a reserve team is a compulsory part of the minimum criteria to hold a Super League licence, but Catalans Dragons have dispensation to run their reserve team in the French Elite League for logistical reasons; the Rugby League Reserve Team First Division is a rugby league competition for the reserve teams of Championship clubs, although there is no longer an obligation for clubs in the Championship to enter a reserve team. The previous competition for reserve teams was known as the Alliance and on occasion featured the first teams of non-league semi-professional clubs including Hemel Stags and Blackpool Gladiators; the current competition was formed in 2006 as a replacement for the Senior Academy competition for under-21s. Unlike the Senior Academy, which had a grading phase to divide teams into the Championship and First Division based on playing strength of the Senior Academy side, the Reserve Team Championship is for the reserve teams of Super League clubs and the Reserve Team First Division is for the reserve teams of Championship clubs.

In 2007 and 2008 there was an obligation for National League One clubs to run a reserve team (with Celtic Crusaders getting dispensation in 2008 to run theirs in the Rugby League Conference National Division, this has been dropped for the 2009 season, resulting in a smaller First Division. In 2010 the Championship will change to a Super League under-20s and the First Division will remain as a Championship Reserve division. In 2011 the Championship reserve competition became U23 albeit with five over age players allowed. In 2013 the Championship U23 had only four entrants so it was agreed that they could play games between them under the U23 rules and other games would be U20 with two over age players. With teams playing uneven numbers of games the league will be a merit league. Featherstone Rovers Halifax Hemel Stags Keighley Cougars Leigh Centurions Oldham Rochdale Hornets Salford City Reds South Wales Scorpions York City Knights Featherstone Rovers Reserves Halifax Reserves Keighley Cougars Reserves Oldham Reserves Sheffield Eagles Reserves York City Knights Reserves Dewsbury Rams Reserves Featherstone Rovers Reserves Halifax Reserves Keighley Cougars Reserves Leigh Centurions Reserves Oldham Reserves Sheffield Eagles Reserves Whitehaven Reserves Widnes Vikings Reserves York City Knights Reserves Dewsbury Rams Reserves Featherstone Rovers Reserves Hunslet Hawks Reserves Keighley Cougars Reserves Leigh Centurions Reserves Oldham Reserves Sheffield Eagles Reserves Whitehaven Reserves Widnes Vikings Reserves York City Knights Reserves NB: Barrow Raiders Reserves entered but failed to complete the season Bradford Bulls Reserves Castleford Tigers Reserves Crusaders Reserves Harlequins Reserves Huddersfield Giants Reserves Hull F.

C. Reserves Hull Kingston Rovers Reserves Leeds Rhinos Reserves St. Helens Reserves Salford City Reds Reserves Wakefield Trinity Wildcats Reserves Warrington Wolves Reserves Wigan Warriors Reserves Barrow Raiders Reserves Dewsbury Rams Reserves Doncaster Reserves Featherstone Rovers Reserves Hunslet Hawks Reserves Keighley Cougars Reserves Leigh Centurions Reserves Oldham Reserves Sheffield Eagles Reserves Whitehaven Reserves Widnes Vikings Reserves York City Knights Reserves Championship: First Division: Championship: First Division: Championship: Wigan Warriors First Division: Widnes Vikings Championship: Bradford Bulls, Castleford Tigers, Huddersfield Giants, Hull FC, Leeds Rhinos, St Helens, Salford City Reds, Wakefield Trinity Wildcats, Warrington Wolves, Wigan Warriors First Division: Batley Bulldogs, Dewsbury Rams, Doncaster Lakers, Featherstone Rovers, Hull Kingston Rovers, Hunslet Hawks, Keighley Cougars, Leigh Centurions, Widnes Vikings, York City Knights Championship: Bradford Bulls, Huddersfield Giants, Hull FC, Hull Kingston Rovers Leeds Rhinos, St Helens, Salford City Reds, Wakefield Trinity Wildcats, Warrington Wolves, Wigan Warriors First Division: Barrow Vikings, Batley Bulldogs, Castleford Tigers, Dewsbury Rams, Doncaster Lakers, Featherstone Rovers, Hunslet Hawks, Keighley Cougars, Leigh Centurions, Rochdale Hornets, Sheffield Eagles, Swinton Lions, Widnes Vikings, Workington Town, York City Knights Championship: Bradford Bulls, Castleford Tigers Harlequins, Huddersfield Giants, Hull FC, Hull Kingston Rovers Leeds Rhinos, St Helens, Wakefield Trinity Wildcats, Warrington Wolves, Wigan Warriors First Division: Barrow Vikings, Batley Bulldogs, Dewsbury Rams, Featherstone Rovers, Hunslet Hawks, Keighley Cougars, Leigh Centurions, Rochdale Hornets, Salford City Reds, Sheffield Eagles, Widnes Vikings, Workington Town, York City Knights Super League Official website Championship official website Up to date Championship table on RFL official website Up to date First Division table on RFL website

Ralph Richardson (politician born 1812)

Dr Ralph Richardson was a Member of the New Zealand Legislative Council. He lived in New Zealand for less than a decade, retired to Devon in England, to London. Richardson was born in Capenhurst, England in 1812, he was educated at Chester Grammar School, at the University of Edinburgh, graduating with an MD, Downing College, Cambridge. Aged 28, he married a daughter of George Turner Seymour of Wraxall, Somerset, they first settled in Meadowbank near Blenheim. Arthur Seymour, Marie's brother, settled in Picton. Henry Seymour, who returned to Nelson on that ship, was unrelated. By 1854, the Richardsons were living in Nelson. Richardson was appointed to the Legislative Council on 31 December 1853, he was a Member of the Executive Council in the first Fox Ministry from 24 May to 2 June 1856. He resigned from the Legislative Council on 13 December 1856; the Richardsons returned to England in 1858. According to Henry Sewell's diary, "Mrs Richarson like New Zealand, but the want of Servants the one intolerable grievance."

They bought an estate in Devon. His wife died in 1880, he moved to London. After his son Ralph died in Nelson on 22 December 1889, he took in his daughter-in-law and her two small girls. Richardson died in 1897 or 1898. SourcesRichardson, Lesley. "Ralphine Richardson". Journal of the Nelson and Marlborough Historical Societies. Nelson Historical Society. 2. Retrieved 21 June 2015. Scholefield, Guy, ed.. A Dictionary of New Zealand Biography: M–Addenda. II. Wellington: Department of Internal Affairs. Retrieved 21 June 2015. Sewell, Henry. W. David McIntyre; the Journal of Henry Sewell 1853–7: Volume II. Christchurch: Whitcoulls Publishers. ISBN 0 7233 0625 7. Wilson, James Oakley. New Zealand parliamentary record, 1840-1984. Wellington: V. R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103