click links in text for more info
SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Yukon Legislative Assembly

The Yukon Legislative Assembly is the legislative assembly for Yukon, Canada. The Yukon Legislative Assembly is the only legislature in Canada's three federal territories, organized along political party lines. In Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, the legislative assemblies are instead elected on a non-partisan consensus government model. From 1900 to 1978, the elected legislative body in Yukon was the Yukon Territorial Council, a body which did not act as the primary government, but was a non-partisan advisory body to the Commissioner of the Yukon. Following the passage of the Yukon Elections Act in 1977, the Territorial Council was replaced by the current Legislative Assembly, elected for the first time in the 1978 election. Italicized text indicates a member of cabinet. Bold text indicates a party leader. Both indicates the Premier of Yukon List of Speakers of the Yukon Legislative Assembly List of Yukon general elections

Joanna Trollope

Joanna Trollope is an English writer. She has written under the pseudonym of Caroline Harvey, her novel Parson Harding's Daughter won in 1980 the Romantic Novel of the Year Award by the Romantic Novelists' Association. Trollope was born on 9 December 1943 in her grandfather's rectory in Minchinhampton, England, daughter of Rosemary Hodson and Arthur George Cecil Trollope, her father was an Oxford University classics graduate who became head of a small building society and a painter. Her mother was an writer, her father was away for war service in India. The family settled in Reigate, where she was eldest of three children. Trollope was educated at Reigate County School for Girls, followed by a 1961 scholarship to St Hugh's College, Oxford where she read English, her father was of the same family as the Victorian novelist Anthony Trollope. Of inheriting the name, she has said: "Oddly my name has been no professional help at all! It seems to have made no difference... I admire him hugely, both for his benevolence and his enormous psychological perception".

From 1965 to 1967, she worked at the Commonwealth Office. While a civil servant, she researched Eastern Europe and the relations between China and the developing world. From 1967 to 1979, she was employed in a number of teaching posts before she became a writer full-time in 1980. Trollope began writing historical romances under the pseudonym of Caroline Harvey, the first names of her father's parents. While these were her effective apprenticeship, she came to believe: "It was the wrong genre for the time." Encouraged by her second husband, Ian Curteis, she was persuaded her to switch to contemporary fiction for which she has become known. The Choir, published in 1987, was her first contemporary novel; the Rector's Wife, published in 1991, displaced Jeffrey Archer from the top of the hardback bestseller lists. As an explanation, she said in 2006: "except for thrillers there was nothing in the middle ground of the traditional novel, where I think I am." In 1992, only Jilly Cooper's Polo and Archer's As the Crow Flies were stronger paperback bestsellers.

"I think my books are just the dear old traditional novel making a quiet comeback", she told Geraldine Bedell in a 1993 interview for The Independent on Sunday. Described as Aga sagas, for their rural themes, only two of Trollope's novels feature an Aga; the term's entry in The Oxford Companion to English Literature states that "by no means all her work fits the comforting implications of the label". Rejecting the label as not being accurate, Trollope told Lisa Allardice, writing for The Guardian in 2006: "Actually, the novels are quite subversive, quite bleak. It's all rather patronising isn't it?" Allardice disputed the "cosy reputation" Trollope's books had acquired as her novels had "tackled thorny issues including lesbianism, broken families and adoption, the mood growing darker with each novel." Terence Blacker, who coined the term for Trollope's fiction in Publishing News in 1992, admitted a decade that he "felt guilty" for lumbering Trollope with the phrase. Trollope told Bedell in 1993 that her fiction does "the things the traditional novel has always done" by mirroring reality and exploring "people's emotional lives".

Bedell observed that her novels until were: "never suburban, the real condition of most of England. Trollopian action takes place in large village houses, at vast kitchen tables; the books are as economically prestigious, quite as aspirational in their own way, as the glitter blockbusters of the Eighties." In 2009, she donated the short story The Piano Man to Oxfam's'Ox-Tales' project, four collections of UK stories written by 38 authors. Trollope's story was published in the'Water' collection, she has written the first novel in Harper Collins updating of the Jane Austen canon, The Austen Project. Her version of "Sense and Sensibility" was published in October 2013 with limited success. An adaptation of The Rector's Wife, produced for Channel 4, starred Lindsay Duncan and Ronald Pickup; the Choir, adapted by Ian Curteis, was a five-episode BBC television miniseries in 1995. It starred James Fox. Of her other novels, A Village Affair and Other People's Children have been adapted for television. A Spanish Lover: In The New York Times Betsy Groban wrote, ″Her story is filled with lively and always affectionate insights into the abiding issues of marriage and materialism, not to mention the destructive power of envy and the importance of living one's own life.

″Marrying the Mistress: ″With its sharp eye, light tone and sly, witty pace, Joanna Trollope's ninth novel delivers all the ingredients of romantic comedy, yet ends with a subtle, dark twist.″Friday Nights: Heather Thompson of The Guardian called Friday Nights "a light but insightful look at a rather conventional cast of characters."Charlie Lee-Potter, in an article for The Independent, wrote that Brother & Sister: wades through the anguish of adoption, scooping up the pain of the adopted child, the agony of the birth mother and the insecurity of the adoptive parent along the way. If I was any one of the characters imprisoned in the murky jelly of this novel, I'd be straight on to the Adoption Agency, demanding to be re-settled with another creator. Joanna Trollope has a subject capabl

Milton K. Ozaki

Milton K. Ozaki was a Japanese American writer. Ozaki was born in Wisconsin to a Japanese father and an American mother, Augusta Rathbun, he lost a leg as a young child. In addition to his work as a writer and journalist, he operated a beauty parlor. Ozaki and his wife Dolores B. Ozaki lived at 6314 Fifth Avenue in Wisconsin. In the 1970s, he operated phony mail-order colleges, including the Colorado State Christian College and Hamilton State University, he was involved in a company marketing a device fraudulently claimed to increase gas mileage, he died in Nevada. Ozaki was the author of two dozen popular mid-20th century detective novels under both his given name and the pseudonym Robert O. Saber, was one of the first American mystery writers of Japanese descent, his novels are set in the fictional, mid-sized southeastern-Wisconsin city of Stillwell, a disguised Kenosha. The Cuckoo Clock - Also published under the title "Too Many Women" A Fiend in Need The Ram of Aries The Black Dark Murders - Also published under the title "Out Of The Dark" The Affair of the Frigid Blonde - Also published under the title "The Deadly Blonde" The Deadly Lover The Scented Flesh The Dummy Murder Case The Dove - Also published under the title "Chicago Woman" No Way Out - Also published under the title "Borrowed Time" Murder Doll The Deadly Pickup Murder Honeymoon City of Sin Dressed to Kill Too Young to Die Shake Hands With The Devil Maid For Murder A Dame Called Murder Marked For Murder Model for Murder Sucker Bait Never Say Die A Time For Murder Case of the Deadly Kiss The Case of the Cop's Wife Wake Up and Scream Inquest Too Cute To Kill Milton K. Ozaki designed a dice game, Murder Dice, similar to Yahtzee and was based on the events in a murder trial

Lukáš Haraslín

Lukáš Haraslín is a Slovak football who plays in Italy for Sassuolo, on loan from Lechia Gdańsk, the Slovak national team as a right-winger. For two seasons Haraslín was a player of Parma's Primavera team. Over the two seasons he collected 29 league caps for the temam and scored 11 goals, playing most of the matches as a winger, he marked his debut in Primavera against Juventus on 2 November 2013. He came on as a substitute for Marco Boscolo Zemelo in the 54th minute. Parma lost the game 2–3. Just a week Haraslín was a part of the starting line-up for a 1–0 victory over Bologna, his season was however cut short by an injury, that stopped him from playing between January and March, leading to only 9 starts during the season. Still, by the end of the season, Haraslín managed to score his first two goals against Modena in a 5–0 win, on 12 April 2014. In the subsequent season, Haraslín played over twice as many games, scoring 9 goals between November and January, when he scored in 5 of 7 games he started, tallying a total of 7 goals.

This won him promotion for the senior team as he made an Italian senior side and Serie A debut on 1 February 2015 against Milan. Haraslín replaced Silvestre Varela in the 77th minute of the 1–3 loss at San Siro. In May Haraslín returned to the senior team, as he substituted Abdelkader Ghezzal, in a match against Fiorentina. On 7 July 2015, Haraslín joined Lechia Gdańsk on a 3-year deal, although an apparent interest was reported from numerous clubs, yet some only requested Haraslín on a loan. Haraslín debuted for Lechia on 16 August 2015 a wild 3–3 tie against Wisła Kraków. Although he was only fielded in the second half, coming on as a substitute for Bruno Nazário, he scored just after 6 minutes on the pitch, setting the score to 2–2; the following week, Haraslín scored 2 in a 3–1 win over Górnik Łęczna. In late October Haraslín suffered an injury. After he returned, he played in all of the games, although as a substitute, he completed the season with 3 goals in 20 games. His play time increased in 2016–17 season.

While he did not surpass the 3 goals from previous season, he played in 26 games. Between July and mid-August, in the first 5 rounds of Ekstraklasa, Haraslín was sidelined due to a facial injury; until March 2017, he played as a substitute, but affirmed a place in the starting line-up in the last ten matches of the season. At the beginning of the 2017–18 season it was announced the Haraslín had extended his contract with Lechia; the new deal was a two-year one, set to expire in June 2020. During the season, Haraslín only made 11 appearances as cruciate ligament rupture suffered in late-July 2017, had kept him off the pitch until late-March 2018. Since turning professional, this was Haraslín's first season. After his worst season in Lechia, so far, Haraslín came back for the 2018–19 in the best form yet. From the start of the season he had a solid place in the starting-XI. On 25 August 2018, in an away victory over Pogoń Szczecin, in the 49th minute of the game Haraslín scored his first competitive goal for Lechia after more than a 15 months, setting the score to 1–1.

Steven Vitória and Adam Chrzanowski contributed to the 3–2 win. During this season, one of Lechia's most successful in recent history, Haraslín scored 4 league goals and recorded at least 8 assists. After 32 rounds, after Ekstraklasa had split into two groups - Championship and Relegation, Lechia remained on the first place of the league table, while tied on points with Legia Warsaw. However, on matchday 33, on 27 April 2019, Lechia lost a home game at Stadion Energa Gdańsk again Legia 1–3 despite Haraslín's opening header goal in the 17th minute, after a cross from Konrad Michalak; the loss saw Lechia drop with only 4 matches of the season remaining. Lechia completed the season with a 3rd place, as they were overcome by champions Piast Gliwice; the 3rd place tied Lechia's previous best performance from the 1956 season. During the season, in addition to 4 league goals, Haraslín scored his first Polish Cup goal in a second round 3–1 victory over Resovia Rzeszów, after a pass from Jarosław Kubicki.

Unlike in the league, Lechia managed to triumph in this competition, beating Jagiellonia Białystok 1–0 in the final. Haraslín played the entire match at Warsaw's Stadion Narodowy. While this was Haraslín's first trophy in Poland, his fellow Slovak goalkeeper Dušan Kuciak won his 5th cup trophy this season; the victory made Lechia eligible for a 2nd qualifying round of the Europa League, with Gdańsk hosting the final of that edition. Additionally to this success, at the end of 2018, Haraslín was named Lechia's fan-favourite and in January 2019 it was reported that Galatasaray had notable interest in Haraslín's services, yet Inter Milan, A. S. Roma, Atalanta Bergamo and Dijon were interested; the transfer, was put on hold, as Lechia was in a battle for the championship. In an article published on 17 May 2019 Michał Gałęzewski notes, that Lechia appears to lack a replacemenet for Haraslín and while a move was expectable and comprehensible, he noted it may not happen. Rafał Sumowski from trojmiasto.pl web-portal noted that the que of future potential employers appeared to be lacking in late-May, due to an injury and not-as-good performances during the spring part of the season.

Haraslín started in Polish Cup final game against Jagiellonia Białystok playing most of the game as Lechia won the cup. Haraslín played an important role during the 2018-19 season as Lechia finished 3rd in the season, Lechia's joint highest finish in the league; the 2019–20 season saw Lechia qualify for the 2019–20 UEFA Europa League and saw them play in the P

Mary Bowermaster

Mary L. Bowermaster was a nurse's aide for schools in Butler County, until a breast cancer diagnosis in 1979. After a mastectomy and battling the disease, she began a second career in masters athletics. Bowermaster, born in Wellsville, Ohio, is the current American record holder in the W80 long jump and shot put, has pending marks that are superior to the listed record in the W80 and W85 100 metres, she holds the current W80 American Indoor records in the 60 metres, long jump and shot put. As part of her recovery from the operation, she began exercising; the following year, she competed in her first Senior Olympics. Five years she set the W65 world record in the high jump at the World Masters Athletics Championships in Melbourne, Australia. A regular competitor at various championship meets, she has set numerous other records as she has progressed through the age divisions, her story has been covered by Mike Wallace on 60 Minutes, plus 48 Hours, Charles Kuralt, ESPN and CNN. She carried the Olympic Torch for the 2002 Winter Olympics as it passed through Kentucky.

She is a member of the Ohio Women’s Hall of Fame, the Ohio Senior Citizens Hall of Fame, the Ohio Senior Olympics Hall of Fame, the Butler County Sports Hall of Fame, the USATF Masters Hall of Fame. She was the Greater Cincinnati Women Sports Association Senior Sports Woman of the Year in 1997, the USATF Masters Track and Field Athlete of the Year five times

Northwest Territories (electoral district)

Northwest Territories is a federal electoral district represented in the House of Commons of Canada. This riding was created in 1962 from Mackenzie River riding, it was composed of the entire territory of the Northwest Territories. In 1979, the riding was divided into the ridings of Western Nunatsiaq. Following the creation of the territory of Nunavut in 1999, the riding of Western Arctic was made coterminous with the new Northwest Territories. After 1999, Western Arctic was an anomaly in that, unlike Nunavut and Yukon, it did not share the name of the territory with which it was coterminous; this did not change with subsequent representation orders because the electoral boundaries revision process did not affect the territories and the territorial riding names were specified in law. In 2014, at the behest of Western Arctic MP Dennis Bevington, the riding name was changed to Northwest Territories by Bill C-37, which changed the names of several other ridings scheduled to come into effect with the representation order for the next election.

Unlike those names, the change to Northwest Territories came into effect as it involved amending the Electoral Boundaries Readjustment Act itself. From 1887 to 1905, the only areas of the NWT with representation in Parliament were those areas that became part of present-day provinces. From 1905 to 1947, the NWT was not represented in Parliament. From 1947 to 1962, the southwestern NWT was represented only by the electoral district of Yukon—Mackenzie River and Mackenzie River. In 1962, the electoral district of NWT was created to represent the entire territory, for the first time giving all Canadian territory a representative in Parliament; this riding's boundaries remained the same following the 2012 redistribution. According to the Canada 2016 CensusTwenty most common mother tongue languages: 78.3% English, 3.9% Dogrib, 2.9% French, 1.9% North Slavey, 1.8% South Slavey, 1.8% Tagalog, 1.2% Inuinnaqtun, 1.1% Dene, 0.4% German, 0.4% Vietnamese, 0.3% Gwich'in, 0.3% Arabic, 0.3% Cree, 0.3% Cantonese, 0.3% Inuktitut, 0.3% Spanish, 0.2% Ilocano, 0.2% Bengali, 0.2% Japanese, 0.2% Cebuano, 0.2% Mandarin Following the division into Western Arctic and Nunatsiaq, the riding's first MP was Progressive Conservative MP Dave Nickerson, first elected in 1979 and re-elected twice.

In the 1988 election, Nickerson was defeated by Liberal Ethel Blondin-Andrew who went on to serve as the riding's MP for eighteen years, including two years as Minister of State for Northern Development. In 2006, Blondin-Andrew was defeated by New Democrat Dennis Bevington; the earlier riding of Northwest Territories had been represented by New Democrat Wally Firth from 1972 to 1979. This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament: Riding associations are the local branches of the national political parties: List of Canadian federal electoral districts Past Canadian electoral districts Riding history for Northwest Territories from the Library of Parliament