1906 College Football All-Southern Team

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The 1906 College Football All-Southern Team consists of American football players selected to the College Football All-Southern Teams selected by various organizations for the 1906 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. For some, the SIAA champion 1906 Vanderbilt Commodores football team made up the entire team.[1] It would produce 8 of the composite 11. Owsley Manier was selected by Walter Camp third-team All-American. Vanderbilt won the SIAA championship.

Consensus eleven[edit]

The All-Southern eleven representing the consensus of newspapers as published in Fuzzy Woodruff's A History of Southern Football 1890-1928 included:

  • Bob Blake, end for Vanderbilt, unanimous selection, was a lawyer and Rhodes Scholar.[2] Blake made the drop kick to beat Carlisle, "the crowning feat of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association season."[3][4] He was selected for the Associated Press Southeast Area All-Time football team 1869-1919 era.[5]
  • Dan Blake, halfback for Vanderbilt, unanimous selection, brother of Bob. He later coached.
  • Lob Brown, end for Georgia Tech, captain-elect who helped Tech to its first defeat over Auburn.[6]
  • Walter K. Chorn, guard for Vanderbilt, was a lawyer and one time insurance superintendent of Missouri.[7]
  • Clyde R. Conner, guard for Mississippi, was a prominent lawyer of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and once United States Commissioner.[8]
  • Sam Costen, quarterback for Vanderbilt who once coached The Citadel Bulldogs. He was also an attorney.[9]
  • Honus Craig, halfback for Vanderbilt, Dan McGugin once called him the South's greatest athlete and Vanderbilt's greatest halfback.[4] One report says "When Craig was confronted with the above formidable title yesterday by a reporter whose business it is to know such things, he blushed like a girl and tried to show why Dan McGugin's judgment is not always to be trusted."[4] In Craig's opinion, Bob Blake was the South's greatest player.[4]
  • Owsley Manier, fullback for Vanderbilt, unanimous selection, a "great plunging back,"[2] selected third-team All-America by Walter Camp. Manier scored five touchdowns against Alabama in a 78-0 victory and again ran for five touchdowns over Georgia Tech (37-6) in Atlanta.[10] Manier was later an assistant coach and practicing physician.
  • Joe Pritchard, tackle for Vanderbilt, unanimous selection, coached one year at LSU and was a Presbyterian dental missionary at Luebo in the Congo.[11]
  • Lex Stone, tackle for Sewanee, coached football and basketball at the University of Tennessee. He was the school's first basketball coach.
  • Stein Stone, center for Vanderbilt, an all-time great at Vanderbilt who coached football one year at Clemson. He was an engineer.

All-Southerns of 1906[edit]

Ends[edit]

  • Bob Blake†, Vanderbilt (C, AWL, WP, MT, MCA, PW, DM)
  • Lob Brown, Georgia Tech (C, AWL, MT, PW)
  • Charlie Bagley, Washington & Lee (WP)
  • Arthur Wilson, North Carolina A&M (WP [as t])
  • Frank Shipp, Sewanee (DM)
  • Hope Sadler, Clemson (F)

Tackles[edit]

  • Joe Pritchard†, Vanderbilt (C, AWL, WP, MT, MCA, PW, DM)
  • Lex Stone, Sewanee (C, MCA [as e], PW, DM)
  • Edwin Noel, Vanderbilt (AWL, MT)

Guards[edit]

Centers[edit]

  • Stein Stone, Vanderbilt (C, AWL, WP, MCA [as t], PW, DM)
  • Grover Ketron, Georgia (MT, F)

Quarterbacks[edit]

Halfbacks[edit]

Fullbacks[edit]

Key[edit]

Bold = Consensus selection

† = Unanimous selection

C = selected by consensus of newspapers, as published in Fuzzy Woodruff's A History of Southern Football 1890-1928.[12]

AWL = selected by A. W. Lynn, sporting editor for the Atlanta Constitution.[13]

WP = selected by The Washington Post.[14]

MT = selected by the Macon Telegraph[15]

MCA = selected by former Tennessee player Nash Buckingham in the Memphis Commercial Appeal.[16][17]

PW = selected by Percy Whiting of Illustrated Outdoor News.[3]

DM = selected by Dan McGugin head coach at Vanderbilt University, with information from Bradley Walker, southern official.[3]

F = selected by Jack Forsythe for a game in Savannah on Christmas.[18]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Daniel Earle McGugin". Coach & Athlete. 28: 42. 1965 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  2. ^ a b Henry Jay Case. "Vanderbilt–A University of the New South". Outing. 64: 327 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  3. ^ a b c National Collegiate Athletic Association (1907). The Official National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Guide. pp. 27, 49 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ a b c d ""Honus" Craig, All-Southern Right Halfback---He Talks". Abilene Daily Reporter. April 25, 1909. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 8, 2015 – via University of North Texas.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ "All-Time Football Team Lists Greats Of Past, Present". Gadsden Times. July 27, 1969 – via Google news.  open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ Wiley Lee Umphlett (1992). Creating the Big Game: John W. Heisman and the Invention of American Football. p. 92. 
  7. ^ "Chorn is Head of the Missouri State". The National Underwriter. 22. March 7, 1918. p. 9 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  8. ^ Kappa Alpha Order. "Clyde R. Conner, Mississippi". The Kappa Alpha Journal. 35 (3): 381. Retrieved March 5, 2015 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  9. ^ Citadel Coaching Records Archived 2015-04-02 at the Wayback Machine.
  10. ^ Bill Traughber (September 8, 2005). "Vandy All-Americans". 
  11. ^ Vanderbilt University (1915). "Faculty-Senior Dinner, Maxwell House, April 16, 1915". Vanderbilt University Quarterly. 15: 108–112 – via Google books.  open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ Fuzzy Woodruff. A History of Southern Football l890-1928. p. 283. 
  13. ^ "Surprises The Rule During Past Season". The Atlanta Constitution. December 2, 1906. Retrieved March 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  14. ^ "Local Players Named". The Washington Post. December 7, 1906. p. 2. Retrieved March 3, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ "All Southern Football Teams". Macon Telegraph. December 2, 1906. 
  16. ^ "An All Southern Eleven Picked". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. December 23, 1906. 
  17. ^ "Some Past All-Southerns". Atlanta Georgian. December 9, 1907. p. 12. Retrieved March 5, 2015 – via Digital Library of Georgia.  open access publication – free to read
  18. ^ "Forsythe's "All Stars" Training In Charleston". Atlanta Georgian. December 22, 1906. p. 20 – via Digital Library of Georgia.  open access publication – free to read