1913 Vanderbilt Commodores football team

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1913 Vanderbilt Commodores football
1913Vandy.jpg
Conference Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association
1913 record 5–3 (3–1 SIAA)
Head coach Dan McGugin (10th season)
Offensive scheme Short punt
Captain Enoch Brown
Home stadium Dudley Field
Seasons
← 1912
1914 →
1913 SIAA football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
Auburn $ 8 0 0     8 0 0
Mississippi A&M 4 1 1     6 1 1
Georgia 3 1 0     6 2 0
Vanderbilt 2 1 0     5 3 0
Georgia Tech 5 2 0     7 2 0
Alabama 4 3 0     6 3 0
LSU 1 1 2     6 1 2
Sewanee 2 2 0     4 3 0
Florida 2 2 0     4 3 0
Clemson 2 4 0     4 4 0
Mississippi College 1 2 0     6 3 0
Tennessee 1 3 0     6 3 0
The Citadel 0 3 1     3 4 2
Mercer 0 4 1     2 5 1
Kentucky 0 1 0     6 2 0
Texas A&M 0 1 1     3 4 2
Tulane 0 4 0     3 5 0
  • $ – Conference champion

The 1913 Vanderbilt Commodores football team represented Vanderbilt University in the 1913 Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association football season. The 1913 season was Dan McGugin's 10th year as head coach. Members of the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association, the Commodores played six home games in Nashville, Tennessee and finished the season with a record of 5–3 and 2–1 in conference play.

Schedule[edit]

Date Opponent Site Result
October 4 Maryville (TN)* Dudley FieldNashville, Tennessee W 59–0  
October 11 Centre* Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee W 48–0  
October 18 Henderson-Brown* Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee W 33–0  
October 25 Michigan* Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee L 2–33  
November 1 at Virginia* Lambeth FieldCharlottesville, Virginia L 0–34  
November 8 Tennessee Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee (Rivalry) W 7–6  
November 15 at Auburn Rickwood FieldBirmingham, Alabama L 6–14  
November 28 Sewanee Dudley Field • Nashville, Tennessee (Rivalry) W 63–13  
*Non-conference game.

[1]

Season summary[edit]

Michigan[edit]

On October 25, 1913, Michigan played Vanderbilt in Nashville, Tennessee. The game matched Michigan head coach Fielding H. Yost against his former player and brother-in-law, Dan McGugin. Owing to the relationship between Yost and McGugin, the two teams played nine times between 1905 and 1923, with Michigan winning eight times. Michigan won the 1913 game, 33–2, in the worst defeat for Vanderbilt since McGugin became the head coach. The game was marked by the Wolverines' most extensive use of the forward pass during the 1913 season. Michigan's air attack was described as showing "dazzling proficiency", as the forward passes were responsible for four of Michigan's five touchdowns. In the Detroit Free Press, E. A. Batchelor wrote: "Vanderbilt fairly gasped in amazement as the Wolverines shot the ball from one to another with the precision of baseball players."[2]

Virginia[edit]

Virginia blanked the Commodores 34–0.

Tennessee[edit]

Red Rainey scored Tennessee's touchdown. Goat Carroll missed the kick.[3] Tennessee's right guard S. D. Bayer drew a 33-yard, half the distance to the goal penalty for slugging, and was ejected by umpire Bradley Walker. The first down after, Hord Boensch threw a touchdown pass to Enoch Brown. Brown ran the last ten yards shaking off several defenders.[3] Boensch kicked goal and won the game for Vanderbilt. One account reads "'Red' Rainey shone for Tennessee, though he was later relegated to the side lines after a collision with one A. Sikes, Esq., otherwise known as the "Roaring Representative from Williamson."[4]

Auburn[edit]

The Commodores lost to the SIAA champion Auburn Tigers 14–6.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "1913 Vanderbilt Commodores Schedule and Results". 
  2. ^ "Yost Warriors Give Vanderbilt Decisive Lacing; Score, 33 to 2; Brilliant Open-Field Running and Great Forward Passing Score at Will Against Southerners". Detroit Free Press. October 26, 1913. 
  3. ^ a b Bill Traughber (November 25, 2014). "1913 Rewind: Commodores rally to stay undefeated against Vols". Retrieved March 28, 2015. 
  4. ^ Vanderbilt University. "Athletics". Vanderbilt University Quarterly. 13: 309.