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Abu Dhabi

Abu Dhabi is the capital and the second-most populous city of the United Arab Emirates. It is the capital of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, the largest of the UAE's seven emirates; the city of Abu Dhabi is located off the Central West Coast. Most of the city and the Emirate reside on the mainland connected to the rest of the country; as of 2020, Abu Dhabi's urban area had an estimated population of 1.48 million, out of 2.9 million in the emirate of Abu Dhabi, as of 2016. Abu Dhabi houses local and federal government offices and is the home of the United Arab Emirates Government and the Supreme Petroleum Council; the city is home to the President of the UAE, a member of the Al Nahyan family. Abu Dhabi's rapid development and urbanization, coupled with the massive oil and gas reserves and production and high average income, have transformed it into a large, developed metropolis, it is the country's center of politics and industry, a major culture and commerce center. Abu Dhabi accounts for about two-thirds of the $400 billion UAE economy.

The area surrounding Abu Dhabi is full of archaeological evidence from historical civilizations, such as the Umm an-Nar Culture, which dates back from the third millennium BCE. Other settlements were found farther outside the modern city of Abu Dhabi, including the eastern and western regions of the Emirate. "Abu" is Arabic for father, "Dhabi" is the Arabic word for gazelle. Abu Dhabi means "Father of Gazelle." It is thought that this name came about because of the abundance of gazelles in the area and a folk tale involving Shakhbut bin Dhiyab al Nahyan. The Bani Yas bedouin was centered on the Liwa Oasis in the western region of the Emirate; this tribe was the most significant in the area, having over 20 subsections. In 1793, the Al Bu Falah subsection migrated to the island of Abu Dhabi on the coast of the Persian Gulf due to the discovery of freshwater there. One family within this section was the Nahyan family, now the ruling family of Abu Dhabi; the pearl diving business was a key industry prior to the discovery of oil reserves.

According to a source about pearling, the Persian Gulf was the best location for pearls. Pearl would have dived up to thirty times per day. There were no air tanks and any other sort of mechanical device was forbidden; the divers had a leather nose clip and leather coverings on their fingers and big toes to protect them while they searched for oysters. The divers received a portion of the season's earnings. In the 19th century, as a result of treaties entered into between Great Britain and the sheikhs of the Arab States of the Persian Gulf, Britain became the predominant influence in the area; the main purpose of British interest was to protect the trade route to India from pirates, the earlier name for the area, the "Pirate Coast". After piracy was suppressed, other considerations came into play, such as a strategic need of the British to exclude other powers from the region. Following their withdrawal from India in 1947, the British maintained their influence in Abu Dhabi as interest in the oil potential of the Persian Gulf grew.

In the mid to late 1930s, as the pearl trade declined, interest grew in the oil possibilities of the region. On 5 January 1936, Petroleum Development Trucial Coast Ltd, an associate company of the Iraq Petroleum Company, entered into a concession agreement with the ruler, Sheikh Shakhbut bin Sultan Al Nahyan, to explore for oil; this was followed by a seventy-five-year concession signed in January 1939. However, owing to the desert terrain, inland exploration was fraught with difficulties. In 1953, D'Arcy Exploration Company, the exploration arm of BP, obtained an offshore concession, transferred to a company created to operate the concession: Abu Dhabi Marine Areas was a joint venture between BP and Compagnie Française des Pétroles. In 1958, using a marine drilling platform, the ADMA Enterprise, oil was struck in the Umm Shaif field at a depth of about 2,669 metres; this was followed in 1959 by PDTC's onshore discovery well at Murban No.3. In 1962, the company discovered the Bu Hasa field and ADMA followed in 1965 with the discovery of the Zakum offshore field.

Today, in addition to the oil fields mentioned, the main producing fields onshore are Asab and Shah, offshore are al-Bunduq, Abu al-Bukhoosh. In 1904, German explorer, Hermann Burchardt, took many photographs of historical sites in Abu Dhabi, photos that are now held at the Ethnological Museum of Berlin; the city of Abu Dhabi is on the southeastern side of the Arabian Peninsula, adjoining the Persian Gulf. It is on an island less than 250 metres from the mainland and is joined to the mainland by the Maqta and Mussafah Bridges. A third, Sheikh Zayed Bridge, designed by Zaha Hadid, opened in late 2010. Abu Dhabi Island is connected to Saadiyat Island by a five-lane motorway bridge. Al-Mafraq bridge connects the city to Reem Island and was completed in early 2011; this is a multi-layer interchange bridge and it has 27 lanes which allow 25,000 automobiles to move per hour. There are three major bridges in the project, the largest has eight lanes, four leaving Abu Dhabi city and four coming in. Most of Abu Dhabi city is located on the island itself, but it has many suburban districts on the mainland, for example, Khalifa City A, B, C.

Gulf waters of Abu Dhabi holds the world'

Garnik A. Karapetyan

Garnik A. Karapetyan was an Armenian scientist and mathematician, his main research was in the fields of mathematical analysis, differential equations and mathematical physics. At the time of his death he was a professor of mathematics at Russian-Armenian University and chaired the Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modeling. Born on February 3, 1958, Gyumri. 1975–1980 – BSc, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Yerevan State University. Graduation with distinction. October, 1980 – April, 1983 – PhD, Department of Differential Equations and Functional Analysis, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, YSU. 1983 – Early defense of PhD thesis. Assistant at the Department of Numerical Analysis, Faculty of Applied Mathematics, YSU. 1987 – Obtained the academic rank of docent at the Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modeling, YSU. 1990–1994 – Deputy dean of the Faculty of Informatics and Applied Mathematics, YSU. 1992 – Acting dean of the Faculty of Informatics and Applied Mathematics, YSU.

1994–2000 – Scientific Secretary of the Faculty of Informatics and Applied Mathematics, YSU. 1997–1999 – Chairman of the Mathematics Olympiad Committee of Armenia. 2002 – May, 2018 – Head of the Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modeling, Russian-Armenian State University. January, 2007 – Doctoral thesis defense at the Specialized Council in Mathematics, YSU. 2008 – Obtained the academic rank of professor at the Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modeling, RAU. 2008 – Conferred the title of Distinguished Professor of RAU. 2008 – Obtained the recognition of diploma certifying the degree conferment of Doctor of Physico-mathematical Sciences in the Russian Federation and the academic rank of Professor of the Russian Federation. 2008 – November, 2018– Member of the Scientific Council of RAU and Dissertation Council in Mathematics of the Republic of Armenia. 2015 – May, 2018 – Deputy director of the Institute of Mathematics and High Technology, RAU. 2015 – November, 2018 – Director of the Applied Mathematics and Informatics program, RAU. 2017 – Awarded with the Medal of Anania Shirakatsi.

May, 2018 - November, 2018 - Director of the Institute of Mathematics and Informatics, RAU. Main scientific papers are dedicated to differential equations and hypoelliptic equations, the study of the properties of functions in different multianisotropic spaces, integral representations and embedding theorems for functions in multianisotropic spaces. Ghazaryan H. G, Hovhannisyan A. H, Harutyunyan T. N, Karapetyan G. A. Ordinary Differential Equations. Yerevan։ "Zangak-97", 2002. 320 pages. Ghazaryan H. G, Hovhannisyan A. H, Mamikonyan F. H. Karapetyan G. A. Ordinary Differential Equations. Yerevan։ "Zangak-97", 1988. 184 pages. Karapetyan G. A. Yeghiazaryan V. S. 300 RAU Entrance Exam Tests in Mathematics. Yerevan։ RAU Publishing House, 2006. 304 pages. Karapetyan G. A. Aghekyan G. V. Harutyunyan K. V. Hayrapetyan S. R. Algebra. Yerevan։ RAU Publishing House, 2007. 388 pages. Karapetyan G. A. Aghekyan G. V. Aramyan R. H, Dashtoyan L. L. Hayrapetyan S. R. RAU Entrance Exam Tests in Mathematics. Yerevan։ RAU Publishing House, 2008.

120 pages. Karapetyan G. A. Melkonyan A. A. Mikilyan M. A. Differential Equations with Problems. Yerevan։ RAU Publishing House, 2009. 235 pages. Karapetyan G. A. Margaryan V. N. Hayrapetyan S. R. Practice in Mathematical Analysis. Yerevan։ RAU Publishing House, 2010. 310 pages. Karapetyan G. A. Hayrapetyan S. R. Mathematical Analysis with Examples and Problems. Yerevan։ RAU Publishing House, 2014. 417 pages. Ghazaryan H. G. Karapetyan G. A. Convergence of Galerkin approximations to the solution of the Dirichlet problem // DAN SSSR, vol. 264, No.2, 1982, pp. 291–294. Karapetyan G. A. Existence and solution behavior of one class of hypoelliptic equations // DAN Аrm. SSR, vol. 74, No.5, 1982, pp. 202–07. Karapetyan G. A. Solution of μ -elliptic equations in the half-space // DAN Аrm. SSR, vol. 75, No.15, 1982, pp. 200–204. Karapetyan G. A. Theorems of Liouville and Phragmén–Lindelöf type for general regular equations // Izv. AN. Arm. SSR, ser. Math. 17, No.6, 1982, pp. 473–496. Hakobyan G. O. Karapetyan G. A. Estimates in Hölder spaces for solving quasi-elliptic equations // Mol.

Nauch. Rab. YSU, 2, 1982, pp. 47–59. Hakobyan G. O. Karapetyan G. A. Estimates of Schauder type for solving semi-elliptic equations with constant coefficients // Inter. Collection, ser. Math. No.2, 1984, pp. 5–13. Karapetyan G. A. Existence and uniqueness of the solution of the Dirichlet problem for hypoelliptic equations in unbounded domains // Proceedings of YSU, 151, No.2, 1982, pp. 3–12. Karapetyan G. A. On the behavior of one class of hypoelliptic equations in unbounded domains // Mol. Nauch. Rab. YSU, 2, 1982, pp. 5–13. Karapetyan G. A. Solution of semi-elliptic equations in the half-space // Tr. MIAN SSSR, vol. 170, 1984, pp. 119–138. Ghazaryan. H. G. Karapetyan G. A. On the convergence of Galerkin approximations to the solution of the Dirichlet problem // Mathematical Collection, 124, 1984, No.3, pp. 291–306. Karapetyan G. A; the Galerkin method for one general class of hypoelliptic equations // Inter. Collection, ser. Math. No.4, 1986, pp. 93–107. Karapetyan G. A. Arakelyan M. Z. Theorems of Liouville and Phragmén–Lindelöf type for semi-elliptic equations with general initial conditions // Inter.

Collection, ser. Math. No.4, 1986, pp. 81–93. Karapetyan G. A. On one class of degenerate regular equations in the half-space // Izv. AN Аrm. SSR, ser. Math. 21, 1986, No.5, pp. 472–487. Karapetyan G. A. Quasilinear boundary value problems for regular equati

Beaufortia bracteosa

Beaufortia bracteosa is a plant in the myrtle family, Myrtaceae and is endemic to the south-west of Western Australia. It is a shrub growing to a height of about 1 m with red to woody fruit. Beaufortia bracteosa is a compact shrub growing to a height of about 0.5–1.0 m and about 0.75 m in diameter. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs and are linear in shape, 2.5–4 mm long, 0.5–1.5 mm wide and glabrous. The flowers are arranged in heads on the ends of the branches and have 5 sepals, 5 petals and 5 bundles of stamens; the stamens are deep pink to red or maroon and joined for about 1.5–4 mm of their length into a "claw", hairy on one side. The 5 or 6 stamens in each claw all spread from the same point on the claw and are a further 1–4 m long. Flowering occurs throughout most of the year but in spring and early summer and is followed by fruit which are woody capsules 7–11.5 mm long and 4.5–6 mm wide. Beaufortia bracteosa was first formally described in 1904 by Ludwig Diels in Fragmenta Phytographiae Australiae occidentalis.

The specific epithet is derived from the Latin word bractea meaning "scale" and the suffix -osa meaning "having many bracts". This beaufortia grows in sandy soils, sometimes with clay, gravel or loam over laterite or granite, it occurs between Latham, the Wandoo National Park and Jilbadji Nature Reserve in the Avon Wheatbelt, Esperance Plains, Geraldton Sandplains, Jarrah Forest and Swan Coastal Plain biogeographic regions. It is an important component of kwongan vegetation. Beaufortia bracteosa is classified as "not threatened" by the Western Australian Government Department of Parks and Wildlife