Alfa Romeo G1

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Alfa Romeo G1
Alfa romeo g1 limousine.jpg
Overview
ManufacturerAlfa Romeo
Production1921-1923
AssemblyPortello, Milan, Italy
DesignerGiuseppe Merosi
Body and chassis
ClassLuxury car
Body styleSpider Corsa
Torpedo
Limousine
LayoutFR layout
Powertrain
Engine6,330 cc I6 sidevalve 70 bhp
Transmission4-speed manual with reverse gear
Dimensions
Wheelbase3,400 mm (130 in)
Length4,494 mm (176.9 in)
Curb weight1500 kg (3306 lbs)
Chronology
PredecessorA.L.F.A 40/60 HP
SuccessorAlfa Romeo RL

The Alfa Romeo G1 was the first all-new design from Alfa Romeo after the end of the A.L.F.A. brand. Giuseppe Merosi, while engaged in a legal dispute with Nicola Romeo regarding the brand takeover conditions, designed the update for the prewar 24HP into the revised 20/30ES and the new luxury G1;[1] the chassis was lengthened and stiffened from the 1914 40-60 HP model, entering into market territory competition with Rolls-Royce. A new 6.3 L (384 cu in) straight-6 engine was introduced, producing 70 bhp (52 kW) and 216 lb⋅ft (293 N⋅m) of torque.[2] The G1 achieved a maximum speed of 86 miles per hour (138 km/h), winning its production class at the Coppa del Garda race.[2] Total production was only 52 copies; it found virtually no customers in Italy and all 50 (bar 2 prototypes) found their way to Australia. Only one known survivor exists; is owned by New Zealand's Alfa importer and is the oldest surviving Alfa Romeo-branded car.[3][4]

The Alfa Romeo G2, a planned improved version, was never produced after the commercial failure of the G1.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "P. Italiano: 'Story of the Alfa Romeo factory and plants : part 1 the early Portello'". AISA. Archived from the original on 2007-11-11. Retrieved 2008-04-14.
  2. ^ a b "1921 Alfa Romeo G1". conceptcarz.com. Retrieved 2008-03-25.
  3. ^ "Press Release: Alfa Romeo". scoop.co.nz. Retrieved 2007-07-03.
  4. ^ "Oldest Alfa moves from farm to fame". drive.com.au. 2005. Archived from the original on 2012-03-25. Retrieved 2010-08-29.

External links[edit]