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Anti-nuclear movement

The anti-nuclear movement is a social movement that opposes various nuclear technologies. Some direct action groups, environmental movements, professional organisations have identified themselves with the movement at the local, national, or international level. Major anti-nuclear groups include Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, 350.org, Green New Deal Movement Sierra Club, Friends of the Earth, Climate Reality Project, International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, Peace Action and the Nuclear Information and Resource Service. The initial objective of the movement was nuclear disarmament, though since the late 1960s opposition has included the use of nuclear power. Many anti-nuclear groups oppose nuclear weapons; the formation of green parties in the 1970s and 1980s was a direct result of anti-nuclear politics. Scientists and diplomats have debated nuclear weapons policy since before the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945; the public became concerned about nuclear weapons testing from about 1954, following extensive nuclear testing in the Pacific.

In 1963, many countries ratified the Partial Test Ban Treaty which prohibited atmospheric nuclear testing. Some local opposition to nuclear power emerged in the early 1960s, in the late 1960s some members of the scientific community began to express their concerns. In the early 1970s, there were large protests about a proposed nuclear power plant in Wyhl, West Germany; the project was cancelled in 1975 and anti-nuclear success at Wyhl inspired opposition to nuclear power in other parts of Europe and North America. Nuclear power became an issue of major public protest in the 1970s and while opposition to nuclear power continues, increasing public support for nuclear power has re-emerged over the last decade in light of growing awareness of global warming and renewed interest in all types of clean energy. A protest against nuclear power occurred in July 1977 in Bilbao, with up to 200,000 people in attendance. Following the Three Mile Island accident in 1979, an anti-nuclear protest was held in New York City, involving 200,000 people.

In 1981, Germany's largest anti-nuclear power demonstration took place to protest against the Brokdorf Nuclear Power Plant west of Hamburg. The largest protest was held on 12 June 1982, when one million people demonstrated in New York City against nuclear weapons. A 1983 nuclear weapons protest in West Berlin had about 600,000 participants. In May 1986, following the Chernobyl disaster, an estimated 150,000 to 200,000 people marched in Rome to protest against the Italian nuclear program. In the US, public opposition preceded the shutdown of the Shoreham, Yankee Rowe, Millstone 1, Rancho Seco, Maine Yankee, many other nuclear power plants. For many years after the 1986 Chernobyl disaster nuclear power was off the policy agenda in most countries, the anti-nuclear power movement seemed to have won its case; some anti-nuclear groups disbanded. In the 2000s, following public relations activities by the nuclear industry, advances in nuclear reactor designs, concerns about climate change, nuclear power issues came back into energy policy discussions in some countries.

The 2011 Japanese nuclear accidents subsequently undermined the nuclear power industry's proposed renaissance and revived nuclear opposition worldwide, putting governments on the defensive. As of 2016, countries such as Australia, Denmark, Malaysia, New Zealand, Norway have no nuclear power stations and remain opposed to nuclear power. Germany, Italy and Switzerland are phasing-out nuclear power. Sweden had a nuclear phase-out policy, aiming to end nuclear power generation in Sweden by 2010. On 5 February 2009, the Government of Sweden announced an agreement allowing for the replacement of existing reactors ending the phase-out policy. Globally, more nuclear power reactors have closed; the application of nuclear technology, as a source of energy and as an instrument of war, has been controversial. These issues are discussed in nuclear weapons debate, nuclear power debate, uranium mining debate. Scientists and diplomats have debated nuclear weapons policy since before the Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945.

The public became concerned about nuclear weapons testing from about 1954, following extensive nuclear testing in the Pacific. In 1961, at the height of the Cold War, about 50,000 women brought together by Women Strike for Peace marched in 60 cities in the United States to demonstrate against nuclear weapons. In 1963, many countries ratified the Partial Test Ban Treaty which prohibited atmospheric nuclear testing; some local opposition to nuclear power emerged in the early 1960s, in the late 1960s some members of the scientific community began to express their concerns. In the early 1970s, there were large protests about a proposed nuclear power plant in Germany; the project was cancelled in 1975 and anti-nuclear success at Wyhl inspired opposition to nuclear power in other parts of Europe and North America. Nuclear power became an issue of major public protest in the 1970s. From an anti-nuclear point of view, there is a threat to modern civilization from global nuclear war by accidental or deliberate nuclear strike.

Some climate scientists estimate that a war between two countries that resulted in 100 Hiroshima-size atomic explosions would cause significant loss of life, in the tens of millions from climatic effects alone and disabled future generation. Soot thrown up into the atmosphere could blanket the earth, causing food chain disruption in what is termed a nuclear winter. Many anti-nuc

Never Ever Do This at Home

Never Ever Do This at Home is a comedy-reality TV show that airs on Discovery Channel. Based on Ikke gjør dette hjemme, the show features hosts Teddy Wilson and Norm Sousa, who ignore the warning labels on a variety of household items, with varying results; the show made its debut on May 2013 with two back-to-back episodes. The show has been bought by Spike TV to air in the United States. Reruns air on MTV in Canada. Teddy Wilson is best known as the host of InnerSPACE, a science-fiction news show airing on Space, he began his career in the entertainment industry as a child actor in You Can't Do That on Television. He went on to earn an Honours B. A. in political science and worked as a political advisor in the Ontario legislature. He left politics to work at MTV in 2005, in 2008 was recruited by Space to host InnerSPACE, his first assignment was interviewing George Lucas. Norm Sousa is a comedian and actor from Toronto living in New York City, he started his entertainment career at Humber College Comedy: Writing and Performance where, after graduation, he founded a comedy troupe called punchDRYSDALE which performed multiple times at the Toronto Sketch Comedy Festival.

He joined the comedy ensemble The Sketchersons, where he became the head writer and producer of Sunday Night Live. On September 12, 2012, following the success of Ikke gjør dette hjemme in Norway, Discovery Channel Canada secured the rights to produce the first English-language version of the show from Norwegian broadcaster NRK through independent distributor DRG. Insight TV was commissioned to produce 13 30-minute episodes for the first season. Similar shows are planned for the Danish and Swedish TV markets. Filming began on an old farm house in southwestern Ontario where the hosts set up shop along with a crew of safety professionals, including firefighters. 20 cameras were installed in the farmhouse to capture every angle, including Phantom high-speed cameras that can capture 2,650 frames per second. The show focuses on the chemistry behind the disasters caused by the hosts' experiments. Season 2 was filmed in Ontario area. Before the show's first episode aired, Bill Harris, of Canoe.ca, said the show appeals to "the defiant kid within all of us" and said the show works best when it focuses on potential disasters viewers might have wondered about, said he didn't relate to experiments such as the walk-in microwave oven, since that's not what a normal person might think of.

14 episodes aired in the first season, including a retrospective and behind-the-scenes special at the end of the season. Here are the highlights of the episodes. Season 2 of Never Ever Do This At Home aired on May 12, 2014. Ikke gjør dette hjemme House Hazards - A similar Canadian show

Assembly of Deputies of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug

The Assembly of Deputies of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug is the supreme representative and legislative body of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug. It consists of 19 deputies. Receives district Charter and amendments Carries out legislative regulation of subjects of conducting the district and the joint jurisdiction of the Russian Federation and the Russian Federation within the district office Hears annual reports of the head of the district administration about its activities and the activities of the district administration Exercise other powers established by the Constitution, federal laws, the Charter and laws of the Nenets Autonomous Okrug; the main form of work of the Assembly of Deputies is the session. The session is eligible if at least two thirds of the established number of members of parliament take part in its work. Deputies are required to take part in the work of each session. If it is impossible to take part in the meeting for a good reason, the MP shall inform in advance and in writing the Chairman of the Assembly indicating the reasons of the absence.

The absence of an MP without solid motivation, unauthorized interruption of his participation at the session work is considered as a violation of the rules of parliamentary ethics and entails the use of influence measures on him