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Bessemer, Alabama

Bessemer is a city southwest of Birmingham in Jefferson County, United States. The population was 27,456 at the 2010 Census, it is within the Birmingham-Hoover, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area, of which Jefferson County is the center. It developed as an industrial city in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 2019 it was named Alabama's "Worst City; the town was founded in the postbellum era by the Bessemer Land and Improvement Company, named after Henry Bessemer and owned by coal magnate Henry F. DeBardeleben, he had inherited Daniel Pratt's investments. The mayor and councilmen voted to incorporate the city of Bessemer on September 9, 1887. Located 16 miles southwest of Birmingham, Bessemer grew and its promoters believed that it might overtake the other city in economic power. Given the iron ore and limestone deposits in the area, the city became a center of steelmaking from about 1890 through the 20th century, it attracted rural migrants from across the South, as well as European immigrants.

By the 1950s, the city was majority African American in population. The industry went through considerable restructuring in the late 20th century, jobs moved out of the area. Steel is no longer made there. Bessemer is located 18 miles southwest of Birmingham. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 40.8 square miles, of which 40.7 square miles is land and 0.1 square miles is water. Bessemer is situated in the midst of the iron ore and limestone district of Alabama, in the southern part of Jones Valley. Iron ore was mined on the hills on the city's southeast side, coal was mined to the north and west, limestone deposits were nearby. All three ingredients were necessary for steelmaking, which led to the area becoming a major steel center from about 1890 through the twentieth century. Steel is no longer made within the city limits, but is still manufactured in the neighboring city of Fairfield; the climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and mild to cool winters.

According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Bessemer has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps. As of the 2013 American Community Survey, there were 27,336 people living in the city. 72.0% were African American, 24.0% White, 0.1% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% from some other race and 0.4% from two or more races. 3.2 % were Latino of any race. As of the census of 2000, there were 29,672 people, 11,537 households, 7,868 families living in the city; the population density was 729.0 people per square mile. There were 12,790 housing units at an average density of 314.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 69.55% Black or African American, 28.93% White, 0.28% Native American, 0.18% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.30% from other races, 0.74% from two or more races. 1.14% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 11,537 households out of which 30.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 34.6% were married couples living together, 29.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.8% were non-families.

29.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.0% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.12. In the city, the population was spread out with 26.8% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 21.1% from 45 to 64, 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 82.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 75.8 males. The median income for a household in the city was $23,066, the median income for a family was $28,230. Males had a median income of $29,413 versus $21,552 for females; the per capita income for the city was $12,232. About 24.2% of families and 27.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.8% of those under age 18 and 24.7% of those age 65 or over. In 1900, Bessemer ranked eighth in population in the state, second in amount of capital invested in manufacturing, fourth in the value of its manufactured product for the year.

By 1911, ore mining, iron smelting, the manufacture of iron and coke were the chief industries of Bessemer. Truck farming was an important industry, dating from the area's agricultural past. Both blacks and whites from rural areas were attracted to the city for its new work opportunities. African Americans moved into industrial jobs and became part of integrated unions. Today, ore mining has ended. Manufacturing remains a factor, with the U. S. Pipe and Foundry ductile pipe plant on the city's north side. On May 9, 2007, U. S. Pipe announced; the site was selected, among other reasons, for having available space for potential future expansions. U. S. Pipe is the largest domestic producer of Ductile Iron pipe in sizes 4 inch through 64 inch; the city was once home to a large railroad car manufacturing factory, operated by Pullman Standard for many decades and by Trinity Industries. With railroad restructuring in the late 20th century and other manufacturing moving offshore, this plant ceased most production in the 1990s.

Other industries have relocated to this facility. The decline of mining and exodus of the steelmaking and railcar manufacturing industries resulted in extensive loss of jobs; the city has lost population since a peak in 1970. It faced an economic crisis in the early to mid-1980s, as unemployed workers

Olek Czy┼╝

Aleksander "Olek" Czyż is a Polish professional basketball player. He has represented the Polish national team. Czyż grew up playing basketball in Poland, he first started playing. At the age of 14, he moved with his mother and sister to the United States and attended Reno High School, in Reno, Nevada where he was a two-time state champion, he received scholarship offers to attend colleges around the country going into his senior year at Reno High School. Throughout his collegiate freshman, half of his sophomore basketball season, Olek played for Duke University in North Carolina, he transferred to the University of Nevada, Reno, in Reno where he played during the 2010–11 and 2011–12 seasons. During his junior year, he was selected for the WAC All-Newcomer team. During his senior year, he was selected for the first-team All-WAC and led the Wolf Pack to a conference championship. Czyż graduated from Nevada with a bachelor's degree in speech communications in May 2012. After going undrafted in the 2012 NBA draft, Czyż joined the Chicago Bulls for the 2012 NBA Summer League.

On 12 August 2012, he signed with Virtus Roma of Italy for the 2012–13 season. In July 2013, Czyż joined the Portland Trail Blazers for the 2013 NBA Summer League. On 30 September 2013, he signed with the Milwaukee Bucks. However, he was waived by the Bucks on 26 October 2013. In November 2013, he was acquired by the Fort Wayne Mad Ants as an affiliate player. On 2 January 2014, he was traded to the Canton Charge. On 25 June 2014, Czyż signed with Enel Brindisi of Italy for the 2014–15 season. In July 2014, he joined the NBA D-League Select Team for the 2014 NBA Summer League. Upon his arrival at Brindisi, he failed his physicals and was subsequently released on 25 August 2014. On 7 January 2015, Czyż signed with PGE Turów Zgorzelec of Poland for the rest of the 2014–15 season. After the regular season, he was named the PLK Rookie of the Year. IndividualPLK Rookie of the Year: 2014–15 Italian League profile Nevada Wolf Pack bio Duke Blue Devils bio Official website

Johnny Rawls

Johnny Rawls is an American soul blues singer, arranger and record producer. He was influenced by the deep soul music of the 1960s, as performed by O. V. Wright, James Carr, Z. Z. Hill, although his styling and lyrics are more contemporary in nature. To date, Rawls has released more than fifteen albums under his name, he has been nominated many times for a Blues Music Award, at the 40th Blues Music Awards ceremony, Rawls' album, I'm Still Around, was named as the'Soul Blues Album of the Year'. Rawls was born in Hattiesburg, United States, he was taught the rudiments of guitar playing by his blind grandfather, played the saxophone and clarinet in high school in Purvis, Mississippi. Having mastered guitar playing by his mid teens, Rawls' schoolteacher arranged for him to back musicians who were touring through Mississippi, such as Z. Z. Hill and Joe Tex. In the mid 1970s, Rawls joined O. V. Wright's backing band, became his music director and played together with Wright until the latter's death in 1980.

The band continued billed as the Ace of Spades Band for another 13 years, toured and performed with other musicians over this time span. These included B. B. King, Little Milton, Bobby Bland, Little Johnny Taylor, Blues Boy Willie; the band included the guitarist L. C. Luckett, he and Rawls jointly released the 1994 album, Can't Sleep At Night, on Rooster Blues, his debut solo album, Here We Go, was released on JSP in 1996. The Allmusic journalist, Thom Owens, noted, "Rawls has a powerful, soulful voice which can make mediocre material sound convincing." Rawls worked as an arranger and record producer for JSP. Further JSP releases included Louisiana Woman, My Turn to Win, Put Your Trust in Me, although by the time the latter was issued, Rawls had set up his own label, Deep South Soul. Rawls appeared on the cover of the Living Blues magazine in April 2002, where he was described as "a soul-blues renaissance man"; the 2005 release No Boundaries, on Catfood Records increased his profile. His 2006 album Heart & Soul, was nominated for a Blues Music Award for'Best Soul Blues Album of the Year'.

In the same year, the West Coast Blues Hall of Fame named him'Best Vocalist'. Rawls has performed several times at the Chicago Blues Festival and at music festivals each year in the US and Canada, he has toured Europe on many occasions as well as in Australia. Red Cadillac, Ace of Spades and Memphis Still Got Soul all won the Critics Choice Award for Best Album of the Year in Living Blues, he has been honored, along with Little Milton and Tyrone Davis, with a Blues Trail Marker in Hattiesburg. The title song of Rawls 2009 album, Ace of Spades, was a tribute to his one time mentor, O. V. Wright; the album garnered Rawls with his first Blues Music Award for'Best Soul Blues Album of the Year'. Rawls album Memphis Still Got Soul, was released in April 2011, his fourth album for Catfood Records, it was nominated for 2012 Blues Music Award for Soul Album of the Year, the title song for Song of the Year and Rawls for Male Soul Artist of the Year, his third nomination in that category. With a further reference to Wright, the album's track listing included Rawls cover of the song "Blind and Crazy", associated with Wright.

His 2012 release, Soul Survivor, included another Wright song, "Eight Men Four Women". It was nominated for Soul Blues Album of the Year and Rawls was again nominated for Male Soul Artist of the Year at the 2013 Blues Music Awards, his 2013 release on Catfood Records, Remembering O. V. A tribute to O. V. Wright, featured Otis Clay as a special guest. Remembering O. V. was nominated for 2014 Soul Album of the Year and Rawls for Male Soul Artist of the Year, his 11th and 12th Blues Music Awards nominations. At the 40th Blues Music Awards ceremony in 2019, Rawls' album, I'm Still Around, was named as the'Soul Blues Album of the Year', he is a prolific songwriter with over 100 of his songs recorded. Rawls undertook co-production duties on all of his albums issued on Catfood Records, as well as on Barbara Carr's Keep The Fire Burning. List of soul-blues musicians Official website A January 2014 interview with Johnny Rawls at Soul Express

Kundur Island

Kundur Island is an island within the Riau Archipelago, part of the Riau Islands Province of Indonesia. It lies at about 80 kilometres southwest of Singapore, 76 kilometres southwest of Batam, 32 kilometres south of Great Karimun, 172 kilometres northwest of Lingga Islands and 120 kilometres west of Tanjung Pinang, it has an area of about 304 square kilometres, not including district Buru. According to the 2010 Census population, the population of Kundur Island is 67,090; as Kundur does not have an airport, all visitors arrive by ferry. Most connections are with neighbouring islands, e.g. Tanjung Balai on Karimun, mainland Sumatra. Direct ferry services to Singapore have been terminated because of decreasing profits, so travellers need to detour via Batam or Bintan; the biggest town on Kundur Island, Tanjung Batu is marked as the district city of the island. It is located at the southern tip of the island, is the hub for most ferry businesses, it is the town with most number of businesses and trading companies.

It is a popular starting/finishing point for cycling trips as well. Its commercial street is Jalan Merdeka, just a stone's throw away from the port, but most of the shops are lined on the side of Jalan Kartini and Jalan Jendral Sudirman. Jalan Usman Harun is a temple street where it locates the Vihara Dharma Shanti, a Buddhist temple. North to the end of Jalan J. Sudirman is a housing area called Batu Dua. Vehicles used in this towns include ojeks. A town on the sub-district of North Kundur, it is just a bit smaller than Tanjung Batu, another popular starting/finishing point for cycling trips. A town on the northern tip of Kundur Island, it means "straits of youth" in Bahasa Indonesia A village on the south-east zone of Kundur Island. A town located in the sub-district of West Kundur, it is the town where the biggest hotel in Hotel Taman Gembira, stands on. Kundur travel guide from Wikivoyage

Chortitz Heritage Church

The Chortitz Heritage Church is a former Mennonite church building located in the Canadian postal district of Randolph, Manitoba. The building was home to the Randolph Chortitzer Mennonite Church, one of the first Mennonite congregations in western Canada. Established in 1876 by Mennonite immigrants arriving from the Bergthal Colony in Russia, the original building was destroyed by fire and replaced by a new building in 1897, which still stands today; as the Bergthal Mennonites spread out throughout the region and built more churches, they became known as the Die Mennonitische Gemeinde zu Chortitz, known today as the Christian Mennonite Conference. The Randolph church remained as the central church for many years, as it was the home church of the bishops, it was the last of the conference's churches to still use the German language and not use musical instruments for singing. The aging congregation's dwindling numbers forced the closure of the Sunday School in the 1990s; the conference closed the church in 2010.

After its closure, the Rural Municipality of Hanover assumed ownership of the building and designated it as a municipal heritage site. The adjacent cemetery is still owned and maintained by the CMC. Christian Mennonite Conference CMC Official Website Manitoba Heritage Society

Bayshore, North Carolina

Bayshore is a census-designated place in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 3,393 at the 2010 census, it is part of the Wilmington Metropolitan Statistical Area. Bayshore is located at 34°17′1″N 77°47′47″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 3.7 square miles.3.6 square miles of it is land and 0.1 square miles of it is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 2,512 people, 967 households, 772 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 700.4 people per square mile. There were 1,058 housing units at an average density of 295.0/sq mi. The racial makeup of the CDP was 96.54% White, 1.91% African American, 0.32% Native American, 0.56% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, 0.44% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.04% of the population. There were 967 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.6% were married couples living together, 5.1% had a female householder with no husband present, 20.1% were non-families.

16.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 2.92. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, 8.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.3 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $63,869, the median income for a family was $71,815. Males had a median income of $49,286 versus $32,442 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $24,837. About 1.9% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 2.5% of those age 65 or over