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Carlo Lasinio

Carlo Lasinio was an Italian engraver. He worked chiefly at Florence. Lasinio started as a painter at the Accademia di Belle Arti in Venice, he placed more emphasis on printmaking after moving to Florence in 1778. He established his reputation with two large series of etchings in 1787 and 1789. Lasinio taught engraving at the Accademia in Florence, becoming a Professor in 1800. Lasinio moved to Pisa in 1807, he made considerable efforts to protect the Camposanto and its frescoes from ruin, from which it was threatened due to the destructive effects of the Napoleonic wars. In 1812 he began his influential book of etchings; this was entitled, Pitture a fresco del Campo Santo di Pisa. These large etchings were composed in the defined "outline style", popular in the early nineteenth century in reaction to the soft tonal effects of 18th century stipple engravers such as Francesco Bartolozzi; these works proved to be influential on 19th-century European art on the Pre-Raphaelites in Britain. According to William Holman Hunt, study of Lasinio's book convinced the group to reject High Renaissance art in favour of these earlier works.

Lasinio's engravings proved an important record of the frescoes, which were severely damaged by bombing in World War II. Other works depicting the old masters included his forty plates of Frescoes and Oil Paintings at Florence, large etchings which delineated the most famous Renaissance frescoes in Florence. Among his other activities Lasinio founded the Academy in Pisa, where he died. Apart from his many series of engravings and etchings, Lasinio created original images, his portrayals of eminent Italians include the great explorers, Christopher Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci. His son, Giovanni Paolo Lasinio, was an engraver. Bryan, Michael. Walter Armstrong and Robert Edmund Graves. Dictionary of Painters and Engravers and Critical. York St. #4, Covent Garden, London. P. 22. CS1 maint: location

Petrus Hofstede de Groot

Petrus Hofstede de Groot, Dutch theologian, was born at Leer in East Friesland, was educated at the Gymnasium and University of Groningen. For three years he was pastor of the Reformed Church at Ulrum, entered upon his lifelong duties as professor of theology at Groningen. With his colleagues Louis Gerlach Pareau, Johan Frederik van Oordt, Willem Muurling, he edited from 1837 to 1872 the Waarheid in Liefde. In this review and in his numerous books he vigorously upheld the orthodox faith against the Dutch "modern theology" movement. Many of his works were written in Latin, including: Disputatio, qua ep. ad Hebraeos cum Paulin. Epistolis comparatur Institutiones historiae ecclesiae Institutio theologise naturalis Encyclopaedia theologi christiani Others, in Dutch, were: The Divine Education of Humanity up to the Coming of Jesus Christ The Nature of the Gospel Ministry The "Modern Theology" of the Netherlands The Old Catholic Movement He became professor emeritus in 1872, died at Groningen on 5 December 1886.

This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed.. "Hofstede de Groot, Petrus". Encyclopædia Britannica. 13. Cambridge University Press. P. 566

LCDR A class

The LCDR A class was a class of 0-4-4T steam locomotives of the London and Dover Railway. The class was designed by William Kirtley and introduced in 1884; the A1 and A2 classes had larger driving wheels. The differences between the A1 and A2 classes were minor: in particular, the A2 class had a larger heating surface. All the A, A1 and A2 class locomotives passed to the South Eastern and Chatham Railway in 1899. Number 570 was withdrawn in 1915 but the remaining locomotives passed to the Southern Railway in 1923. All had been withdrawn by 1926. Bradley, D. L.. The Locomotives of the London Chatham and Dover Railway. RCTS. Bradley, D. L.. The Locomotive History of the London, Chatham & Dover Railway. London: RCTS. ISBN 0-901115-47-9. OCLC 59838998. Casserley, H. C.. Locomotives at the Grouping 1, Southern Railway. Ian Allan, Limited. ISBN 0-7110-0552-4

Jackson, Alabama

Jackson is a city in Clarke County, United States. The population was 5,228 at the 2010 census, it was one of three wet settlements in an otherwise-dry county. Jackson is located along the western border of Clarke County at coordinates 31.521°N 87.891°W / 31.521. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 15.8 square miles, of which 15.6 square miles is land and 0.19 square miles, or 1.21%, is water. Jackson sits across the Tombigbee River from Alabama; as of the census of 2010, there were 5,228 people, 2,112 households, 1,446 families living in the city. The population density was 334 people per square mile. There were 2,426 housing units at an average density of 153.5 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 54.9% White, 42.9% African American, 0.7% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.3% from other races, 0.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population. There were 2,112 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.6% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 31.5% were non-families.

29.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.8% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.00. In the city, the population was spread out with 25.1% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 23.6% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, 17.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.4 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males. The median income for a household in the city was $32,917, the median income for a family was $46,328. Males had a median income of $54,688 versus $29,483 for females; the per capita income for the city was $21,822. About 21.9% of families and 29.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 37.4% of those under age 18 and 18.3% of those age 65 or over. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,419 people, 2,094 households, 1,507 families living in the city; the population density was 358.7 people per square mile.

There were 2,341 housing units at an average density of 155.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 60.42% White, 38.49% African American, 0.26% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.20% from other races, 0.26% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.65% of the population. There were 2,094 households out of which 34.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.5% were married couples living together, 15.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.0% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.08. In the city, the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.4 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,806, the median income for a family was $45,516. Males had a median income of $43,558 versus $21,125 for females; the per capita income for the city was $17,346. About 15.3% of families and 21.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.9% of those under age 18 and 20.1% of those age 65 or over. Jackson is named after President Andrew Jackson. Former names for the city include Pine Republicville. During the Civil War, a Confederate fort was established on the banks of the Tombigbee River, it was positioned on Carney's Bluff just south of Jackson. The cannon, on the bluff now sits in front of City Hall. Jackson has four sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places, they are the Jackson Historic District, Clarke Mills, Doit W. McClellan Lustron House, J. P. McKee Lustron House. During World War II, a prisoner-of-war camp was built and operated holding 253 captured German soldiers on Ocre Avenue; the camp was opened April 6, 1945 and closed March 12, 1946.

Many of the prisoners were members of the Afrika Korps. The economy of Jackson is driven by the timber industry. Packaging Corporation of America has a paper mill, the largest employer located in the city. Alabama Southern Community College Jackson Academy Jackson Middle School Jackson High School Jackson Intermediate Joe M. Gillmore Elementary Walker Springs Road Baptist Academy Ann Bedsole, member of both houses of the Alabama State Legislature 1979-1995 Stew Bolen, former Major League Baseball player Antonio Chatman, NFL wide receiver I. Kimbell Hicks, three-term mayor of Melbourne, Florida Jimmy Outlaw, former Major League Baseball player Ray Prim, former Major League Baseball pitcher, raised in Jackson John "Jabo" Starks and blues drummer Travis and Bob, musical duo City of Jackson official website Jackson Area Chamber of Commerce The South Alabamian, local newspaper covering Jackson and surrounding area Coastal Gateway Regional Economic Development Alliance

Church of the Intercession at Fili

The Church of the Intercession at Fili is a Naryshkin baroque church commissioned by the boyar Lev Naryshkin in his suburban estate Fili. It is located at Novozavodskaya Street; the existing church replaced a 1619 wooden church established by Mikhail Romanov, consecrated in the name of the Intercession of the Virgin to commemorate the victory over Polish troops on that day in 1618. In 1689, Fili village was acquired by Lev Naryshkin, brother of Natalia Naryshkina and uncle of Peter I. Naryshkin's two brothers were murdered during the Moscow Uprising of 1682; the church was constructed between 1689 and 1694 in the shape of a Greek cross, with short, rounded annexes. It contains two churches: a winter Intercession Church in the basement and a summer, unheated Church of the Saviour Not Made by Hands above it. All construction records were lost in a 1712 fire, thus the exact year of completion is unknown, as well as the names of the architect and contractors. Both Natalia and Peter were donated money to the church.

The church was damaged by French troops in 1812 and more by the Bolsheviks and World War II. By 1945, it lost all domes and the upper octagonal layer, it was restored in 1955-1971 and 1971-1980 and painted pale red, although the original color scheme remains disputed. The earliest layer of paint uncovered by restoration is pale blue. Н.Мерзлютина, "Церковь Покрова в Филях", "Архитектура.Строительство.Дизайн", 2003 Church of the Intercession at Fili, "Pravoslavie. RU" in Russian William Craft Brumfield. A History of Russian Architecture ISBN 978-0-521-40333-7