César Pelli

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César Pelli
César Pelli (cropped).jpg
Pelli in 2010
Born (1926-10-12) October 12, 1926 (age 91)
San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina
Nationality ArgentineUnited States citizen
Occupation Architect
Awards Doctor of Arts, CTBUH Skyscraper Award, the Connecticut Architecture Foundation Distinguished Leadership Award, The Lynn S. Beedle Lifetime Achievement Award, The Aga Khan Award for Architecture
Practice Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects
Buildings
Design Modern architecture with material, formal, and contextual variety and no personal signature style.

César Pelli, founder of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects, is an Argentine American architect who has designed some of the world's tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks.[1] Some of his most notable contributions include the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur [2] and the World Financial Center in New York City.[3] The American Institute of Architects named him one of the ten most influential living American architects in 1991 and awarded him the AIA Gold Medal in 1995.[4][5] In 2008, the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat presented him with The Lynn S. Beedle Lifetime Achievement Award.[6]

Early life and education[edit]

Pelli was born October 12, 1926 in Tucuman, Argentina.[7] Pelli attended the Universidad Nacional de Tucumán.[8][9] In 1952, he became a student at the University of Illinois School of Architecture where he received his Master of Science in Architecture degree in 1954.[10][11]

Career[edit]

Early years[edit]

In 1952, Pelli came to the United States[12] with his then-wife, Diana Balmori[13] (deceased 2016), and became a naturalized citizen in 1964,[14] after his graduation from the University of Illinois School of Architecture, Pelli worked for Eero Saarinen in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan for ten years.[15][16] While with Eero, he worked on the TWA terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport[17] and the Morse and Stiles colleges at Yale University.[18]

In 1964, he became director of design at Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall in Los Angeles;[19] in 1965, Pelli designed the Sunset Mountain Park Urban Nucleus (an unbuilt project).[20] In 1968 Pelli became partner for design at Gruen Associates in Los Angeles;[21] in 1969, Pelli designed the COMSAT research and development laboratories in Clarksburg, Maryland.[22][23] Pelli designed the landmark first building at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood, California, which was completed 1975, the United States Embassy in Tokyo, Japan, was designed by Pelli in 1972 and completed in 1975.[24] While practicing in Los Angeles, Pelli taught in the architecture program at UCLA.[25]

1977-1989[edit]

In 1977, Pelli was selected to be the dean of the Yale School of Architecture in New Haven, Connecticut, and served in that post until 1984.[26] Shortly after Pelli arrived at Yale, he won the commission to design the expansion and renovation of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, which resulted in the establishment of his own firm, Cesar Pelli & Associates.[27][28][29] The museum’s expansion/renovation and the Museum of Modern Art Residential Tower were completed 1984; the World Financial Center in New York, which includes the grand public space of the Winter Garden, was completed in 1988.[30] Among other significant projects during this period are the Crile Clinic Building in Cleveland, Ohio, completed 1984; Herring Hall at Rice University in Houston, Texas (also completed 1984); completion in 1988 of the Green Building at the Pacific Design Center in West Hollywood, California; and the construction of the Wells Fargo Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1989.[31]

1990-2005[edit]

Pelli was named one of the ten most influential living American Architects by the American Institute of Architects in 1991. In 1995, he was awarded the American Institute of Architects Gold Medal;[32][33] in May 2004, Pelli was awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree from the University.[34] In 2005, Pelli was honored with the Connecticut Architecture Foundation’s Distinguished Leadership Award.[35]

Buildings during this period are marked by further experimentation with a variety of materials (most prominently stainless steel) and Pelli’s evolution of the skyscraper. Canary Wharf Tower in London (opened in 1991); Plaza Tower in Costa Mesa, California (completed 1991); and the NTT Headquarters in Tokyo (finished 1995) were preludes to a landmark project that Pelli designed for Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.[36] The Petronas Towers were completed in 1997, sheathed in stainless steel and reflecting Islamic design motifs,[37] the dual towers were the world's tallest buildings until 2004.[38] That year, Pelli received the Aga Khan Award for Architecture for the design of the Petronas Towers[39] Pelli’s design for the National Museum of Art in Osaka, Japan was completed 2005, the same year that Pelli’s firm changed its name to Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects to reflect the growing roles of senior principals Fred W. Clarke and Rafael Pelli.[40]

2006-current[edit]

The Cira Centre on the Schuylkill River, designed by Pelli, opened in January 2006. Pelli designed the master plan for Cira Centre South, the tallest building dedicated to student housing in the United States, the building houses students of the University of Pennsylvania and was completed in 2014. He was also architect of the 730-foot luxury mixed-use skyscraper FMC Tower as part of the Cira Centre South development.[41]

This period has seen the completion of several cultural/civic projects designed by Pelli, the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida opened in 2006, the same year that Pelli’s design for the Minneapolis Central Library completed construction, as well as the Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall and Samueli Theater in Costa Mesa, California.[42] Pelli designs for office towers and developments throughout Asia and South America have been completed in the past decade;[43] in 2012, the three-building Pacific Design Center, which Pelli designed 40 years earlier while at Gruen Associates, was completed with the addition of the Red Building.[44]

In May 2008, Pelli was given an honorary Doctor of Arts degree by Yale University,[45] that same year, he received the Lynn S. Beedle Lifetime Achievement Award from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat.[46] In 2012, Pelli was honored with the platinum Konex Award for architecture and the diamond Konex Award for visual arts.[47]

Publications[edit]

  • 1982: "Skyscrapers," Perspecta 18, pp. 134–151.
  • 1984: Introduction to The Second Generation by Esther McCoy (Peregrine Smith Books)
  • 1999: Observations for Young Architects (Monacelli Press)
  • 2001: Petronas Towers: The Architecture of High Construction co-authored with Michael J. Crosbie (Wiley-Academy)
  • 2002: Foreword to Ralph Rapson: Sketches and Drawings from Around the World by Ralph Rapson (Afton Historical Society Press)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Master of the Schuylkill – Architect César Pelli". Patriot Harbor Lines. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  2. ^ "A Conversation with Cesar Pelli". New Haven Living. July 2013. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  3. ^ "Cesar Pelli: Connections". National Building Museum. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  4. ^ "Master of the Schuylkill – Architect César Pelli". Patriot Harbor Lines. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  5. ^ Benjamin Forgey. "COMSAT Alumni & Retirees Association". COMARA.org. Retrieved 2013-04-21.
  6. ^ "2008 Lynn S. Beedle Award Winner". Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. Retrieved 17 May 2012.
  7. ^ "César Pelli: "I avoided a style"". La Gaceta. June 10, 2012. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  8. ^ Marcelo Gardinetti (June 2012). "César Pelli Tucuman". Technne. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  9. ^ Charles E. Gagit, Jr. (June 1, 2015). The Groundbreakers: Architects in American History Their Places and Times. Transaction Publishers.
  10. ^ "Cesar Pelli: Connections". National Building Museum. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  11. ^ "Cesar Pelli gives convocation address at University of Illinois". Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. May 17, 2014. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  12. ^ Charles E. Gagit, Jr. (June 1, 2015). The Groundbreakers: Architects in American History Their Places and Times. Transaction Publishers.
  13. ^ Paola Singer (May 10, 2016). "César Pelli and His Nonchalant Architecture". Surface Magazine. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  14. ^ "Master of the Schuylkill – Architect César Pelli". Patriot Harbor Lines. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  15. ^ Charles E. Gagit, Jr. (June 1, 2015). The Groundbreakers: Architects in American History Their Places and Times. Transaction Publishers.
  16. ^ Nicholas Von Hoffman (February 28, 2005). "Cesar Pelli Architecture and Design". Architectural Digest. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  17. ^ Paola Singer (May 10, 2016). "César Pelli and His Nonchalant Architecture". Surface Magazine. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  18. ^ Interview with Cesar Pelli by Michael J. Crosbie, New Haven, CT, March 8, 2016.
  19. ^ Nicholas Von Hoffman (February 28, 2005). "Cesar Pelli Architecture and Design". Architectural Digest. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  20. ^ "Cesar Pelli: Connections". National Building Museum. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  21. ^ Interview with Cesar Pelli by Michael J. Crosbie, New Haven, CT, March 8, 2016.
  22. ^ "Early Cesar Pelli Building Threatened with Demolition". Preservation Online. National Trust. June 21, 2005. Archived from the original on 2006-05-03.
  23. ^ Benjamin Forgey. "COMSAT Alumni & Retirees Association". COMARA.org. Retrieved 2013-04-21.
  24. ^ Michael J. Crosbie. “Introduction: A Conversation with Cesar Pelli.” Cesar Pelli: Selected and Current Works. Mulgrave: Images Publishing Group, 1993.
  25. ^ Interview with Cesar Pelli by Michael J. Crosbie, New Haven, CT, March 8, 2016.
  26. ^ Charles E. Gagit, Jr. (June 1, 2015). The Groundbreakers: Architects in American History Their Places and Times. Transaction Publishers.
  27. ^ Nicholas Von Hoffman (February 28, 2005). "Cesar Pelli Architecture and Design". Architectural Digest. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  28. ^ Charles E. Gagit, Jr. (June 1, 2015). The Groundbreakers: Architects in American History Their Places and Times. Transaction Publishers.
  29. ^ Paola Singer (May 10, 2016). "César Pelli and His Nonchalant Architecture". Surface Magazine. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  30. ^ "Cesar Pelli: Connections". National Building Museum. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  31. ^ Michael J. Crosbie. “Introduction: A Conversation with Cesar Pelli.” Cesar Pelli: Selected and Current Works. Mulgrave: Images Publishing Group, 1993.
  32. ^ "Master of the Schuylkill – Architect César Pelli". Patriot Harbor Lines. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  33. ^ Benjamin Forgey. "COMSAT Alumni & Retirees Association". COMARA.org. Retrieved 2013-04-21.
  34. ^ "UMD to honor Weber Music Hall architect at commencement May 13". Budgeteer News. April 30, 2004. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  35. ^ Connecticut Architecture Foundation [1]. Retrieved November 30, 2016.
  36. ^ Michael J. Crosbie. “Introduction: A Conversation with Cesar Pelli.” Cesar Pelli: Selected and Current Works. Mulgrave: Images Publishing Group, 1993.
  37. ^ Michael J. Crosbie. Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, 2013.
  38. ^ "Petronas Twin Towers". Culture Now. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  39. ^ Linda Hales (November 27, 2004). "The Spirit Behind the Aga Khan Awards". Washington Post. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  40. ^ Michael J. Crosbie. Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, 2013.
  41. ^ "Master of the Schuylkill – Architect César Pelli". Patriot Harbor Lines. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  42. ^ Michael J. Crosbie. Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, 2013.
  43. ^ Michael J. Crosbie. Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects. Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, 2013.
  44. ^ "Pacific Design Center". Los Angeles Conservancy. Retrieved September 12, 2016.
  45. ^ "University awards 3,117 degrees at Commencement". Yale Daily News. Archived from the original on 2008-07-27.
  46. ^ "2008 Lynn S. Beedle Award Winner". Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. Retrieved 17 May 2012.
  47. ^ "César Pelli's exhibition at Mendoza". Universidad De Mendoza. Retrieved September 12, 2016.

External links[edit]