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Carl Nebel

Carl Nebel was a German engineer and draughtsman, best known for his detailed paintings and lithographic prints made from them of the Mexican landscape and people during the battles of the Mexican–American War. Nebel was born at Altona, today a part of Hamburg. After studies in Hamburg and Paris, he travelled to America, where he was a resident of Mexico from 1829 until 1834. In 1836, he published in Paris his renowned illustrated work on that country—Voyage pittoresque et archéologique dans la partie la plus intéressante du Méxique, with 50 lithographs made from his paintings, twenty of which were hand-colored, an introduction by Alexander von Humboldt. In 1851, he published together with George Wilkins Kendall some of his paintings of the events of the Mexican–American War in the book The War between the United States and Mexico Illustrated; the book contained twelve color lithographs done by Adolphe Jean-Baptiste Bayot and was printed by Joseph Lemercier – a leading lithographic team of the time.

In both cases, Nebel's illustrations were enhanced by his making use of the newest printing developments in France. Aguilar Ochoa, "The Visual Adventures of an Itinerant Painter" in Artes de México. No. 80, "Carl Nebel: Nineteenth-Century Itinerant Painter", August 2006, pp. 67–70. Diener, Pablo. "Picturesque Mexico" in Artes de México. No. 80, "Carl Nebel: Nineteenth-Century Itinerant Painter", August 2006, pp. 74–77. López Luján, Leonardo. "Mesoamerican Archeology in Carl Nebel's Work" in Artes de México. No. 80, "Carl Nebel: Nineteenth-Century Itinerant Painter", August 2006, pp. 70–74. Mayer, Roberto. "Bibliographic Curiosity" in Artes de México. No. 80, "Carl Nebel: Nineteenth-Century Itinerant Painter", August 2006, p. 80. Orellana, Margarita de. "Views from Afar and from Up Close" in Artes de México. No. 80, "Carl Nebel: Nineteenth-Century Itinerant Painter", August 2006, p. 66. Tyler, Ron. "A Great American Book: The War between the United States and Mexico, Illustrated" in Artes de México. No. 80, "Carl Nebel: Nineteenth-Century Itinerant Painter", August 2006, pp. 77–80.

Media related to Carl Nebel at Wikimedia Commons

168th Field Artillery Regiment

The 168th Field Artillery Regiment is a Field Artillery Branch regiment of the Army National Guard. During World War II the unit was configured under the 75th Field Artillery Brigade with the following units- 168th Field Artillery Battalion Colorado National Guard 181st Field Artillery Battalion Tennessee National Guard 191st Field Artillery Battalion Tennessee National Guard A Colorado unit of the 148th Field Artillery was reorganized in the Colorado National Guard as the 1st Battalion, 158th Field Artillery and federally recognized 9 July 1923 with headquarters at Loveland. Reorganized and redesignated 1 July 1926 as the 168th Field Artillery Battalion. Redesignated 1 August 1933 as the 1st battalion, 168th Field Artillery. Inducted into federal Service 24 February 1941 at Denver. Reorganized and redesignated 1 March 1943 as the 168th field Artillery Battalion. During World War II the battalion was part of the 75th Field Artillery Brigade. Inactivated 17 January 1946 at Camp Stoneman, California Reorganized and federally recognized 6 January 1947 with headquarters at Denver Consolidated with the 157th Field Artillery Regiment 1 February 1959.

The current unit's lineage is as follows: 3rd Battalion, 134th Infantry, an element of the 34th Infantry Division, was organized and federally recognized 4 December 1946. Its headquarters was created at Nebraska, it was converted and redesigned 1 March 1959 as the 168th Regimental Artillery, consisting of the 1st and 2nd Howitzer Battalions, elements of the 34th Infantry Division. Reorganized 1 April 1963 to consist of the 1st Howitzer Battalion non-divisional, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, an element of the 67th Infantry Brigade. Reorganized 1 March 1964 to consist of the 1st Howitzer Battalion non-divisional, 2nd Howitzer Battalion, element of the 67th Infantry Brigade. Reorganized 1 May 1968 to consist of the 1st Battalion, an element of the 67th Infantry Brigade. Reorganized 1 October 1985 to consist of the 1st Battalion, 168th Field Artillery, an element of the 35th Division Artillery, direct support to the 67th Infantry Brigade. Deactivated 4 October 1997; the coat of arms was approved for the 168th Field Artillery Battalion on 13 November 1928.

It was amended to correct the blazon of the shield on 19 January 1929. It was redesignated for the 168th Field Artillery Regiment on 9 January 1943; the insignia was redesignated for the 168th Field Artillery Battalion on 18 August 1943. It was rescinded/cancelled on 1 September 1961; the insignia was reinstated and redesignated for the 168th Regiment on 24 April 1997. It was amended to correct the blazon of the shield on 17 November 1997. World War I Champagne-Marne Aisne-Marne St. Mihiel Meuse-Argonne Champagne 1918 World War II New Guinea Luzon Philippine Presidential Unit Citation, Streamer embroidered 17 OCTOBER 1944 to 4 JULY 1945 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Army Institute of Heraldry document "168 field artillery". CMH Field Artillery lineages http://co.ng.mil/arng/units/rti/default.aspx

RKVV DEM

R. K. V. V. DEM, an abbreviation for Rooms Katholieke Voetbalvereniging Door Eendracht Macht, is a Dutch football club from Beverwijk, its colors are a white shirt with a blue'V', blue pants, blue socks. RKVV DEM was founded on 1 October 1922 as RKVV DES, short for "Door Eendracht Sterk". After another club with the name was detected the name was changed to DEM. From 1940 to 2018, the Sunday male team hovered between the Derde Klasse, Tweede Klasse and Eerste Klasse, with a limited number of seasons in Vierde Klasse. In 2018 it reached the Hoofdklasse through playoffs; the first squad won a 2018–19 championship in the Hoofdklasse. It was led by coach Arvid Smit. In 2019–20 it plays in the Derde Divisie, just one year after it reached the Hoofdklasse for the first time