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Coon Rapids, Minnesota

Coon Rapids is a northern suburb of Minneapolis, is the largest city in Anoka County, United States. The population was 61,476 at the 2010 census, making it the thirteenth largest city in Minnesota and the seventh largest Twin Cities suburb. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 23.34 square miles, of which, 22.61 square miles is land and 0.73 square miles is water. Recreational lakes in the city include Cenaiko Lake and Crooked Lake, two-thirds of, in Coon Rapids; the other third is in the city of Andover to the north. In 1835, the Red River Ox Cart Trail was laid to establish military and trade connections between Minneapolis and Anoka; the first industries of Coon Rapids sprung up around the road, including the prominent Anoka Pressed Brick and Terra Cotta Company, founded by Dr. D. C. Dunham in 1881; the clay excavation site – known locally as the “Clay Hole” – is one of the lasting reminders of Coon Rapids’ industrial history. Today, the vital Red River Ox Cart Trail is known as Coon Rapids Boulevard and remains an important commercial corridor for the city.

In 1912, construction began on the Coon Rapids Dam and the influx of laborers and engineers increased the city’s population to over 1,000 for the first time. Completed in 1914, the dam functioned as a regional power source for the Northern States Power Company until it was sold to the Hennepin County Park Board in 1969 and incorporated into the Coon Rapids Dam Regional Park; when the dam was built, Anoka Township renamed itself Coon Creek Rapids shortened to Coon Rapids. In 1959, the Village of Coon Rapids voted to incorporate as a city and the City of Coon Rapids was born; the city's population increased from 14,000 in 1959 to more than 62,000 in 2015, making it the 13th largest city in Minnesota. While commercial traffic on the Mississippi River once passed through Coon Rapids - steamboats could reach as far north as St. Cloud under certain conditions - the construction of the Coon Rapids Dam marked the city as the northern terminus of the navigable portion of the river. U. S. Highway 10 and Minnesota State Highways 47 and 610 are three of the main routes in the city.

Coon Rapids Riverdale Station is served by the Northstar Commuter Rail line connecting the northwest suburbs and downtown Minneapolis. Coon Rapids is home to the headquarters of medical device manufacturer RMS Company, furniture retailer HOM Furniture, printers/publishers John Roberts Company and ECM Publishers. According to the City's 2014 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report, the city's largest employers are: The city of Coon Rapids has a council–manager form of government, its current mayor is Jerry Koch; as of the 2012 election, Coon Rapids is represented in the State House by districts 35B, 36A, 36B and 37A. Coon Rapids is located in Minnesota's 3rd congressional district, represented by Democrat Dean Phillips, in Minnesota's 6th congressional district, represented by Republican Tom Emmer. Since its incorporation as a city in 1952, Coon Rapids, Minnesota has had 15 mayors: The next mayoral election will take place in 2022; the city is home to Anoka-Ramsey Community College, which offers a wide variety of 2- and 4-year programs.

The college awarded 754 Associate degrees in 2013. Coon Rapids is served by the Anoka-Hennepin Public School District 11. Coon Rapids High School is the largest school in the city, with enrollment of 2800. Coon Rapids Middle School is located in the city, sharing a parking lot with the high school; the private Catholic school, Epiphany, is another school, within the city. Cross of Christ Lutheran School is a Pre-K-8 grade school of the Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod in Coon Rapids; as of the census of 2010, there were 61,476 people, 23,532 households, 16,323 families living in the city. The population density was 2,719.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 24,462 housing units at an average density of 1,081.9 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 86.0% White, 5.5% African American, 0.7% Native American, 3.5% Asian, 1.2% from other races, 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.2% of the population. There were 23,532 households of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.4% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, 30.6% were non-families.

23.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.08. The median age in the city was 36.9 years. 24.5% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 51.6 % female. As of the census of 2000, there were 61,627 people, 22,578 households, 16,572 families living in the city; the population density was 2,718.1 people per square mile. There were 22,828 housing units at an average density of 1,007.2 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 93.22% White, 2.18% African American, 0.67% Native American, 1.60% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.59% from other races, 1.73% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.51% of the population. There were 22,578 households out of which 39.1% had children un

Jeff Hughes (soccer)

Jeff Hughes is an American professional soccer player. Growing up in Northern Kentucky, Hughes set several area records for goals scored while playing at Holmes High School. During his senior season, he set the Region record for goals scored in a season and was voted 2001 Northern Kentucky Player of the Year. After high school Hughes chose to play soccer for NCAA Division I Western Michigan University, later transferred to the University of Cincinnati at the end of his sophomore year. Hughes left the college ranks after just one season with the UC Bearcats, forfeiting his remaining NCAA eligibility to play professionally, he signed with the Second Bundesliga club TSV 1860 München, but soon after, he returned to the US and found a home with the USL Second Division team Cincinnati Kings. During the 2006 season, the Kings traded Hughes to the North Carolina-based Wilmington Hammerheads. After just over a year with Wilmington, he left to join the Pittsburgh Riverhounds for the 2008 season. After the close of the 2008 season, he signed with 1790 Cincinnati in the Professional Arena Soccer League, where he was named 2nd team PASL.

He returned to the Riverhounds for 2009, but was released from his contract at the end of the season. Having been unable to secure a professional contract elsewhere, Hughes returned to play for the Cincinnati Kings in the USL Premier Development League in 2010. Jeff signed for the Major Indoor Soccer League club, the Syracuse Silver Knights in 2011. Hughes signed on to be a midfielder and the head coach of the Cincinnati Kings of the Professional Arena Soccer League for the 2012–13 season. Although he led the Kings to qualify for the postseason and was the team's leading scorer, he was released on January 25, 2013. Hughes signed with the Missouri Comets of the Major Indoor Soccer League the same day. Riverhounds bio

Belly Dancer (Kardinal Offishall song)

"Belly Dancer" is a hip-hop song by Kardinal Offishall featuring Pharrell Williams. Produced by The Neptunes, the single was released on March 25, 2003, it was the first single from his unreleased album, Firestarter Vol. 2: The F-Word Theory. The song was inspired by Naomi Campbell, in the studio while the song was recorded; the single appeared on the Billboard charts, a music video was shot by Little X on May 7, 2003 in Toronto. However, the video remains unreleased, because Kardinal's label at the time, MCA Records, was absorbed into Geffen Records, leaving the single without promotion. In an interview, Kardinal stated that he does not like the song, "it was the first thing I did that wasn't from the heart." A-side "Belly Dancer" "Belly Dancer" B-side "Belly Dancer" "Sick!" "Sick!"

John Lynn (VC)

John Lynn VC DCM was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. He was 27 years old, a private in the 2nd Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers, British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC. On 2 May 1915 near Ypres, when the Germans were advancing behind their wave of asphyxiating gas, Private Lynn, although overcome by the deadly fumes, handled his machine-gun with great effect against the enemy, when he could not see them, he moved his gun higher up the parapet so that he could fire more effectively; this checked any further advance and the outstanding courage displayed by this soldier had a great effect upon his comrades in the trying circumstances. Private Lynn died the next day from the effects of gas poisoning. Lynn was awarded the Cross of the Order of St. George, 4th Class, his Victoria Cross is displayed at the Fusilier Museum, Lancashire.

John Lynn's original grave was in Vlamertinghe Churchyard. A memorial headstone is in Grootebeek British Cemetery, bearing the inscription: WHO WAS BURIED AT THE TIME IN VLAMERTINGHE CHURCHYARD BUT WHOSE GRAVE WAS DESTROYED IN LATER BATTLES A PLACE IS VACANT IN OUR HOME THAT NEVER CAN BE FILLED. Monuments to Courage The Register of the Victoria Cross VCs of the First World War - The Western Front 1915

King Sound

King Sound is a large gulf in northern Western Australia. It expands from the mouth of the Fitzroy River, one of Australia's largest watercourses, opens to the Indian Ocean, it is about 120 km long, averages about 50 km in width. The port town of Derby lies near the mouth of the Fitzroy River on the eastern shore of King Sound. King Sound has the highest tides in Australia, amongst the highest in the world, reaching a maximum tidal range of 11.8 metres at Derby. The tidal range and water dynamic were researched in 1997–1998. Other rivers that discharge into the sound include the Lennard River, Meda River, Robinson River and May River. King Sound is bordered by the island clusters of the Buccaneer Archipelago to the East and Cape Leveque to the West; the traditional owners and original inhabitants of the area are Indigenous Australians, namely the Nimanburu and Warwa peoples. The first European to explore the Sound was William Dampier who visited the region aboard Cygnet in 1688. Philip Parker King named the area Cygnet Bay.

The area was visited by John Stokes and John Wickham aboard HMS Beagle in 1838. The Sound is named after Philip Parker King. In the 1880s it was one of the sites in the Kimberleys of a short-lived gold rush. Geoscience Australia place names16°50′S 123°25′E

List of lemmas

This following is a list of lemmas. See list of axioms, list of theorems and list of conjectures. 0/1 Sorting lemma Abel's lemma Abhyankar's lemma Archimedes's lemmas Artin–Rees lemma Aubin–Lions lemma Barbalat's lemma Basic perturbation lemma Berge's lemma Bézout's lemma Bhaskara's lemma Blichfeldt's lemma Borel's lemma Borel–Cantelli lemma Bounding lemmas, of which there are several Bramble–Hilbert lemma Brezis–Lions lemma Burnside's lemma known as the Cauchy–Frobenius lemma Céa's lemma Closed map lemma Closeness lemma Commutation lemmas, of which there are several Composition lemmas, of which there are several Cotlar–Stein lemma Couchman's lemma Counting lemmas, of which there are several Cousin's lemma Covering lemma Craig interpolation lemma Crossing lemma Danielson–Lanczos lemma Davis–Figiel–Johnson–Pelczynski factorization lemma Dehn's lemma Delta lemma Deny–Lions lemma Diagonal lemma Dickson's lemma Dobrushin's lemma Doob–Dynkin lemma Dwork's lemma Dynkin lemma Ehrling's lemma Ellis–Numakura lemma Estimation lemma Euclid's lemma Expander mixing lemma Expansion lemmas, of which there are several Factorization lemma Farkas's lemma Fatou's lemma Feinstein's fundamental lemma Fekete's lemma Feld–Tai lemma Finsler's lemma Fitting lemma Five lemma Fixed-point lemma for normal functions Fodor's lemma Forking lemma Frattini's lemma Friedrichs's lemma Frostman's lemma Fundamental lemma Fundamental lemma of calculus of variations Fundamental lemma of interpolation theory Fundamental lemma of sieve theory Gauss's lemmas Glivenko–Cantelli lemma Gödel's diagonal lemma Goursat's lemma Grönwall's inequality Grönwall's lemma Gromov's convex integration lemma Gross's integration lemma Grothendieck lemma Handshaking lemma Hardy–Littlewood lemma Harmonic series summation lemma Haruki's lemma Hartogs's lemma Hayashi's connecting lemma Hensel's lemma Higman's lemma Hindley–Rosen lemma Hopf lemma Horseshoe lemma Hotelling's lemma Hua's lemma Huet's strong confluence lemma Injective test lemma Integration lemmas, of which there are several Iteration lemmas, of which there are several Itô's lemma Johnson–Lindenstrauss lemma Jónsson's lemma Jordan's lemma Kalman–Yakubovich–Popov lemma Kelly's lemma Klop's lemma Knaster–Kuratowski–Mazurkiewicz lemma Knuth's 0-1 sorting lemma Kőnig's lemma Kronecker's lemma Krull's separation lemma Lambda lemma for hyperbolic invariant manifolds Lax–Milgram lemma Lebesgue's number lemma Leftover hash lemma Lindelöf's lemma Lindenbaum's lemma Lions's lemma Little's lemma Littlewood–Offord lemma Łojasiewicz factorization lemma Lovász local lemma Malliavin's absolute continuity lemma Margulis lemma Matrix determinant lemma Matrix inversion lemma Mautner's lemma Morse lemma Moschovakis coding lemma Mostowski collapse lemma Mother's Note lemma Nakayama lemma Newman's lemma Neyman–Pearson lemma Nine lemma Noether's normalization lemma Ogden's lemma Parallel moves lemma Parity lemmas, of which there are several Partition lemmas, of which there are several Ping-pong lemma Piling-up lemma Poincaré lemma of closed and exact differential forms Pólya–Burnside lemma Prime avoidance lemma Pugh's closing lemma Pumping lemma sometimes called the Bar-Hillel lemma Quantifier reversal lemma Racah factorization lemma Rasiowa–Sikorski lemma Recursion lemmas, of which there are several Reduction lemmas, of which there are several Ricci's lemma Riemann–Lebesgue lemma Rigidity lemma Riesz's lemma Robbins lemma Rouche–Kronecker–Campelli lemma Sard's lemma Satisfiability coding lemma Schanuel's lemma Schreier's subgroup lemma Schur's lemma (representation theo