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Counts of Blois

The County of Blois was centred on Blois, south of Paris, France. One of the chief cities, along with Blois itself, was Chartres. Blois was associated with Champagne Province, the House of Châtillon, the Dukes of Brittany and with the French royal family. Theobald I, Count of Blois served as Regent to Duke of Brittany. Bertha of Blois, the daughter of Odo II of Blois, became Duchess Consort of Brittany through her marriage to Alan II, Duke of Brittany. Stephen Henry's son Stephen of Blois became King of England. Charles de Blois, son of Guy I, Count of Blois, married Joan of Penthievre, the heiress of John III, Duke of Brittany. Upon the death of his only son, Guy II, Count of Blois sold the county to Louis I, Duke of Orléans and the county passed to the French royal family. Blois was important during the Hundred Years' War; the extent of the county varied over time. The northern portion, bordering on Normandy, was sometimes alienated as the County of Chartres, but the Counts of Blois who possessed it did not use a separate title for it.

These lands were sold to the crown by Joan, Countess of Blois in 1291. In 1439, the area around Châteaudun was separated as Dunois for Jean de Dunois, appointed Count of Dunois. Title held by House of Blois. 832–834: William, Count of Blois, Count of Châteaudun. 834–865: Odo I, Count of Blois, Count of Châteaudun, Count of Troyes 865–866: Robert, Count of Blois, Count of Troyes. Title held by House of Blois. 960–975: Theobald I, Count of Tours, Count of Chartres 975–996: Odo I, Count of Blois, Count of Tours, Count of Chartres 996–1004: Theobald II, Count of Blois, Count of Tours, Count of Chartres 1004–1037: Odo II, Count of Blois, Count of Tours, Count of Chartres. 1037–1089: Theobald III, Count of Blois, Count of Tours, Count of Chartres. 1089–1102: Stephen I & II, Count of Blois, Count of Chartres. 1102–1152: Theobald IV & II, Count of Blois, Count of Chartres. 1152–1191: Theobald V, Count of Blois, Count of Chartres 1191–1205: Louis I, Count of Blois, Count of Chartres, Count of Clermont 1205–1218: Theobald VI, Count of Blois, Count of Chartres, Count of Clermont 1218–1230: Margaret, Countess of Blois Jure uxoris 1218–1230: Walter II, Lord of Avesnes Title held by House of Avesnes.

1230–1241: Mary, Countess of Blois Jure uxoris 1226–1241: Hugh I, Count of Saint-Pol Title held by House of Châtillon. 1241–1280: John I, Count of Blois, Count of Dunois, Lord of Avesnes. 1280–1291: Joan, Countess of Blois, Countess of Dunois Lady of Avesnes. 1291–1307: Hugh II, Count of Blois, Count of Dunois, Lord of Avesnes. 1307–1342: Guy I, Count of Blois, Count of Dunois, Lord of Avesnes 1342–1346: Louis II, Count of Blois, Count of Dunois, Lord of Avesnes. 1346–1372: Louis III, Count of Blois, Count of Dunois, Lord of Avesnes 1372–1381: John II, Count of Blois, Count of Dunois, Lord of Avesnes. 1381–1391: Guy II, Count of Blois, Count of Dunois, Lord of Avesnes After the death of his only son Guy II sell his titles anf fiefdoms to Louis I, Duke of Orléans, who never used the title, like his successors

Honor Smith

Honor Mildred Vivian Smith was an English neurologist who specialised in the treatment of tuberculous meningitis. She worked and taught at the teaching hospitals of the University of Oxford, was appointed OBE in 1962. Honor Smith was born in Essex, she was the sixth of seven children born to Vivian Smith, 1st Baron Bicester, Lady Sybil Mary McDonnell, the daughter of William Randal McDonnell, 6th Earl of Antrim. She had a passion for hunting, inspired by her father, but she decided to pursue a career in medicine, influenced by her mother, instead of becoming master of hounds for the Bicester hunt, she enrolled at the London School of Medicine for Women, where her mother's friend Lady Florence Barrett was dean. She received a BSc in 1937 and graduated from the Royal Free Hospital School of Medicine as MBBS in 1941. Smith began her medical career at the Elizabeth Garrett Anderson Hospital in London, she moved to Oxford, where she worked for Herbert Seddon's peripheral nerve injury unit. She began working for Hugh Cairns's neurosurgery unit at the Radcliffe Infirmary in 1943, where she started her lifelong body of research on meningitis.

Here, she pioneered the use of intrathecal penicillin to treat pneumococcal meningitis. She undertook a research fellowship at the Boston Children's Hospital with a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation in 1948. Smith became a consultant neurologist and established a unit for tuberculous meningitis at Churchill Hospital, she was a reader in medicine at Oxford University from 1954 to 1961, became an honorary fellow of St Hugh's College, Oxford. In 1959, she travelled to Morocco at the request of the World Health Organization to investigate an outbreak of paralysis, discovered to be caused by contamination of cooking oil with orthocresyl phosphate, she was appointed OBE in 1962 for her work on the treatment of tuberculous meningitis and was elected Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians in 1965. After retiring in 1971, Smith lived in Herefordshire, she developed heart failure and died in 1995 at the age of 86

Telemark County Municipality

Telemark County Municipality is the regional governing administration of Telemark, Norway. The main responsibilities of the county municipality includes the running of 29 upper secondary schools, it administrates the county roadways, public transport, dental care and cultural heritage. The county council is led by Gunn Marit Helgesen of the Conservative Party; the administration is located in Skien. The county municipality has 1,544 employees, in 2007, a revenue of 1,508 million kr. Bamble Upper Secondary School Bø vidaregåande skule Croftholmen Upper Secondary School Hjalmar Johansen Upper Secondary School Kragerø Upper Secondary School Lunde vidaregåande skule Notodden Upper Secondary School Porsgrunn Upper Secondary School Rjukan Upper Secondary School Skien Upper Secondary School Skogmo Upper Secondary School Søve Upper Secondary School Vest-Telemark Upper Secondary School