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Duchesne County, Utah

Duchesne County is a county in the northeast part of the U. S. state of Utah. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 18,607, its county seat is Duchesne, the largest city is Roosevelt. Much of Duchesne County was part of the Uintah Reservation, created 1861 by US President Abraham Lincoln as a permanent home of the Uintah and White River Utes; the Uncompahgre Utes were moved to the Uintah and newly created Uncompahgre Indian reservations from western Colorado. At the turn of the century under the Dawes Act, both Indian reservations were thrown open to homesteaders; this was done. The homesteading process was opened on the Uintah on August 27, 1905. Unlike much of the rest of Utah Territory, settlement of the future Duchesne County area did not occur due to LDS Church pressures, it was settled by individuals. Homesteaders were required to prove. After five years of living on the land, making improvements, paying $1.25 per acre, homesteaders were given title to their homesteads. On July 13, 1914 a referendum was presented to voters of Wasatch County to partition the eastern part into a separate county.

The referendum passed, so Utah Governor William Spry issued a proclamation to take effect on January 4, 1915. The county seat was decided by county vote in 1914 election; the new county was named for its county seat, which in turn was called for the Duchesne River which flows southward and eastward through the central part of the county near the city. Its name is of uncertain origin, but the holding theory is that it was named by fur trappers in the 1820s in honor of Mother Rose Philippine Duchesne, founder of the School of the Sacred Heart near St. Louis, although other theories as to the name exist; the county boundary with Uintah County was adjusted by legislative act on March 5, 1917. Duchesne County terrain is semi-arid and scarred with drainages; the Duchesne River drains the central part of the county. The county slopes to the south and east; the county has a total area of 3,256 square miles, of which 3,241 square miles is land and 15 square miles is water. The northern part of the county contains much of the east-west oriented Uinta Mountains.

The highest natural point in Utah, Kings Peak at 13,528 feet, is located in Duchesne County. As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 18,607 people, 6,003 households, 4,703 families in the county; the population density was 5.74/sqmi. There were 6,988 housing units at an average density of 2.16/sqmi. The racial makeup of the county was 89.15% White, 0.24% Black or African American, 4.53% Native American, 0.28% Asian, 0.27% Pacific Islander, 2.64% from other races, 2.89% from two or more races. 6.00 % of the population were Latino of any race. There were 6,003 households out of which 40.23% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.72% were married couples living together, 8.65% had a female householder with no husband present, 21.66% were non-families. 45.0% of all households had individuals under 18 and 22.6% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.05 and the average family size was 3.47. The county population contained 33.91% under the age of 18, 6.56% from 20 to 24, 25.38% from 25 to 44, 20.92% from 45 to 64, 10.66% who were 65 years of age or older.

The median age was 29.7 years. For every 100 females there were 102.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 100.00 males. The median income for a household in the county was $31,298, the median income for a family was $35,350. Males had a median income of $31,988 versus $19,692 for females; the per capita income for the county was $12,326. About 14.20% of families and 16.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.60% of those under age 18 and 12.40% of those age 65 or over. As of 2015 the largest self-reported ancestry groups in Duchesne County, Utah are: Clair Poulson, West Side Precinct Justice Court Judge Dave Boren, Sheriff JoAnn Evans, County Clerk-AuditorDuchesne County voters are traditionally Republican. In no national election since 1964 has the county selected the Democratic Party candidate. Duchesne Myton Roosevelt Altamont Tabiona Bluebell Neola Utah portal List of counties in Utah National Register of Historic Places listings in Duchesne County, Utah Official website

Andre Barnett

Andre Nigel Barnett is an American politician and entrepreneur. He was a candidate for President of the United States as the 2012 nominee of the Reform Party of the United States of America, he is the founder of the information technology company WiseDome Inc. Barnett was born in Zanesville, Ohio in 1976, he attended Western Governors University. As a member of the United States Armed Forces, Barnett served in Sarajevo before being wounded in a helicopter accident. In 2001, he founded WiseDome Incorporated, an IT company that provides information technology and data recovery services. Barnett announced his candidacy for the Reform Party presidential nomination on May 6, 2011, he considers himself a conservative and has stated that he would downsize the federal government if elected. Barnett has been described as a "conservative with a conscience." His candidacy was endorsed by the Frederick Douglass Foundation. At the Reform Party of New Jersey's state convention on April 14, 2012, Barnett defeated former Governor of Louisiana Buddy Roemer in the party's presidential straw poll by a 70% margin.

Barnett was nominated for President of the United States by the Reform Party on August 12, 2012 at the party's National Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Barnett's running mate was Ken Cross; the ticket had write-in status in several other states. Barnett received 962 votes nationwide. Barnett sought the Republican nomination to represent New York's 18th congressional district in 2014. However, he failed to collect enough signatures to be listed on the primary ballot. Barnett and his wife Kimberly reside in New York. Andre Barnett 2012, official campaign site Andre Barnett:On the issues WiseDome Inc. official site Barnett's fitness model site FEC disclosure report for 2012 presidential campaign

Moores Mill, Alabama

Moores Mill is a census-designated place in Madison County, United States, is included in the Huntsville-Decatur Combined Statistical Area. The population was 5,682 at the 2010 census. Moores Mill is located at 34°49′50″N 86°31′14″W. According to the U. S. Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 13.8 square miles, of which 13.6 square miles is land and 0.2 square miles is water. As of the census of 2000, there were 5,178 people, 1,912 households, 1,500 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 373.6 people per square mile. There were 2,030 housing units at an average density of 146.5 per square mile. The racial makeup of the CDP was 77.62% White, 18.58% Black or African American, 1.31% Native American, 0.79% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.10% from other races, 1.58% from two or more races. 0.98% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 1,912 households out of which 38.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.6% were married couples living together, 8.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 21.5% were non-families.

18.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.09. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 27.9% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 22.4% from 45 to 64, 7.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.8 males. The median income for a household in the CDP was $50,292, the median income for a family was $53,750. Males had a median income of $32,303 versus $25,449 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $20,158. About 6.9% of families and 9.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.7% of those under age 18 and 13.8% of those age 65 or over. As of the census of 2010, there were 5,682 people, 2,204 households, 1,673 families residing in the CDP; the population density was 410 people per square mile.

There were 2,354 housing units at an average density of 173.1 per square mile. The racial makeup of the CDP was 70.9% White, 22.6% Black or African American, 1.1% Native American, 1.5% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.9% from other races, 2.8% from two or more races. 2.4 % of the population were Latino of any race. There were 2,204 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 24.1% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.9% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 2.97. In the CDP, the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 26.9% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, 11.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.9 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.2 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $67,449, the median income for a family was $79,010. Males had a median income of $47,981 versus $40,257 for females; the per capita income for the CDP was $30,155. About 6.8% of families and 10.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 9.5% of those age 65 or over

List of Traveller Books

Traveller is an Origins Award winning science fiction role-playing game published by Game Designers' Workshop in 1977. It is a time when interstellar travel has become possible and Humaniti has met other starfaring races. Traveller: 2300 portrayed humans as technologically advanced, but having a level of civilization not far above the present day. Publishers introduced additional material along the Official Traveller Universe timeline. In 2008, Mongoose Publishing reintroduced GDW's popular look and indexing feature separating publications into familiar Books and Adventures. Traveller, by Game Designers' Workshop Traveller Deluxe Edition, by GDW Understanding Traveller, by GDW The Traveller Book, by GDW The Traveller Adventure, by GDW Traveller Starter Edition, by GDW Atlas of the Imperium, by GDW Book 1-Characters and Combat, by GDW Book 2-Starships, by GDW Book 3-Worlds and Adventures, by GDW Book 4-Mercenary, by Frank Chadwick and Marc Miller Book 5-High Guard, by Marc Miller, Frank Chadwick, John Harshman Book 0-An Introduction to Traveller, by GDW Book 6-Scouts, by Marc Miller and Frank Chadwick Book 7-Merchant Prince, by Marc W. Miller Book 8-Robots, by Sr. Joe D. Fugate and Timothy B. Brown Supplement 1-1001 Characters, by Marc Miller Supplement 2-Animal Encounters, by GDW Supplement 3-The Spinward Marches, by Marc Miller Supplement 4-Citizens of the Imperium, by Marc Miller Supplement 5-Lightning Class Cruisers, by GDW Supplement 6-76 Patrons, by Loren Wiseman Supplement 7-Traders and Gunboats, by Marc Miller Supplement 8-Library Data A-M, by Harshman, Miller and Chadwick Supplement 9-Fighting Ships, by Chadwick, Miller and Jaquays Special Supplement 1-Merchant Prince, by J. Andrew Keith, Marc Miller and Loren Wiseman Supplement 10-The Solomani Rim, by John Harshman Supplement 11-Library Data N-Z, by John Harshman, Loren Wiseman and Marc Miller Supplement 12-Forms and Charts, by Marc Miller Supplement 13-Veterans, by Tim Brown Special Supplement 2-Exotic Atmospheres, by J. Andrew Keith Special Supplement 3-Missiles in Traveller, by Marc Miller Adventure 1-The Kinunir, by Marc Miller Adventure 2-Research Station Gamma, by Marc Miller Adventure 3-Twilight's Peak, by Marc Miller Adventure 4-Leviathan, by Bob McWilliams Adventure 0-Introductory Adventure: The Imperial Fringe, by GDW Adventure 5-Trillion Credit Squadron, by Marc Miller and John Harshman Adventure 6-Expedition to Zhodane, by Marc Miller Adventure 7-Broadsword, by Loren Wiseman Adventure 8-Prison Planet, by Eric Wilson and Dave Emigh Adventure 9-Nomads of the World Ocean, by J. Andrew Keith and William H. Keith Adventure 11-Murder on Arcturus Station, by J. Andrew Keith Tarsus: World Beyond the Frontier, by Marc W. Miller and Loren Wiseman Adventure 10-Safari Ship, by Marc Miller Adventure 12-Secret of the Ancients, by Marc Miller BeltStrike: Riches and Danger in the Bowman Belt, by J. Andrew Keith and John Harshman Traveller Adventure 13: Signal GKAdventure 13-Signal GK, by Marc Miller The Spinward Marches Campaign: Adventures in a War-Ravaged Sector, by Marc Miller Alien Realms Double Adventure 1-Shadows/Annic Nova, by GDW Double Adventure 2-Mission on Mithril/Across the Bright Face, by Marc Miller Double Adventure 3-Death Station/Argon Gambit, by Marc Miller and Frank Chadwick Double Adventure 4-Marooned/Marooned Alone, by Loren Wiseman Double Adventure 5-Chamax Plague/Horde, by J. Andrew Keith and William H. Keith Jr.

Double Adventure 6-Night of Conquest/Divine Intervention, by Lawrence Schick, William H. Keith Jr. and J. Andrew Keith Alien Module 1-Aslan, by GDW Alien Module 2-K'kree: Encounters with the Enigmatic Centaurs, by J. Andrew Keith and Loren Wiseman Alien Module 3-Vargr, by J. Andrew Keith and Marc Miller Alien Module 4-Zhodani, by J. Andrew Keith and Marc Miller Alien Module 5-Droyne, by J. Andrew Keith and Marc Miller Alien Module 6-Solomani, by Marc Miller and William H. Keith Jr. Alien Module 7-Hivers, by J. Andrew Keith, Marc W. Miller and Loren K. Wiseman Alien Module 8-Darrians, by Marc W. Miller Imperium, by Marc Miller, Frank Chadwick and John Harshman Snapshot-Close Combat Aboard Starships in the Far Future, by Marc Miller, Paul R. Banner and Frank Chadwick Azhanti High Lightning-Close Combat Aboard Starships in the Far Future, by Frank Chadwick and Marc Miller Dark Nebula, by Marc Miller Mayday Fifth Frontier War: Battles for the Spinward Marches by Marc Miller, Frank Chadwick, John M. Astell and Paul R. Banner Invasion: Earth The Final Battle of the Solomani Rim War, by Marc Miller, Frank Chadwick and John Astell Striker: Rules for 15mm Traveller Miniatures by Marc Miller, Frank Chadwick and John H

Archdeacon

An archdeacon is a senior clergy position in the Syriac Orthodox Church, Church of the East, Chaldean Catholic Church, Anglican Communion, St Thomas Christians, Eastern Orthodox churches and some other Christian denominations, above that of most clergy and below a bishop. In the High Middle Ages it was the most senior diocesan position below a bishop in the Catholic Church. An archdeacon is responsible for administration within an archdeaconry, the principal subdivision of the diocese; the Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church has defined an archdeacon as "A cleric having a defined administrative authority delegated to him by the bishop in the whole or part of the diocese." The office has been described metaphorically as that of oculus episcopi, the "bishop's eye". In the Latin Catholic Church, the post of archdeacon an ordained deacon, was once one of great importance as a senior official of a diocese; the duties are now performed by officials such as auxiliary or coadjutor bishops, the vicar general, the episcopal vicars.

The title remains. The term "archdeacon" appears for the first time in Optatus of Mileve's history of Donatism of about 370, in which he applies it to someone who lived at the beginning of that century. From the office of the diaconus episcopi, a deacon whom the bishop selected to administer the church's finances under the bishop's personal direction, the office of archdeacon developed, as certain functions were reserved to him by law; these functions included not only financial administration but the discipline of the clergy, examination of candidates for priesthood. From the 8th century, there was in the West a further development of the authority of the archdeacon, who now enjoyed a jurisdiction independent of the bishop. Large dioceses had several archdeaconries, in each of which the archdeacon, had an authority comparable to that of the bishop, he was appointed not by the bishop but by the cathedral chapter or the king. However, from the 13th century, efforts were made to limit their authority.

This was effected in part by the institution of the new office of vicar general. In 1553, the Council of Trent removed the independent powers of archdeacons. Those, in charge of different parts of the diocese ceased to be appointed. Only the archdeacon associated with the cathedral chapter continued to exist as an empty title, with duties entirely limited to liturgical functions; the title of archdeacon is still conferred on a canon of various cathedral chapters, the word "archdeacon" has been defined in relation to the Latin Catholic Church as "a title of honour conferred only on a member of a cathedral chapter". However, Eastern Catholic Churches still utilize archdeacons. Archdeacons serve the church within a diocese by taking particular responsibility for buildings, including church buildings, the welfare of clergy and their families and the implementation of diocesan policy for the sake of the Gospel within an archdeaconry. An archdeaconry is a territorial division of a diocese; this type of dual role has only existed in the Bishop suffragan of Ludlow.

An archdeacon is styled The Venerable instead of the usual clerical style of The Reverend. In the Church of England the position of an archdeacon can only be held by a priest, ordained for at least six years. In the Church of England, the legal act by which a priest becomes an archdeacon is called a collation. If that archdeaconry is annexed to a canonry of the cathedral, the archdeacon will be installed at that cathedral. In some other Anglican churches archdeacons can be deacons instead of priests; the Anglican ordinal presupposes that the functions of archdeacons include those of examining candidates for ordination and presenting them to the ordaining bishop. In some parts of the Anglican Communion where women cannot be consecrated as bishops, the position of archdeacon is the most senior office a female cleric can hold: this being the current situation, for example, in the Anglican Diocese of Sydney. "lay archdeacons" have been appointed, most notably in the case of the former Anglican Communion Observer to the United Nations, Archdeacon Taimalelagi Fagamalama Tuatagoloa-Leota, who retained her title after having served as Archdeacon of Samoa.

In the Eastern Christian churches, an archdeacon is the senior deacon within a diocese and has responsibility for serving at hierarchical services. He has responsibility for ensuring the smooth running of the service by directing the clergy and servers as appropriate; as such, he travels with the ruling bishop to various parts of the diocese, will sometimes act as his secretary and cell attendant, ensuring that he is able to balance his monastic life with his hierarchical duties. The archdeacon wears the double orarion, twice the length of the usual orarion, wraps under the right arm as well as hanging from the left shoulder. An archdeacon may come from either the married clergy. A protodeacon wears the double orarion, a

Rotten.com

Rotten.com was a shock site with the tagline "An archive of disturbing illustration," active from 1996 to 2012. It was devoted to morbid curiosities, pictures of violent acts, autopsy or forensic photographs, depictions of perverse sex acts, disturbing or misanthropic historical curiosities. Founded in 1996, it was run by a developer who called himself Soylent, via the company Soylent Communications; the site's updating slowed in 2009, with the final update in February 2012. The website's front page was last archived in January 2018. In late 1996, Soylent wrote a program that surfaced all Internet domain names that appeared in a dictionary, but were not yet registered.'Rotten' was one of the unclaimed words, Soylent created the website after paying for the domain name. The website introduced itself as a bastion of online free speech in an era where censorship rules had begun to strangle the internet. Rotten.com had a spartan layout - no thumbnail images were present next to links, the links themselves had one-line descriptions that dabbled in morbid humor and carried no hints to the content behind them.

Rotten.com's content was composed of user-submitted images, although in rare cases the developers would submit content themselves. The submissions are all marked as real, but could be misattributed. Rotten received an alleged image of medical personnel recovering Princess Diana's body from a car accident, but confirmed it as fake. However, due to wide interest in the crash, they posted the image anyway. Various news outlets attempted to contact the website afterwards, resulting in a large traffic spike. Rotten.com was one of the first websites to publish images of the September 11th jumpers from the Twin Towers, under the title Swan Dive. Rotten.com was threatened with many lawsuits over the years in the form of cease and desist notices. These ranged from serious matters, such as requests to remove pictures of dead relatives from the site, to Burlington Coat Factory asking to take down trenchcoat.org, bought as a Trenchcoat Mafia reference, but linked to Burlington Coat Factory's webpage. On June 24, 2005, the US federal government ordered that the "Fuck of the Month" section of the site be removed, along with content from several ancillary sites.

In posting the page's removal notice, the site's moderator criticized supporters of both Alberto Gonzales and the Bush Administration for the enablement of censorship. The Rotten Library was created as an encyclopedia to supplement the website; the Library contains hundreds of articles under seventeen different headings such as culture, medicine, crime and the occult. Articles contain detailed research and occasional unseen images of events. Rotten had a store that carried t-shirts, stickers and bizarre DVDs. In late 1999, The Daily Rotten was started by Thomas E. Dell. Stories were published daily, focusing on terrorism, suicide, cruelty and abuse. Daily Rotten known as Rotten News, is driven by user submissions which are edited by a self-described "Rotten Staff Duder"; this features comments for each one of the articles, posted by the registered members. They refer to themselves as "rotteneers", a satirical reference to Walt Disney's Mouseketeers, and/or "rottentots". Rotten launched Boners.com in response to viewers who wanted a daily pictures page alongside the Daily Rotten newsboard.

The word "boner" suggests a male organ in a state of arousal. The images consisted of amusing public signs, phallic imagery, members of the public in embarrassing situations. In 2000, The Gaping Maw - an editorial/commentary archive - was founded. Most of the articles were written by cartoonist Tristan Farnon under the alias "Spigot" or by other webmasters; the pages contained news and commentary on modern society. Along with the Rotten Library, this has improved Rotten's standing in many communities since it has introduced a humane and intellectual aspect to the website. On June 22, 2005, The Gaping Maw went dark to comply with new government bookkeeping requirements regarding the distribution of pornography governmental age-verification of models, under 18 U. S. C. § 2257. All articles were taken down, the site's title page was replaced with a statement lamenting the passage of the laws, headed by the banner, "CENSORED BY US GOVERNMENT!". In January 2006, The Gaping Maw came back online with some articles edited.

In November 2003, the Rotten Dead Pool was launched. The Dead Pool was a game in which players picked ten people they believed would pass away over the course of the next 12 months. A point was awarded to a player for each of their correct picks; the only exceptions were that of the pick being executed, murdered, or dying after the 12 months had passed. In mid-2002, Rotten launched an online database. NNDB was a steadily-updated website; the news section ceased updating on January 16, 2016, the celebrity deaths section ceased updating on December 31, 2016. The website itself is still live. Sports Dignity was a gallery of pictures showing embarrassing or NSFW incidents in sports games and tournaments; the I Hate Dick Cheney, John Ashcroft, Donald Rumsfeld, Condi Rice Reader. Avalon Publishing. 2004. ISBN 1-56025-620-6. Salon.com – "The Internet's public enema No. 1" The Rotten Library Original Source Code/Mirror