click links in text for more info
SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Eastern Orthodox liturgical calendar

The Eastern Orthodox Liturgical Calendar describes and dictates the rhythm of the life of the Eastern Orthodox Church. Passages of Holy Scripture and events for commemoration are associated with each date, as are many times special rules for fasting or feasting that correspond to the day of the week or time of year in relationship to the major feast days. There are two types of feasts in the Orthodox Church calendar: fixed and movable. Fixed feasts occur on the same calendar day every year; the moveable feasts are relative to Pascha, so the cycle of moveable feasts is referred to as the Paschal cycle. The following list of dates links only to fixed feasts of the Orthodox Church; these are the fixed dates. All dates having to do with Pascha - the beginning of Great Lent, Pentecost, etc. - are moveable feasts, thus are not on this calendar. These important notes should be remembered in using the following calendar: For the day in the modern Gregorian Calendar. On which churches following the Julian Calendar celebrate any fixed date's commemoration, the 13 days which were lapsed to correct the calendar to the seasons must again lapse, by adding the 13 days to the dates below.

For example, Christmas Day on the Julian Calendar falls on January 7 of the modern Gregorian Calendar. The number of days by which the Gregorian calendar differs from the Julian calendar is 13, but will increase to 14 on March 1, 2100. Over the course of future centuries, the difference will continue to increase, limitlessly. For those churches which follow the Revised Julian Calendar the dates below correspond to the dates on the Gregorian Calendar; the Orthodox liturgical year begins on September 1. Pascha is, by far, the most important day in the ecclesiastical year, all other days, in one way or another, are dependent upon it. Pascha falls on different calendar dates from year to year, calculated according to a strict set of rules. While the Fixed Cycle begins on September 1, the new Paschal Cycle begins on "Zaccheus Sunday" in the Slavic tradition or the "Sunday of the Canaanite Woman" in the Greek tradition, eleven Sundays before Pascha, continues until the Zaccheus Sunday or Sunday of the Canaanite Woman of the following year.

The Epistle and Gospel readings at the Divine Liturgy throughout the year are determined by the date of Pascha. There are Twelve Great Feasts throughout the church year—not counting Pascha, above and beyond all other feast days; these are feasts which celebrate major historical events in the lives of Jesus Christ or the Theotokos. Of these, three are on the Paschal Cycle: Palm Sunday Ascension Pentecost The other Great Feasts are on the Fixed Cycle: The Nativity of the Theotokos — 21 September The Elevation of the Holy Cross — 27 September The Presentation of the Theotokos — 4 December The Nativity of the Lord — 7 January The Theophany of the Lord — 19 January The Presentation of the Lord — 15 February The Annunciation — 7 April The Transfiguration — 19 August The Dormition of the Theotokos — 28 August In addition, the feast day of the patron saint of a parish church or monastery is counted as a Great Feast, is celebrated with great solemnity. In addition to Great Lent, there are three other lesser lenten seasons in the church year: Nativity Fast Apostles' Fast Dormition Fast The season from the Sunday of the Publican and Pharisee through Holy Saturday is called Triodion, while the season from Pascha through Pentecost is called the Pentecostarion.

Because of the complexity created by the intersection of the various cycles, a number of Orthodox institutions will print an annual calendar which contains rubrics for the services during that particular year. Simpler wall calendars will show the major commemoration of the day together with the appointed scripture readings. Byzantine calendar List of Eastern Orthodox saint titles For saints and other commemorations: Orthodox Church Calendar at OrthodoxWiki Complete lives of the saints for every day of the Byzantine liturgical year Lives of the Saints and Feast days Search at Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America Orthodox Calendar at Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church Where to learn and purchase Orthodox Liturgical Calendars For scriptural readings: The Orthodox Study Bible. Nashville, Tennessee: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1993: 771-780

Candy Carol Tour

The Candy Carol Tour was a 1991 U. S. concert tour by American electronic group Book of Love, in support of the act's third studio album, Candy Carol, released in January 1991. The U. S. tour lasted for three months, starting on March 2 and ending on June 1, 1991. The first show of the tour took place at O'dell's in Baltimore, with local synthpop band Moderation opening the show. Throughout the tour, various local bands in each city functioned as the opening act; the tour concluded with the final show in Virginia. For the New York City and Cleveland dates, Marc Roselli, a Jesuit priest and brother of Lauren Roselli, joined Lauren and band onstage to perform his Sanctus section of "Counting The Rosaries"; the setlist was heavy on both new Candy Carol album tracks, tracks from their debut, Book of Love. Sample of a setlist from the tour. "Turn The World" "Butterfly" "Happy Day" "Melt My Heart" "Still Angry" "Quiver" "Counting The Rosaries" "Miss Melancholy" "Orange Flip" "Lost Souls" "Boy" "Sunny Day" "You Make Me Feel So Good" "I Touch Roses" "Alice Everyday" Encore: "Pretty Boys And Pretty Girls" "Book of Love"Other songs played on the tour: "Candy Carol", "Tubular Bells", "With A Little Love","Modigliani" Susan Ottaviano – Lead vocals Ted Ottaviano – Keyboards, vocals Lauren Roselli – Keyboards, vocals Jade Lee – Keyboards, vocals Victor Bridgers – Tour Manager Todd Petersen – Monitor engineer, keyboard tech.

Craig Overbay – Production Manager, house sound John McLaughlinStage Manager Jim Newman – Merchandise Book of Love – "Melt My Heart" & "Still Angry" live in Baltimore, 3/2/91. On YouTube Book of Love – "Lost Souls" live in Baltimore, 3/2/91. On YouTube "Through" by Moderation, opening for Book of Love, live in Baltimore, 3/2/91. On YouTube

List of places in North Lanarkshire

Map of places in North Lanarkshire compiled from this listThe List of places in North Lanarkshire is a list of links for any town, hamlet, castle golf course, historic house, hill fort, nature reserve, reservoir and other place of interest in the North Lanarkshire council area of Scotland. Airbles railway station Airdrie, Airdrie-Bathgate Rail Link, Airdrie Public Library, Airdrie Public Observatory, Airdrie railway station Allanton Annathill Argyle Line Auchinloch Auchinstarry Ballochney Railway Banton Bargeddie, Bargeddie railway station Barons Haugh RSPB Reserve Bathgate and Coatbridge Railway Bellshill, Bellshill railway station Bogside Bonkle Broadwood Stadium Calderbank Caldercruix, Caldercruix railway station Carfin Castle Cary Castle Central Scotland Forest Trust Chapelhall Chryston Cleland, Cleland railway station Cliftonhill Coatbridge, Coatbridge Central railway station, Coatbridge Sunnyside railway station Colzium Croy Cumbernauld, Cumbernauld Airport, Cumbernauld House, Cumbernauld railway station, Cumbernauld town centre Dalzell House Dalziel Park Drumgelloch railway station Dullatur Dumbreck Marsh Excelsior Stadium Fir Park Stadium Forrestfield Gadloch Garrion Bridge Garnkirk Gartcosh Glenboig Glenmavis Greengairs Greendykeside Greenhead Moss Community Park Greenlink Cycle Path Harthill Hartwood Hillend Loch Railway Path, Hillend Reservoir Holytown Kilsyth, Battle of Kilsyth, Kilsyth Castle Longriggend Luggie Water M&Ds Millerston Mollinsburn Monkland and Kirkintilloch Railway, Monkland Canal Moodiesburn Morningside Mossend Motherwell, Motherwell railway station, Motherwell to Cumbernauld Line, Motherwell Shopping Centre Newarthill Newhouse Newmains New Stevenston North Calder Water North Lanarkshire Heritage Centre Netherton Overtown Perchy Pond Plains Queenzieburn Ravenscraig, Ravenscraig Regional Sports Facility, Ravenscraig steelworks Red Burn Riggend River Kelvin Rutherglen and Coatbridge Railway Salsburgh Shieldmuir railway station Shotts South Calder Water Stand Stepps Strathclyde Country Park Summerlee, Museum of Scottish Industrial Life Upperton Viewpark, Viewpark Gardens Wattston Wishaw, Wishaw railway station List of places in Scotland

Carmen Winant

Carmen Winant is a writer and visual artist who explores representations of women through collage, mixed media and installation. Winant was born in 1983 in California, she received her MFA from California College of the Arts, where she studied with the photographer Larry Sultan. In 2010, she was a resident at the Skowhegan School of Sculpture. Winant's large-scale collages present a mosaic of clippings of women's bodies. In the photographic installation My Birth she collected and displayed over 2,000 images of women giving birth. In a book by the same name, Winant includes photos of her mother's childbirths, her work Looking Forward to Being Attacked is composed of found images of women in self defense classes. She makes collages that combine text and image, such as What Would You Do if You Weren’t Afraid?. She taught at the Columbus College of Art and Design in Columbus, Ohio. In August of 2018, she joined The Ohio State University Department of Art faculty as the first Roy Lichtenstein Chair of Studio Art.

2016: Pictures of Women Working, Skibum MacArthur, Los Angeles, California. 2016: Who Says Pain is Erotic?, Fortnight Institute, New York City. Carmen Winant: My Birth, Ithaca, NY: SPBH Editions, 2018. Official website Interview with Carmen Winant MoMA Audio: Being: New Photography 2018

List of Palestinian rocket attacks on Israel in 2017

This is a detailed list of Palestinian rocket and mortar attacks on Israel in 2017. The Israeli military reported that 35 rockets and mortars were launched from the Gaza Strip in 2017, the vast majority of them in December. All of the attacks originated in the Gaza Strip. For information pertaining to the wider conflict, see Arab–Israeli conflict and Israeli–Palestinian conflict; this list does not include reports of deaths and injuries caused by Palestinian rocket and mortar attacks that fell within Gaza. In August 2014, Operation Protective Edge was ended after 4,594 rockets and mortars launched toward Israel. From the end of the operation came into force an unofficial cease-fire between Israel and Hamas. February 6 Around 9am, one rocket was fired from Gaza at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area in Hof Ashkelon Regional Council. February 8 Around 11pm, a barrage of rockets was fired from Sinai at Israel; the Iron Dome defense system intercepted at least 3 rockets over Eilat. February 20 Around 10am, 2 rockets were fired from Sinai at Israel.

Fell inside Israel in an open area in Eshkol Regional Council. February 27 Around 13pm, one rocket was fired from Gaza at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area in the Negev. March 15 Around 10pm, one rocket was fired from Gaza at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area in the Negev. March 18 Around 10am, two rockets were fired from Gaza at Israel. One landed short in Gaza, one fell inside Israel in an open area in the Hof Ashkelon Regional Council. April 10 Around 3pm, one rocket was fired from Sinai at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area in the Eshkol Regional Council. May 23 Around 8am, one rocket was fired from Sinai at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area in the Negev. June 26 Around 11pm, one rocket was fired from Gaza at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area in the Sha'ar Hanegev Regional Council.. July 23 Around 1am, one rocket was fired from Gaza at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area in the Sha'ar Hanegev Regional Council. July 24 Around 1am, one rocket was fired from Gaza at Israel.

It fell inside Israel in an open area in the Eshkol Regional Council. August 8 In August terroism report by Shabak, it was said that in August there had been one rocket attack from Gaza. Around 9pm, one rocket was fired from Gaza at Israel, it fell inside Israel in an open area near the city of Ashkelon. In August terroism report by Shin Bet, it was said that in October there had been one rocket attack from Sinai. November 30 Around 6:30pm, a barrage of 12 mortars were fired from Gaza at Israeli forces near the Gaza border; the IDF retaliated by striking Hamas positions. IDF assessments indicated that the mortars were fired by Palestinian Islamic Jihad. December 7 Around 6pm, on the evening Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh made calls for a third Intifada the day after the United States declared Jerusalem the capital of Israel, media reports a total of 7 rockets were fired from Gaza at Israel; the first fell inside Israel in an open area near the city of Ashkelon. The IDF retaliated by striking Hamas positions.

December 8 Around 7pm, 4 rockets were fired from Gaza towards Israel, 1 rocket landed short in Gaza, 1 was intercepted by the Iron Dome defense system and 2 rockets landed in the city of Sderot causing damage to a kindergarten and several vehicles. The IDF retaliated by striking Hamas positions killing 2 Hamas members and injuring 25 more Palestinians. December 11 Around 7pm, 4 rockets were fired from Gaza towards Israel, 2 rockets landed short in Gaza, 2 rockets landed in open areas near the border fence; the IDF retaliated by striking Hamas positions. Around 11:30 pm, 1 rocket was intercepted by the Iron Dome; the IDF retaliated by striking Hamas positions. December 12 Around 7pm, 1 rocket was fired from Gaza towards Israel, it landed short in Gaza. Around 11pm, 1 rocket was fired from Gaza towards Israel, it landed in an open area in the Hof Ashkelon Regional Council, No damage or injuries were caused; the IDF retaliated by striking Hamas positions. December 13 Around 8:30pm, 4 rockets were fired from Gaza towards Israel, 2 rockets were intercepted by the Iron Dome, 1 rocket landed in an open area in the Eshkol Regional Council and 1 rocket landed short in Gaza.

The IDF retaliated by striking Hamas positions. December 15 A rocket had been fired from Gaza, but it hit within Gaza hitting a residential buildingDecember 17 Around 9pm, 2 rockets fired from Gaza towards Israel landed in Hof Ashkelon Regional Council causing damage to a home; the IDF retaliated by striking 6 Hamas positions. December 21 On the 21'st Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories reported that a mortar, fired toward Israel from Gaza, hit a civilian home in the Gaza Strip. December 29 Around 12pm 3 rockets were fired from Gaza towards Israel, 2 were intercepted by the Iron Dome, 1 rocket fell in the area of Nachal Oz causing damage to a public building; the IDF assessed. ISIL rocket attacks on Turkey

Muzzy Field

Muzzy Field is a stadium in Bristol, Connecticut adjacent to Rockwell Park. It has been in use since 1912 for both football; the brick-faced grandstand, with a capacity of 4,900 people, was built in 1939. It features a ring of tall pine trees that line the outside of the grandstand. Muzzy Field hosts high school sports baseball and football. Three high schools use the field: Bristol Central High School, Bristol Eastern High School, Saint Paul Catholic High School. Muzzy Field is the site of the football "Battle for the Bell" between Bristol Eastern and Bristol Central, held every Thanksgiving morning, with the winner claiming the bell for the following year. In summer, Muzzy Field hosts collegiate baseball teams: since 2015, the Bristol Blues of the New England Collegiate Baseball League. Muzzy Field was the home of the Double-A Bristol Red Sox of the Eastern League from 1972 to 1982. Former Boston Red Sox stars Jim Rice, Fred Lynn, Butch Hobson honed their skills with the "BriSox." The ballpark housed the old Bristol Owls of the Class-B Colonial League in 1949 and 1950, as well as various amateur baseball teams, notably the Bristol En-Dees and the local American Legion team.

The University of Hartford's baseball program used the venue for some home games prior to opening Fiondella Field in 2006. Muzzy Field was the site of the Big East Conference baseball championship tournament from 1985–1995. In 1991, Joe Archambeault put together a barnstorming exhibition New England Grey Sox team, including former Boston Red Sox players and other major-leaguers including Bill "Spaceman" Lee, Mark "The Bird" Fidrych, Bob Stanley, Dick McAuliffe, Dick Radatz, Ozzie Virgil, Mike Stenhouse, they played against a team of local men, the Undefeated Bristol Fradette Agency, on June 1, 1991, in front of 5,000 fans. In 2004 the stadium was the site of an American Idol audition. In 2012 and 2013, the City of Bristol approved a renovation of the ballpark to include a new front entrance and public concourse, new lighting, seating, ADA improvements and a new grandstand enclosure along the Muzzy Street side of the stadium connecting to the existing grandstand. Further renovations in 2015, coinciding with the arrival of the Bristol Blues club, included a new rooftop press box, an extension of the roof, an electronic sign at the corner of Park and Muzzy Streets to advertise events.

Malan, Douglas S.. Muzzy Field: Tales from a Forgotten Ballpark. IUniverse. ISBN 978-1935278849