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History
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An illustration of Je Tsongkhapa, the founder, and his two principal students (Kédrup and Gyeltsap) on his left and right with other lineage teachers
An illustration of Je Tsongkhapa, the founder, and his two principal students (Kédrup and Gyeltsap) on his left and right with other lineage teachers and protectors of the Gelug tradition.
The 14th Dalai Lama (center), the most influential figure of the contemporary Gelug tradition, at the 2003 Kalachakra ceremony, Bodhgaya (India).
The 14th Dalai Lama (center), the most influential figure of the contemporary Gelug tradition, at the 2003 Kalachakra ceremony, Bodhgaya (India).
Khedrup Gelek Pelzang, 1st Panchen Lama (1385–1438 CE), the main leader of the Gelug school after Tsongkhapa's death.
Khedrup Gelek Pelzang, 1st Panchen Lama (1385–1438 CE), the main leader of the Gelug school after Tsongkhapa's death.
Gendun Drup, founder of Tashilhunpo Monastery, and the First Dalai Lama
Gendun Drup, founder of Tashilhunpo Monastery, and the First Dalai Lama
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Inside of a Tibetan Buddhist monastery
Inside of a Tibetan Buddhist monastery
Samye was the first gompa (Buddhist monastery) built in Tibet (775–779).
Samye was the first gompa (Buddhist monastery) built in Tibet (775–779).
The Indian master Atiśa
The Indian master Atiśa
The Tibetan householder and translator Marpa (1012–1097)
The Tibetan householder and translator Marpa (1012–1097)