SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Google Play

Google Play Android Market, is a digital distribution service operated and developed by Google. It serves as the official app store for the Android operating system, allowing users to browse and download applications developed with the Android software development kit and published through Google. Google Play serves as a digital media store, offering music, books and television programs, it offered Google hardware devices for purchase until the introduction of a separate online hardware retailer, Google Store, on March 11, 2015, it offered news publications and magazines before the revamp of Google News on May 15, 2018. Applications are available through Google Play either free of charge or at a cost, they can be downloaded directly on an Android device through the Play Store mobile app or by deploying the application to a device from the Google Play website. Applications exploiting hardware capabilities of a device can be targeted to users of devices with specific hardware components, such as a motion sensor or a front-facing camera.

The Google Play store had over 82 billion app downloads in 2016 and has reached over 3.5 million apps published in 2017. It has been the subject of multiple issues concerning security, in which malicious software has been approved and uploaded to the store and downloaded by users, with varying degrees of severity. Google Play was launched on March 6, 2012, bringing together Android Market, Google Music, the Google eBookstore under one brand, marking a shift in Google's digital distribution strategy; the services included in Google Play are Google Play Books, Google Play Games, Google Play Movies & TV and Google Play Music. Following their re-branding, Google has expanded the geographical support for each of the services; as of 2017, Google Play features over 3.5 million Android applications. Users in over 145 countries can purchase apps, although Google notes on its support pages that "Paid content may not be available in some provinces or territories if the governing country is listed above."

Developers in over 150 locations can distribute apps on Google Play, though not every location supports merchant registration. To distribute apps, developers have to pay a one-time $25 registration fee for a Google Play Developer Console account. App developers can control which countries an app is distributed to, as well as the pricing for the app and in-app purchases in each country. Developers receive 70% of the application price, while the remaining 30% goes to the distribution partner and operating fees. Developers can set up sales, with the original price struck out and a banner underneath informing users when the sale ends. Google Play allows developers to release early versions of apps to a select group of users, as alpha or beta tests. Developers can release apps through staged rollouts, in which "your update reaches only a percentage of your users, which you can increase over time." Users can pre-order select apps to have the items delivered as soon. Some network carriers offer billing for Google Play purchases, allowing users to opt for charges in the monthly phone bill rather than on credit cards.

Users can request refunds within 48 hours after a purchase if "something you bought isn't working, isn't what you expected, was bought by accident, or you changed your mind about the purchase". Apps meeting specific usability requirements can qualify as a Wear OS app. Google Play Games is an online gaming service for Android that features real-time multiplayer gaming capabilities, cloud saves and public leaderboards, achievements; the service was introduced at the Google I/O 2013 Developer Conference, the standalone mobile app was launched on July 24, 2013. Google Play Music is online music locker, it features over 40 million songs, gives users free cloud storage of up to 50,000 songs. As of May 2017, Google Play Music is available in 64 countries. Google Play Books is an ebook digital distribution service. Google Play offers over five million ebooks available for purchase, users can upload up to 1,000 of their own ebooks in the form of PDF or EPUB file formats; as of January 2017, Google Play Books is available in 75 countries.

Google Play Books can be found on the archive.org website available for readers and for download. Google Play Movies & TV is a video on demand service offering movies and television shows available for purchase or rental, depending on availability; as of January 2017, movies are available in over 110 countries, while TV shows are available only in Australia, Canada, Germany, Switzerland, the United States and the United Kingdom. Google Play Newsstand is a news aggregator and digital newsstand service offering subscriptions to digital magazines and topical news feeds. Google released Newsstand in November 2013, combining the features of Google Play Magazines and Google Currents into a single product; as of January 2017, the basic Newsstand service, with topical news feeds, is available worldwide. Paid Newsstand content is available in over 35 countries. On May 15, 2018, the mobile app merged with Google Weather to form Google News; the Newsstand section continued to appear on the Google Play website until November 5, 2018.

Google Play, before March 2015, had a Devices section for users to purchase Google Nexus devices, Chromecasts, other Google-branded hardware, accessories. A separate online hardware retailer called the Google Store was introduced on March 11, 2015, replacing the Devices section of Google Play. On September 23, 2019, Google launched their Google Play Pass games and apps subscripti

List of Sundance Film Festival selections

This is a partial list of films shown at the Sundance Film Festival. Dates: September 6–12. 12–18 Dates: January 17–?? Dates: Jan. 17–23 Dates:??? Dates:??? Dates: January 17–26 Festival dates: January 16–25 Festival dates: January 15–24 Dates: January 20–29 Dates: January 19–27 Dates:??? Dates: January 19–27 Dates: January 19–29 Dates: January 18–28 Dates: January 16–26 Dates: January 15–25 Dates: January 21–31 Dates: January 20–30 Dates: January 18–28 Dates: January 10–20 Dates: January 16–26 See the article 2003 Sundance Film Festival for a full list of award winners. Dates: January 15–25 Dates: January 20–30 19 January - 29 January See the 2006 Sundance Film Festival article for more information and a full list of films screened and award winners. Dates: January 18–28 See the 2007 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 17–January 27 See the 2008 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners.

See the List of films at the 2008 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 15 - January 25 See the 2009 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 21 - January 31 See the 2010 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 20 - January 30 See the 2011 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 19 - January 29 See the 2012 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 17 - January 27 See the 2013 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown.

January 16 - January 26 See the 2014 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 22 - February 1 See the 2015 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of award winners. See the List of films at the 2015 Sundance Film Festival article for a full list of films shown. January 21 - January 31 January 19 - January 29 Sundance Film Festival: Films Honored 1985-2008. Sundance Institute

Jim Jeffords

James Merrill Jeffords was an American politician who served as a U. S. Senator from Vermont. Sworn into the Senate in 1989, he served as a Republican until 2001, when he left the party to become an independent and began caucusing with the Democrats. Jeffords retired from the Senate in 2007. Prior to serving in the Senate, he served as the U. S. Representative for Vermont's at-large congressional district from 1975 to 1989; the son of Olin M. Jeffords, who served as Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court, James Jeffords was born in Rutland, Vermont, he graduated from Yale University, served for three years in the United States Navy, attended Harvard Law School, from which he received his degree in 1962. Jeffords practiced law in southern Vermont and became a resident of Shrewsbury, where he was active in local politics and government as a Republican, including serving as chairman of the town's Republican committee, he served one term in the Vermont Senate, two as Attorney General of Vermont. He lost the 1972 Republican primary for Governor of Vermont, but won the election for Vermont's lone seat in the United States House of Representatives in 1974.

He served in the House from 1975 to 1989. Jeffords served in the Senate from 1989 until 2007, winning reelection in 1994 and 2000. In 2001, he made national headlines when he left the Republican Party to become an independent, began to caucus with the Senate's Democrats, his switch changed control of the Senate from Republican to Democratic, the first time a switch had changed party control. During his Senate career, Jeffords served as chairman of the Public Works and Health, Education and Pensions Committees. In 2005, Jeffords announced that he would not run for reelection in 2006, would retire at the end of his term, he was succeeded by Bernie Sanders. Jeffords retired to Shrewsbury in 2007. After the death of his wife, he moved to the Washington, DC area to live closer to his children, he died in 2014 from complications associated with Alzheimer's disease, was buried in Shrewsbury. Jeffords was born in Rutland, the son of Marion and Olin Merrill Jeffords, who served as Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court.

According to Jeffords, his mother was a relative of French architect Georges-Eugène Haussmann. Jeffords graduated from Yale University in 1956 and Harvard Law School in 1962. After three years of active duty in the United States Navy, Jeffords served in the Naval Reserves until retiring as a Captain in 1990. During 1962 and 1963 he was a law clerk for Ernest W. Gibson Jr. Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Vermont, afterwards practicing law in Rutland. A longtime resident of Shrewsbury, Jeffords became active in politics and government in the 1960s as Shrewsbury's Grand Juror, Town Agent and Zoning Administrator, in addition to serving as chairman of the town's Republican committee, he served as Rutland County's chairman of the Board of Property Tax Appeals. Jeffords married Elizabeth "Liz" Daley twice, first in 1961. On August 26, 1986, they married again. Liz Jeffords died on the morning of April 2007, after a long struggle with ovarian cancer. Jeffords and his wife had two children and Laura, both of whom live and work in the Washington, D.

C. area. After his wife's death, Jeffords resided in Washington, D. C. a move he made in order to live near his son and daughter. Jeffords won a seat in the Vermont State Senate in 1966, he followed that success in 1968 with a victory in the race for Attorney General of Vermont. He was a Presidential Elector for Vermont in 1972, voted for reelection of the Nixon-Agnew ticket. Jeffords sought the Republican Party nomination for governor in 1972, but was defeated in the primary by Luther "Fred" Hackett. In 1974, after winning the Republican nomination with a plurality in a three-way race, he won Vermont's sole seat in the U. S. House of Representatives, where he served for 14 years. Jeffords was a member of the Agriculture and Education and Labor Committees, rose through seniority to become the ranking Republican on Education and Labor. Jeffords was the only Republican to vote against the Ronald Reagan tax cuts of 1981, was a supporter of both abortion rights and expanded protections for the rights of gays and lesbians.

In addition, he was recognized as a moderate-to-liberal Republican because of his pro-environment positions and his support for the National Endowment for the Arts. In 1988, Jeffords was elected to the U. S. Senate, was reelected in 1994 and 2000. Jeffords long favored expanded access to health care, supported the plan offered by Bill Clinton in the early 1990s. In February 1998, after David Satcher was confirmed by the Senate for U. S. Surgeon General, President Clinton issued a statement thanking Jeffords and several other senators "for their strong support for this qualified nominee."He was one of only five Republican senators who voted to acquit Clinton after Clinton was impeached by the U. S. House in 1999. In October 1999, Jeffords was one of four Republicans to vote in favor of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; the treaty was designed to ban underground nuclear testing and was the first major international security pact to be defeated in the Senate since the Treaty of Versailles. Jeffords' work in Congress focused on legislation involving education, job training and individuals with disabilities.

In his years in the Senate, his emphasis shifted somewhat, as he pushed through Congress several important pieces of environmental legislations. He was, together with Paul Simon, credited by Canadian Lie