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Inner Harbor

The Inner Harbor is a historic seaport, tourist attraction, landmark of the city of Baltimore, Maryland. It was described by the Urban Land Institute in 2009 as "the model for post-industrial waterfront redevelopment around the world"; the Inner Harbor is located at the mouth of Jones Falls, creating the wide and short northwest branch of the Patapsco River. The district includes any water west of a line drawn between the foot of President Street and the American Visionary Art Museum; the name "Inner Harbor" is used not just for the water but for the surrounding area of the city, with approximate street boundaries of President Street to the east, Lombard Street to the north, Greene Street to the west, Key Highway on the south. The harbor is within walking distance of M&T Bank Stadium. A water taxi connects passengers to Fells Point and Fort McHenry. While Baltimore has been a major U. S. seaport since the 18th century, the shallow water of the Inner Harbor was not conducive to large ships or heavy industry.

These were concentrated in Locust Point, Fell's Point, Canton. In the mid-20th century, Baltimore suffered from the economic decline of restructuring common to many industrial cities in the United States. Old harbors were abandoned with the arrival of container ships after World War II; the old harbors were adapted as focal points to reconnect cities with their waterfronts, develop public spaces, tourism and housing. During the 1940s, John H. Threadgill, the head of the Steamship Trade Association, initiated a study for a cross-harbor bridge. A bridge across the Inner Harbor of Baltimore was one idea, discussed frequently. In his capacity as head of the association, Threadgill recommended that the idea for a cross-harbor bridge be abandoned, due to the fact that Baltimore relied on a shipping trade and fears that the bridge would negatively impede the flow of shipping traffic at the Port of Baltimore. Threadgill was named head of Baltimore's Port Commission during the 1950s. In the 1950s, economic changes ended both the freight and passenger use of the Inner Harbor, such as the Old Bay Line's steamers.

Rotting warehouses and piers were torn down and replaced by open, grass-covered parkland, used for recreational purposes and occasional large events. The waterfront was transformed with award-winning parks and plazas surrounded by office buildings and leisure attractions, which reversed the city's decline and became a model for urban renaissance in cities around the world; the renewal of Baltimore's Inner Harbor area began with the adoption of the 33-acre Charles Center project by the City Council and Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro in March 1958. Between 1958 and 1965, Baltimore renewed the center of its business district by rebuilding Charles Center with office buildings and retail shops. At the beginning of mayor Theodore R. McKeldin's second term in 1963, the redevelopment program was expanded to include 240 acres surrounding the Inner Harbor. Corporate headquarters and hotels were built around the shoreline of the Inner Harbor. A public park and promenade were added for leisure community gatherings.

On July 4, 1976, following the rendezvous of Tall Ships in New York for the U. S. Bicentennial, eight ships from other nations visited Baltimore, where they attracted a huge number of tourists; this interest helped spur the development of other tourist attractions – including the National Aquarium, Maryland Science Center, the Harborplace festival marketplace, which opened on July 4, 1980. The nearby Baltimore Convention Center and Hyatt Regency Baltimore Hotel added to the services and resulted in population density and visitors. With the success of the Inner Harbor in the 1970s and 1980s, Baltimore became a worldwide tourist destination and model of urban planning and development, it influenced more than 100 other cities and won more than 40 national or international awards, including a citation by the American Institute of Architects in 1984 as "one of the supreme achievements of large-scale urban design and development in U. S. history". In recent years, the area along the waterfront to the east of the Inner Harbor has been developed with condominiums, retail space and hotels – an ongoing project known as Harbor East.

While little development land remains around the Inner Harbor, the available land has been subject to many plans, which have not been realized. Completed projects include mixed-use developments incorporating office space, street-level retail, condominiums, as well as hotel projects such as the Ritz Carlton Residences, a condominium project on Key Highway at the southeast corner of the Inner Harbor. In September 2003, the Inner Harbor area was flooded by Hurricane Isabel; the Baltimore World Trade Center remained closed for a month, but all the other buildings were saved from flooding by the Inner Harbor development controls, which were created by the master developer team of Charles Center-Inner Harbor Management, Inc. In March 2004, a water taxi capsized during a storm on the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River near Fort McHenry. While occurring over a mile downstream of the Inner Harbor, the accident was associated with the Inner Harbor by news reports and casual observers. Five passengers died in the accident, which the National Transportation Safety Board determined was caused when the small pontoon-style vessel encountered unpredictable strong winds and waves.

Reginald F. Lewis Museum of African-American History and Culture American Visionary Art Museum Baltimore Museum of Industry Geppi's Entertainment Museum Jewish Muse

Decorations of the Romanian Royal House

The Decorations of the Romanian Royal House are a reward for conspicuous and special merits of the recipients for the Romanian state and the Romanian Royal House. After the Fundamental Rules of the Royal House of Romania were signed in 2007, former King Michael I, who abdicated in 1947 under communist pressure, reinstituted the Order of Carol I and the Order of the Crown, he instituted three decorations and two medals; the orders and medals awarded are: The Order of Carol I The Order of the Crown The decorations and medals listed below The Royal Decoration of the Custodian of the Romanian Crown is a Royal Decoration of the House of Romania instituted on the 18th of January 2015 by Crown Princess Margareta of Romania to symbolise a quarter of a century since her arrival to Romania after a 42-year exile of the Romanian royal family. The DecorationThe Decoration is honoured to Members of the House of Romania and both men and women for participating and making possible the return of the members of the Romanian royal family and for promoting the royal family to people in their work of the restoration of Romania after the years of suffering of the Romanian people.

The Decoration may be awarded to current and former ambassadors or foreign Romanians who have brought an undeniable contribution to Romania's relations with the world. The Decoration may be awarded to institutions or organisations, whose work is circumscribed for the above criteria. StatutesThe maximum number of Members of the Decoration is 400, this includes institutions and organisations; the Decoration is celebrated on the 3rd of May every year, the birthday of Queen Helen, Queen Mother of Romania born in 1898, the mother of King Michael I. The Sovereign and Grand Master Knights both receive their version of the Decoration, either a Medal or a bow formed Medal. Male recipients are Knights of the Decoration and receive a Medal which can be worn on special occasions with a dark suit, tuxedo or tails. Female recipients from the House of Romania are Knights of the Decoration, other females are Dames of the Decoration. CharacteristicsThe Special Class Knights Decoration is crafted in White Gold, of an oval shape and consists of 25 Sapphires and at the top with the Crown of Romania which hangs from the ribbon.

The Knight/Dame 1st Class' Decoration is crafted in Gold and is smaller than that of the Sovereign and Grand Master Knights' and at the top is the Crown of Romania which hangs from the ribbon. The Knight/Dame 2nd Class' Decoration is crafted in White Gold and is the same size of the 1st Class Decoration and at the top with the Crown of Romania which hangs from the ribbon. On the obverse of all classes of the Decoration is the effigy of Crown Princess Margareta, with the circular inscription "Custodian of the Romanian Crown". On the reverse of all classes of the Decoration is the royal monogram of Crown Princess Margareta; the Ribbon for the Medal and bow formed Medal is Dark Blue with Silver stripes on the sides, the same as the Order of the Crown. Crown Princess Margareta Princess Elena Princess Sophie Princess Marie Nicholas de Roumanie Medforth-Mills Florin Iacobescu, Legal representative of the House of Romania Crown Princess Margareta Secondary School Countess Susannah Antamoro de Cespedes, Representative leader of FPMR Jean Milligan David, Representative of FPMR in Switzerland Alexandra Dăriescu, Acclaimed Romania Pianist The Royal Decoration of Nihil Sine Deo is a Royal Decoration of the House of Romania instituted on the 30th of December 2009 by former King Michael I of Romania.

The Decoration may be awarded to current and former ambassadors or foreign Romanians who have brought an undeniable contribution to Romania's relations with the world. The Decoration may be awarded to institutions or organisations, if their work is circumscribed for the above criteria; the maximum number of Members of the Decoration is 200, this includes institutions and organisations. The Decoration is celebrated on the 20th of April every year, the birthday of King Carol I of Romania born in 1839 and the day he was elected Ruler of the United Principalities in 1866. Male recipients are Knights of the Decoration and receive a Medal which can be worn on special occasions with a dark suit, tuxedo or tails. Female recipients are Knights of the Decoration. Organisation recipients are called Members of the Decoration and receive the Medal, placed in the location of the organisation; the Decoration is crafted in bronze and white enamel which consists of an oval with a length of 45mm and at the top with the Crown of Romania which hangs from the ribbo

Sky Is Over

"Sky Is Over" is a song by Serj Tankian. The song was released as the second single from Tankian's debut solo album Elect the Dead; the song has charted on both the Modern Rock Tracks and the Mainstream Rock Tracks in the US. All songs written by Tankian; this song is worked around the website. This means that the song is about global warming. Tankian said about the meaning of the song, in an interview with Roadrunner Records: Elect the Dead was accompanied by a complete set of videos for each track, September 11, 2007. Tankian was not pleased by the original video and so he and director Tony Petrossian made an official video for "Sky Is Over", released on January 16, 2008; the music video begins with Tankian playing a white piano in the middle of the street. After establishing the main piano melody, he gets up, walks down the street, picks up a chalkboard eraser. With the eraser he begins "erasing" the sky out with erratic swipes over the wordless chorus throws the eraser far away and walks to a black piano to play the last note.

The camera pans up to reveal. The entire video was shot in one take. At the end of the video a web address is shown for the now defunct "Sky Is Over" website, which gave links to various environmental organizations. Serj Tankian's website