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The X Factor (Greek TV series)

The X Factor is the Greek version of The X Factor, a show originating in the United Kingdom. It is a television music talent show contested by aspiring pop singers drawn from public auditions. Auditions are held in Greece in the cities of Athens and Thessaloniki, as well as in Cyprus in the city of Nicosia. Auditions for the third X Factor were held in New York City. Applicants from the Greek diaspora are accepted; the show was broadcast live in Greece and Cyprus, as well as abroad via ANT1's international stations, for the first three seasons. For the fourth and fifth season was broadcast live in Greece via Skai TV and in Cyprus via Sigma TV. From sixth season is broadcast live in Cyprus via Omega; the winners of the show are: in the 1st season was Loukas Yorkas, in the 2nd was Stavros Michalakakos, in the 3rd was Harry Antoniou, in the 4th was Andreas Leontas, in the 5th was Panagiotis Koufogiannis and in the 6th was Giannis Grosis. There are four stages to the competition: Stage 1: Judges' auditions – either in an audition room or an arena Stage 2: Bootcamp Stage 3: Judges Houses Stage 3: Four-Chair Challenge Stage 4: Live Shows To date, five series have been broadcast, as summarised below.

Contestant in "Boys" category Contestant in "Girls" category Contestant in "Groups" category Contestant in "Over 25s" category Key: – Winning judge/category. Winners are in other contestants in small font; the first series of the Greek X Factor started airing in October 2008 on ANT1 and was hosted by singer Sakis Rouvas. The judges were Giorgos Levendis, songwriter Giorgos Theofanous, marketing executive of ANT1 TV, Katerina Gagaki and music critic Nikos Mouratidis; the winner of the 1st X-Factor was Loukas Yorkas, who released his debut EP album on September 2009. A second series of X Factor was broadcated by ANT1 TV; the live shows debuted on October 30. The host and the judges remain the same as in the first series; the winner of the 2nd X-Factor was Stavros Michalakakos. A third season of X Factor was broadcast from October 2010 to February 2011; the third series of X Factor was won by Greek-Cypriot Haris Antoniou. The program was broadcast by ANT1 TV and the host and the judges remained the same as the previous year.

A fourth season of X Factor was broadcast from 4 April to 8 July 2016 on Skai TV. The host Sakis Rouvas remained with Evaggelia Aravani in backstage. Giorgos Theofanous remained from the judges of the past seasons with Peggy Zina and Thodoris Marantinis from Onirama being the new judges; the winner of this series was Andreas Leontas from Cyprus. A fifth season of X Factor was broadcast from April 27 to July 20, 2017 on Skai TV; the host Sakis Rouvas remained with Evaggelia Aravani in backstage. Tamta remained from the judges of the past seasons with Giorgos Mazonakis, Giorgos Papadopoulos and Babis Stokas being the new judges; the winner of this series was Panagiotis Koufogiannis from Cyprus. A sixth season of X Factor began broadcast from 11 September 2019 on Open TV; the judges are Giorgos Theofanous, who returned for his fifth series as judge, former The Voice of Greece coach Melina Aslanidou, former Rising Star judge Christos Mastoras and Athens DeeJay Michael Tsaousopoulos. Despina Vandi will be the host.

Aris Makris is presenting the Backstage of Live Shows. Greek Idol The Voice of Greece Official Website

Jeff Faux

Jeff Faux is the principal founder of the Economic Policy Institute and was its first president, from 1986 to 2002. He is now the Institute’s Distinguished Fellow and serves on its board of directors. Faux was educated at Queens College, George Washington University, Harvard University, he is the author of The Servant Economy, The Global Class War, The Party’s Not Over and co-author of Reclaiming America, Rebuilding America and The Star-Spangled Hustle. The Global Class War was translated into Arabic. In 2009, New York Times reporter John Harwood wrote: “’The distribution of income and opportunity is to dominate the next stage of American politics,’ Jeff Faux predicted in ‘The Global Class War’ in 2006. …Then last fall, the financial crisis shoved other concerns aside and began to vindicate Mr. Faux’s prediction.”Faux is a contributing editor to Dissent Magazine and The American Prospect and serves on the board of directors of Campaign for America's Future. Faux has received a Carnegie Scholar Award from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Weinberg Award from Wayne State University, a fellowship at the Harvard Institute of Politics, an honorary doctorate from the University of New England.

Prior to starting the Economic Policy Institute, he was the co-director of the Center for Economic Alternatives. He is a former economist for the U. S. Departments of State and Labor, former director of economic development for the U. S. Office of Economic Opportunity; the Servant Economy The Global Class War The Party’s Not Over Reclaiming America Rebuilding America The Star-Spangled Hustle Appearances on C-SPAN

Oregon, Missouri

Oregon is a city and county seat of Holt County, United States. The population was 857 at the 2010 census. Oregon was called Finley, under that name was platted in 1841; the present name refers to the Oregon Country, at the time considered a prime destination of pioneer emigrants passing through the area. A post office called Oregon has been in operation since 1843. Oregon is located at 39°59′12″N 95°8′33″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.00 square mile, all land. As of the census of 2010, there were 857 people, 356 households, 235 families living in the city; the population density was 857.0 inhabitants per square mile. There were 401 housing units at an average density of 401.0 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 98.4% White, 0.5% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.2% of the population. There were 356 households of which 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.4% had a male householder with no wife present, 34.0% were non-families.

29.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.79. The median age in the city was 45.4 years. 19.7% of residents were under the age of 18. The gender makeup of the city was 48.5% male and 51.5% female. As of the census of 2000, there were 935 people, 348 households, 243 families living in the city; the population density was 931.0 people per square mile. There were 395 housing units at an average density of 393.3 per square mile. The racial makeup of the city was 98.40% White, 0.53% Native American, 0.11% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.11% of the population. There were 348 households out of which 34.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.6% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 29.9% were non-families. 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.1% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older.

The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.08. In the city, the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 26.3% from 25 to 44, 18.6% from 45 to 64, 22.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 88.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.6 males. The median income for a household in the city was $34,250, the median income for a family was $41,932. Males had a median income of $33,750 versus $18,417 for females; the per capita income for the city was $15,441. About 5.3% of families and 7.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.1% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over. The 1928 Oregon boys' basketball, which featured future University of Missouri coach Wilbur Stalcup, won the state basketball tournament at a time when Missouri did not have divisions for its schools; the team reached the quarterfinals of the National Interscholastic Basketball Tournament to determine a national champion.

At the time, Oregon did not have a gymnasium. Oregon's team consisted of a total of 10 players, it practiced on an outdoor court and inside the Methodist Church. The Holt County Museum & Research Center is located in Missouri. Oregon has the Oregon Public Library. Edward Coke Crow, former United States Democratic Attorney General Wilbur Stalcup, former University of Missouri basketball head coach Nave & McCord Mercantile Company Historic maps of the area in the'Sanborn Maps of Missouri' Collection at the University of Missouri Oregon, Missouri Holt County

Gari Uranga

Garikoitz'Gari' Uranga Luluaga is a Spanish retired footballer. A left winger, he could operate as a forward. Uranga was born in Tolosa. A product of Basque Country giants Real Sociedad's youth system, he played one game for its first team in 2001–02's La Liga spent two seasons on loan in the second division, being instrumental to Getafe CF's first top flight promotion. During the next four seasons after his return, Uranga would be used by Real Sociedad, for instance going through 33 scoreless matches during 2005–06 and missing several months in the following campaign, which ended in relegation after 40 years, due to a knee injury, his father Luis was club president during that period. After his contract expired, Uranga signed a two-year deal with CD Castellón in the second level, he retired in June 2010 at only 30 after the Valencian Community side suffered relegation, having appeared in 225 games both major levels of Spanish football combined during his eight-year professional career. Gari Uranga at BDFutbol Gari Uranga at Soccerway

Sayyed Muhammad Mazahar Ali Akbar Naqvi

Sayyed Muhammad Mazahar Ali Akbar Naqvi is a Pakistani jurist, serving as Justice of Lahore High Court since 19 February 2010. Naqvi was born on 1 September 1960 in Gujranwala city located in Punjab province of Pakistan. Naqvi has served as inspection judge of Gujrat District, he has been an advocate of the high court since 1988 and went on to become an advocate of the Supreme Court of Pakistan in 2001. He was appointed as the justice of the Lahore High Court on 19 February 2010. Naqvi is a member of visiting faculty at Punjab Judicial Academy. In 2013, his decision to grant bail to an accused after rejecting previous two pleas for the same became the reason for a 2014 judgement by Supreme Court of Pakistan in which it issued detailed guidelines for high court judges and magistrates regarding future bail applications. In 2016, he was subject to a show-cause notice from Supreme Judicial Council of Pakistan due to an alleged misconduct. Naqvi filed a petition challenging the jurisdiction of SJC terming its "rules against the spirit of constitution”.

In the same year, his seniority was changed and he was made senior to Muhammad Farrukh Irfan Khan by chief justice of Lahore High Court Syed Mansoor Ali Shah but that decision was suspended by the supreme court of Pakistan. In 2017, he heard the case to make the model town massacre case report public and directed the Punjab government to do so in result of that hearing. In November 2017, he was taken off of the Punjab Saaf Paani Company case, pending in his court. Raising an objection to that, he excused himself from hearing another case, against the detention of Hafiz Saeed saying "I'm not going to hear this case, How the judiciary could work independently in such circumstances. Interference in judicial work is awful." In 2018, he was member of the bench hearing a case against former Prime Minister of Pakistan Nawaz Sharif and his daughter Maryam Nawaz in which both of them were accused of making anti-judiciary speeches. During the hearing of that case, Naqvi had a heated argument with the lawyer of the accused over the latter's objection on inclusion of a judge in the bench, associated with Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf.

As a result of that case, the bench ordered Pakistan Electronic Media Regulatory Authority to stop airing the anti-judiciary speeches of Nawaz Sharif and other Pakistan Muslim League leaders. He headed the bench which sent Waseem Akhtar Shaikh to jail for one month for organizing an anti-judiciary rally. Naqvi headed the contempt of court case against former federal cabinet minister Ahsan Iqbal. Naqvi headed the bench hearing the case of Preston Institute of Management Science and Technology's students against non-confirmation of their degrees and issued an order to put university's owner on Exit Control List, he was part of the full bench which heard the contempt of court case against president of Multan branch of Lahore High Court Bar Association, Sher Zaman Qureshi, ordering his arrest which resulted in a riot by lawyers. When Fawad Chaudhry was disqualified from contesting 2018 Pakistani general election by an election tribunal, the bench headed by Naqvi suspended that decision and allowed Chaudhry to contest the election.

He was head of the bench which allowed former prime minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi to contest the 2018 election from NA-57 after he was too disqualified by an election tribunal. During a case against Shahid Khaqan Abbasi, Naqvi issued bailable arrest warrants for Abbasi when he did not appear in the court on 10 September 2018