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Kyal Horsley

Kyal Horsley is an Australian rules footballer who played for the Gold Coast Football Club in the Australian Football League. From Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, he also played with the Kalgoorlie City Football Club in the Goldfields Football League and the Subiaco Football Club in the West Australian Football League, where he finished runner-up in the 2011 Sandover Medal to Luke Blackwell. Horsley was drafted by Gold Coast with the second pick in the 2012 Rookie Draft, made his debut for the club in round five of the 2012 season, he was delisted by the club after 14 games. Horsley returned to the Subiaco Football Club in 2014 to captain the WAFL side for the 2014 season. Horsley had a powerful return to the WAFL finishing third in the Sandover Medal count after leading the Lions to their 12th premiership. Horsley was raised in Kalgoorlie, in the Goldfields region of Western Australia, he excelled in a number of sports at junior level, playing A-grade field hockey and cricket, representing Western Australia at hockey at under-15 and under-16 level.

Horsley made his debut for the Kalgoorlie City Football Club in 2003, at the age of 16, won the Mitchell Medal as the best player in the Goldfields Football League in 2006. Despite wishing to remain in Kalgoorlie, he was recruited to the Subiaco Football Club in the West Australian Football League in 2007. Horsley made his debut against East Fremantle in round 16 of the 2007 season, kicking two goals and recording 21 disposals, played a total of 10 reserves games and seven senior games during the season; the following season, he played 21 games as an inside midfielder, winning the Football Budget's award for the Best First Year Player, tying with Adam Cockie for Subiaco's Rookie of the Year award. Horsley made his state debut for Western Australia in 2008 against Queensland in Townsville, played in the interstate game in 2010. In 2011, he played 23 games, including the grand final loss to Claremont, won the Tom Outridge Medal as Subiaco's best and fairest player, as well as finishing runner-up in the Sandover Medal to Luke Blackwell as the best player in the league.

Speculated as a selection in either the 2011 National Draft or the 2012 Rookie Draft, Horsley was taken by Gold Coast with the second pick in the Rookie Draft. He had been invited to train with Fremantle, prior to the start of the 2008 season, but was not drafted. Horsley spent the first few rounds of the season with Gold Coast's reserves team in the North East Australian Football League, but was elevated from the rookie list to the senior list after Jarrod Harbrow received a long-term injury, he made his debut the following week against North Melbourne at Docklands Stadium, replacing the injured Gary Ablett, recorded 19 disposals and eight tackles. Overall, Horsley played 13 games in his first year, was considered one of the club's better players throughout the latter half of the season, with The Gold Coast Bulletin noting that he provided "that dash of maturity so needed in a young club". At the club's Club Champion Awards held at the end of the season, Horsley received both the "Most Professional" award and the "Iron Man" award.

He was upgraded to Gold Coast's senior list for the 2013 season in October 2012, during the 2012–13 off-season. Horsley played only senior game during the 2013 season, after rupturing his anterior cruciate ligament midway through the season, he was delisted by the Suns at the end of the season, returned to Perth at the end of the season. Horsley returned to the WAFL with the Subiaco Football Club where he was announced captain in the pre-season. Horsley recovered from his anterior cruciate ligament injury for Round Four against Peel, he amassed 499 disposals from 19 games on the season as well as leading Subiaco to their 12th WAFL premiership over the East Perth Royals. Kyal Horsley's profile on the official website of the Gold Coast Football Club Kyal Horsley's playing statistics from AFL Tables Kyal Horsley's WAFL statistics

Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 1976

The Sexual Offences Act 1976 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It made provision in relation to rape and related offences. Except for subsections and and and of section 7, the whole Act is repealed. Section 7 now provides the definition of the expression "a rape offence" in relation to court martial proceedings; the other remaining provisions are purely supplemental. In England and Wales and Northern Ireland, from 1 September 2001section 57 of the International Criminal Court Act 2001 provides that any reference in this Act to a specific substantive offence includes an offence under section 51 involving conduct constituting that offence, and, as if any reference in those provisions to a specific ancillary offence includes that ancillary offence in relation to an offence under section 51 involving conduct constituting the substantive offence in question, an offence under section 52 involving conduct constituting that ancillary offence in relation to an act to which that section applies involving conduct constituting the substantive offence in question.

Subsection provided a definition of the word "rape". It was repealed by section 168 of, Schedule 11 to, the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. Subsection was amended by section 168 of, Schedule 10 to, that Act, it was repealed by paragraph 20 of Schedule 6 to, Schedule 7 to, the Sexual Offences Act 2003. This section was amended by section 168 of, paragraphs 35 and of Schedule 10 to, the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994; this section was repealed on the 4 December 2000 by section 67 of, Schedule 6 to, the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999. This section was amended by section 47 of, paragraph 23 of Schedule 1 to, the Criminal Procedure and Investigations Act 1996; the amended text applied only in relation to alleged offences into which no criminal investigation had begun before 1 April 1997. This section was repealed on the 4 December 2000 by section 67 of, Schedule 6 to, the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999; this section was amended by Schedule 5 to the Cable and Broadcasting Act 1984, section 158 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988, Schedule 20 to the Broadcasting Act 1990, sections 168 and of, paragraph 13 of Schedule 9 to, paragraph 36 of Schedule 10 to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994.

It was repealed in part by Schedule 16 to the Criminal Justice Act 1988, Schedule 21 to the Broadcasting Act 1990. This section was repealed by section 67 of, Schedule 6 to, the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999. Broader provisions for the anonymity of complainants in sexual offence cases were established by the Sexual Offences Act 1992. Subsections and were substituted for subsection by section 158 of, paragraph 16 of Schedule 8 to, the Criminal Justice Act 1988; the words "or man" in both places and the words "or him" were inserted in subsection on 3 November 1994 by section 168 of, paragraph 36and of Schedule 10 to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. The words "name nor the address of the woman or man", "that person’s lifetime" and "identify that person" in subsection were substituted on 3 November 1994 by section 168 of, paragraph 36, of Schedule 10 to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994; the words "included in a relevant programme for reception" in subsection and and the words "inclusion in a relevant programme" in subsection were substituted by section 203 of, paragraph 26 of Schedule 20 to, the Broadcasting Act 1990.

The words "or man" were inserted in subsection on 3 November 1994 by section 168 of, paragraph 36 of Schedule 10 to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. The words "that person’s lifetime" in subsection 1 were substituted on 3 November 1994 by section 168 of, paragraph 36 of Schedule 10 to the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. If at a trial... the judge is satisfied that the effect of subsection of this section is to impose a substantial and unreasonable restriction upon the reporting of proceedings at the trial and that it is in the public interest to remove or relax the restriction, he shall direct that that subsection shall not apply to such matter... as is specified in the direction. The words "before the Crown Court at which a person is charged with a rape offence" and "relating to the complainant" were repealed by sections 158 and 170 of, paragraph 16 of Schedule 8 to, Schedule 16 to, the Criminal Justice Act 1988; the words "the outcome of" were substituted for the words "an acquittal of a defendant" by section 158 of, paragraph 16 of Schedule 8 to, the Criminal Justice Act 1988.

This subsection created a summary offence of contravening subsection. See further Brown v DPP, 162 JP 333, The Times 26 March 1998, DC; the words "or included in a relevant programme" were substituted by section 203 of, paragraph 26 of Schedule 20 to, the Broadcasting Act 1990. Paragraph was inserted after paragraph by paragraph 34 of Schedule 5 to the Cable and Broadcasting Act 1984. A new paragraph was substituted for paragraphs and by section 203 of, paragraph 26 of Schedule 20 to, the Broadcasting Act 1990.. The reference to level 5 on the standard scale was su

Dunton Hot Springs, Colorado

Dunton Hot Springs known as Dunton, Colorado, is a tiny huddle of log buildings that sits at 8,600 feet on the West Fork of the Dolores River in the San Juan Mountains in the Southwest corner of Colorado. Dunton is 35 miles above Cortez, 25 miles miles southwest of Telluride. Dunton was part of a 260-acre homestead landed by Joe Roscio in the 1880s. Roscio came west from Minnesota to make his fortune in Colorado mining, although he never struck it rich, he was successful. At the time Roscio started mining on the West Fork federal troops were kept busy "clearing" the area of resentful Ute Indians, hunting the area for centuries; the Smuggler Mine which Roscio started was a tipple style mine operation built on a steep slope on the shady side of the river. Roscio and his wife had four children, the male children went to work in the mine while they were adolescents, a common practice at the time; the boys were named Joe and Emilio. Given the feast-or-famine nature of mining, the family survived by trapping and logging and the young men learned at a young age they could make a living off the other miners by building and renting cabins, operating a bar and lodge, by charging a nickel to use the hot springs.

The three brothers changed Dunton's name to Rancho Dolores and it was tremendously popular with families from the Four Corners region for 50 years. The first hot tub was formed by digging a pit 14 feet × 20 feet, lining it with logs, diverting the hot water source into it; the mineral content of the water was so high it shortly formed a smooth, copper-colored, mineralized coat evenly over the logs. Except for a short time in the 1930s, Dunton had no telephone service, a line, run from Rico over the mountain proved impossible to maintain in winter. To the chagrin of the women and the pleasure of the men, the phone line was abandoned. Radio signals were impossible to catch in the narrow valley, television was never viewed at Dunton until the most recent incarnation of owners took over in the mid 1990s; the Roscios sold Dunton and its land in 1974 to a group of investors from Telluride and the East Coast. Dunton was a melting pot of local sheepherders, valley ranchers, reservation workers and hippies making their way from Berkeley to Boulder.

Traditional customers gave way to the new style of customer who enjoyed the hot springs and nude volleyball games in the rarefied air. In the 1990s, a group of German investors rumored to be affiliated with the Henkel family radically transformed Dunton from a bohemian way station with humble amenities to an exclusive resort marketed as "The #7 Luxury Hotel in the U. S." In the 1970s the old cabins were rented for $5.00 to $25.00 a night. Cabins in the new settlement now rent for over a thousand dollars a night. Http://www.duntonhotsprings.com/

Dobro

Dobro is an American brand of resonator guitars owned by Gibson and manufactured by its subsidiary Epiphone. The term "dobro" is used as a generic trademark for any wood-bodied, single-cone resonator guitar; the Dobro was a guitar manufacturing company founded by the Dopyera brothers with the name "Dobro Manufacturing Company". Their guitars designs, with a single outward-facing resonator cone, was introduced to compete with the patented inward-facing tricone and biscuit designs produced by the National String Instrument Corporation; the Dobro name appeared on other instruments, notably electric lap steel guitars and solid body electric guitars and on other resonator instruments such as Safari resonator mandolins. The roots of Dobro story can be traced to the 1920s when Slovak immigrant and instrument repairman/inventor John Dopyera and musician George Beauchamp were searching for more volume for his guitars. Dopyera built an ampliphonic for Beauchamp, patented in December 1929. In mid-1929, Dopyera left the National company to start the "Dobro Manufacturing Company" along with his brothers Rudy and Ed, Vic Smith.

National continued operating under Barth et al.. Dobro is a word meaning ` good' in their native Slovak. An early company motto was "Dobro means good in any language." In 1930, the Dobro company name was changed to the "Dobro Corporation, Ltd.", with additional capital provided by Louis and Robert Dopyera. Dobro was, during this period, a competitor of National; the Dobro was the third resonator guitar design by John Dopyera, the inventor of the resonator guitar, but the second to enter production. Unlike his earlier tricone design, which had three ganged inward-facing resonator cones, the Dobro had a single outward-facing cone, with its concave surface facing up; the Dobro company described this as a bowl shaped resonator. The Dobro was cheaper to produce. In Dopyera's opinion, the cost of manufacture had priced the resonator guitar beyond the reach of many players, his failure to convince his fellow directors at the National String Instrument Corporation to produce a single-cone version was a motivating factor for leaving.

Since National had applied for a patent on an inward-facing single cone, Dopyera developed a design that reversed its direction: Rather than having the guitar’s bridge rest on the apex of the cone as the National design did, it rested on an eight legged cast aluminum spider sitting on the perimeter of the cone. In the following years both Dobro and National built a wide variety of metal- and wood-bodied single-cone guitars, while National continued with the Tricone for a time. Both companies sourced many components from National director Adolph Rickenbacher, John Dopyera remained a major shareholder in National. By 1932 the Dopyera brothers had gained control of both National and Dobro, which they merged to form the "National-Dobro Company". By the 1940s, National-Dobro had been purchased by Valco. Valco ceased production of Dobro-branded guitars after World War II. In 1964, the Dopyera brothers revived the Dobro brand name, they sold the name to Semie Moseley in 1966. In 1970, the Dopyeras' Original Musical Instrument Company yet again reacquired the Dobro name.

The Gibson Guitar Corporation acquired OMI in 1993, along with the Dobro name. The company became Gibson's Original Acoustic Instruments division, production was moved to Nashville in 2000. Dobros are manufactured by Gibson subsidiary Epiphone; the Dobro was first introduced to country music by Roy Acuff. The first and second prototypes of the Dobro created by the brothers reside at the invention’s birthplace of Taft, California, in a museum about the town’s oil production history; the term "dobro" is used as a form of generic trademark to describe resonator guitars. Gibson, owns the registered trademark Dobro, uses it for its own product line. Current and past models resonator guitars manufactured by the Gibson Company are: Hound Dog Round neck Deluxe round neck Deluxe square neck M-14 metal body Gibson's Phil Leadbetter resonator series History of the Pre-War Dobro by Randy Getz Dobro Birthplace

Milan KaĊĦanin

Milan Kašanin was a Serbian art historian, art critic and writer. He served as the head of three Belgrade based museums, the Museum of Prince Pavle, the Museum of Contemporary Art and the Gallery of Frescoes. Of humble origins, Kašanin adopted his mother's surname. Granted a scholarship, he studied art history at the Sorbonne. With the dissertation Bela crkva Karanska, Kašanin obtained his PhD from the University of Belgrade in 1926, he was curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art, director of the Museum of Prince Pavle and the Gallery of Frescoes in Belgrade. He is known as one of the organizers of some of the first major European art exhibitions in Belgrade, The Italian Portrait Through the Ages, in 1938, French Painting of the 19th Century one year later. Apart from organizing foreign exhibitions in Yugoslavia, he organized exhibits of Serbian frescoes and other art in many European capitals, as well as in South America. Kašanin was the founder and editor of the magazine Umetnički pregled, published between 1937 and 1941.

He served as the head of the Museum of Prince Pavle between 1935 and 1944. In order to compile the art collection of the Museum of Prince Pavle, Kašanin traveled through Europe and stayed in the Netherlands, among other places, his travel reports, first published in newspapers and also in the anthology Pronađeni predmeti, are a testimony to this. The organization of the exhibitions of both Yugoslav art in Amsterdam and Dutch art in Belgrade is attributed to Kašanin; as part of his scientific work, he researches Serbian art from the Middle Ages to the modern era. His interpretations are based on insights gained by the French research school of the interwar period and are written in a refined style and with a thorough analysis, it brought him into the company of Serbian artists and collectors such as Milan Konjović and Pavle Beljanski respectively. Kašanin made a significant contribution to the knowledge of Serbian medieval literature, he began publishing art criticism in 1924 and was published in magazines such as Politika, Vreme and in the magazine Reč i slika.

In 1927, he co-authored a book with Veljko Petrović on the contribution of Serbian artists to the visual arts in Vojvodina. He was noted for his fierce literary criticism. After World War II, Kašanin fell out of favor with Yugoslavia's new communist government because of his former close ties with Prince Pavle, struggled to get a job and publish his books. Kašanin had three sons and a daughter, his brother Radivoje was an accomplished mathematician and academic, while some of his friends included the fellow art historian Kenneth Clark, Serbian writers such as Isidora Sekulić, Anica Savić Rebac, Ivo Andrić. His collected works were published in 2002 with a total of eight volumes. Kašanin was a recipient of the Order of St Sava, the Order of the Yugoslav Crown, the French Legion of Honour, the Order of Orange-Nassau, the Danish Order, the Order of Polonia Restituta, an Italian order. A street in Belgrade is named after him. Milan Konjović Pavle Beljanski Isidora Sekulić Svetozar Radojčić Vladimir Petković