SUMMARY / RELATED TOPICS

Law enforcement

Law enforcement is any system by which some members of government act in an organized manner to enforce the law by discovering, rehabilitating, or punishing people who violate the rules and norms governing that society. Although the term encompasses entities such as courts and corrections, it is most applied to those who directly engage in patrols or surveillance to dissuade and discover criminal activity, those who investigate crimes and apprehend offenders, a task carried out by the police, sheriff or another law enforcement organization. Although law enforcement may be most concerned with the prevention and punishment of crimes, organizations exist to discourage a wide variety of non-criminal violations of rules and norms, effected through the imposition of less severe consequences. There are different units in different police departments, including “Undercover”, “Detective”, “CID”, “Gang Task Force”, “Drug Task Force”, "Custody Enforcement", this varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

Most law enforcement is conducted by some type of law enforcement agency, with the most typical agency fulfilling this role being the police. Social investment in enforcement through such organizations can be massive, both in terms of the resources invested in the activity, in the number of people professionally engaged to perform those functions. Law enforcement agencies tend to be limited to operating within a specified jurisdiction. In some cases, jurisdiction may overlap in between organizations. Various specialized segments of society may have their own internal law enforcement arrangements. For example, military organizations may have military police. Outline of law enforcement – structured list of topics related to law enforcement, organized by subject area Law enforcement by country Vigilantism Criminal law Superhero

Reginald Brade

Sir Reginald Herbert Brade was a British civil servant. Brade was educated at Bradfield College in the small village of Bradfield in Berkshire, he entered the War Office as Clerk of the Higher Division of the Civil Service in 1884. He was a Private Secretary between 1892 and 1896, first to Lord Sandhurst and Lord Monkswell when they were Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for War, to Joseph Powell Williams when he was Financial Secretary to the War Office. Between 1901 and 1914, Brade was a Secretary of the Army Council and Assistant Secretary of the War Office, he was the Permanent Under-Secretary of State for War from 1914 to 1920. He was Secretary and Registrar of the Distinguished Service Order in 1906 and during his career Gentleman Usher to the Sword of State. Order of the Bath Knight Grand Cross Knight Commander (KCB, 1914 Companion King George V Coronation Medal Knight of the Legion of Honour Knight of the Order of the Crown Brade, Sir Reginald Herbert Knight Civil Servant - website of the National Register of Archives The Next of Kin Memorial Plaque - website of The Imperial War Museum Who was Who: 1934 UK Census 1881.

National Archives.

Morris Ouma

Maurice Amollo Ouma is a Kenyan cricketer and a former limited over captain. He is a right-handed batsman and plays as a wicket-keeper, he has played for the Kenyan cricket team since 2000. Ouma represented Kenya in the Under-19 World Cups of both 2000 and 2002, while maintaining his position at the top of the middle-order, he made his next step up at the ICC Six Nations Challenge, in which Kenya came out victorious in the final in Windhoek. He played in the 2003 edition of the Sharjah Cup. Around this period, he was described by Hossain Ayob, the African development manager for the ICC, as a star in the making. Ouma was on the losing Kenyan side in the 2005 ICC Intercontinental Cup final, who stumbled in the second innings despite first-innings centuries from Steve Tikolo and Hitesh Modi. Most Ouma participated in a three-game ODI series against Bangladesh in August 2006. Ouma has progressively made his way up from being a lower-middle order batsman to an opening batsman strong against smaller nations such as the young Bangladesh squad.

Morris Ouma at CricketArchive Morris Ouma at ESPNcricinfo