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I My Mie

"I MY MIE" is the debut album of Japanese singer MIE. The album was released on August 21, 1981, less than five months after the dissolution of her group Pink Lady, it was reissued on October 24, 2007 with one bonus track. All lyrics by Yoko Aki, music except where indicated. Side A"Maihime TONIGHT" "Kare to Watashi to On'na Tomodachi" "Tahiti Mediterranean Club" "Don't Call Me, Mr. X" "Sekaijū no.... Ni Kataomoi" Side B"Animal House" "Brahms Loves Rock" "I MY MIE" "Shinju Dorobō" "Today's My Birthday" "After Five Friday" "Bōeki Fū" 2007 CD bonus track"More More" Official website

Ministry of Labour Staff Association

The Ministry of Labour Staff Association was a trade union representing civil servants working in the British Ministry of Labour. The union was founded in 1912 as the National Federation of Employment Department Clerks, bringing together five autonomous regional unions of clerks in the newly-established labour exchanges; the union grew, admitting women from 1914, temporary staff as associate members from 1918. That year, the regional unions amalgamated and the federation became the Employment Department Clerks' Association. Despite the amalgamation, the union failed to grow further because temporary staff were not willing to join a union which would permit them only associate status. In an attempt to reinvigorate itself, the union became the "Ministry of Labour Staff Association" in 1924 and, for the first time, appointed a full-time general secretary, Reginald Crook. Temporary staff were permitted full membership, typists and third class officers were permitted to join; the union spent much of its time campaigning for increases in wages, but this only succeeded in 1947, when Ministry of Labour clerks were placed on general civil service pay scales.

In 1939, the union was a founder of the Civil Service Alliance, in 1943 a founder of the Federation of Ministry of Labour Staffs. It joined the Trades Union Congress in 1948. Membership of the union was over 17,000 by 1973, when it merged into the Civil and Public Services Association. 1924: Reginald Crook 1951: Emrys Thomas 1960: John L. Tindall