Museum of Richmond

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Museum of Richmond
Museum of Richmond logo.jpg
Established 1988; 30 years ago (1988)
Location Old Town Hall, Whittaker Avenue, Richmond, London
Type History museum
Founder John Cloake
Chair Hilda Clarke
Curator Rebecca Arnott
Public transit access National Rail London Underground London Overground Richmond
Website www.museumofrichmond.com
Old Town Hall, Richmond, London
Window glass fragment from Richmond Palace, in the museum's permanent display
One of the museum's highlights: The Terrace and View from Richmond Hill, Surrey by Leonard Knyff

The Museum of Richmond in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames is located in Richmond's Old Town Hall,[1] close to Richmond Bridge.[2] It was formally opened by Queen Elizabeth II on 28 October 1988.[3]

An independent museum and a registered charity,[nb 1] it is supported by Richmond upon Thames Borough Council. Hilda Clarke chairs the board of trustees; John Lee, Baron Lee of Trafford is deputy chair.[4] The curator and executive officer (since June 2017) is Rebecca Arnott.[4]

The museum's displays, from medieval times to the present day, relate to the history of Richmond, Kew, Petersham and Ham which, until local government boundary changes in 1965, formed the Municipal Borough of Richmond (Surrey). Its rotating exhibitions,[5] education activities and resources,[6] and a programme of events (including events for families and children)[7][8][9] cover the whole of the modern borough. The museum's highlights include: 16th-century glass from Richmond Palace; a model of Richmond Palace;[10] and a painting, The Terrace and View from Richmond Hill, Surrey by Dutch draughtsman and painter Leonard Knyff (1650–1722), which is part of the Richmond upon Thames Borough Art Collection.[11]

The museum publishes a quarterly newsletter[12] and organises a programme of talks.[7][13] Admission to the museum, which is open from Tuesdays to Saturdays, is free.[14]

History[edit]

The museum was created in 1983 by local residents[15] led by local historian John Cloake (who was the museum's first chairman).[16][17][18][19] Its first permanent curator (from 1989 to 2003) was Simon Lace.[20]

Exhibitions[edit]

The museum's current exhibition, from 5 May to October 2018, is Archaeology: Richmond's Prehistory. It will be followed, in October 2018, by an exhibition commemorating the museum's 30th anniversary.[21]

The museum's previous exhibitions include:

  • 2017 (23 September) – 2018 (21 April) Poverty[22]
  • 2017 (6 May – 16 September) Old Palace Lane: Medieval to Modern Richmond
  • 2016 (5 November) – 2017 (29 April) The Royal Star & Garter: 100 Years of Care, marking the centenary of the founding, in Richmond, of the first Star and Garter Home
  • 2015 (15 September) – 2016 (28 February) The Battle of Britain 75 years on – Richmond and the Second World War[23]
  • 2014 (8 August) – 2015 (22 April) 1914–1918 Richmond at Home and at War: Local stories and their international links, Richmond's experience of the First World War[24][25]
  • 2014 (30 January – 26 July) Encountering the Unchartered and back – Three explorers: Ball, Vancouver and Burton,[19] telling the story of explorers Henry Lidgbird Ball, George Vancouver and Richard Burton and their connections with Richmond[26]
  • 2013 (20 March – 2 November) Living and Dying in 19th Century Richmond, exploring the lives of some of Richmond’s 19th-century residents[2][27][28]
  • 2012 (19 December) – 2013 (2 March) The Building of a Borough, showcasing building plans held in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames’ Local Studies Collection[29]
  • 2012 (11 July – 24 November) Royal Minstrels to Rock and Roll: 500 years of music-making in Richmond[30][31]
  • 2012 (4 February – 23 June) Happy and Glorious: popular Royal celebration and commemoration in Richmond[32]
  • 2010 (18 September) – 2011 (26 February) Richmond Theatre: Through the Stages[23][33]
  • 2010 (1 May – 4 September) How the Vote Was Won: Art, Theatre and Women's Suffrage[34]
  • 2009 (October)  – 2010 (17 April) Richmond – From Page to Screen[35]
  • 2009 (February - August) From Henry VII to Henry VIII, marking the 500th anniversary of the death of Henry VII at Richmond Palace and the accession to the throne of his son Henry VIII[36]
  • 2007 (16 May – 17 November) The Two Richmonds – A Celebration of their Twinning, marking the 400th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown and the twinning relationship of Richmond, Surrey and Richmond, Virginia[37]
  • 2007 (23 April – 29 July) Trading in Human Lives: The Richmond Connection, on Richmond and the slave trade[38][39]
  • 2006 (25 October) – 2007 (17 March) Men Remade: Paul Drury’s War in Richmond,[23] featuring the work of the 20th-century artist and printmaker Paul Drury
  • 2006 (5 April – 7 October) A Rich Heritage, featuring items from the borough's Local Studies Collection[5]
  • 2005 (28 September) – 2006 (18 March) Turner-Upon-Thames, focusing on the period when the artist J M W Turner lived in Isleworth and in Twickenham[23]
  • 2004 (17 November) – 2005 (26 March) Britflicks-on-Thames: Film Studios of the Borough and Beyond[40]
  • 2004 (14 January – 24 April) The Sensational Miss Braddon, about the author Mary Braddon who lived and died in Richmond[41][42]
  • 2003 (5 August – 28 September) Without Exception, a selection of original prints by Thomas Rowlandson of "The English Dance of Death" (1815–1816)[43]
  • 2003 (February – July) The Virgin Queen in Richmond, marking the 400th anniversary of the death, at Richmond Palace, of Elizabeth I[44]
  • 2002 (9 July – 29 September) The Fight To Save The View, marking the 100th anniversary of the Richmond, Petersham and Ham Open Spaces Act which has protected the view from Richmond Hill
  • 2002 (February – 30 June) Stage by Stage: Richmond's Theatrical Heritage[45]
  • 2001 – 2002 (26 January) Richmond's River: Pictures of and inspired by the Thames in Richmond[46]
  • 1998 (10 November) – 1999 (13 March) Arthur Hughes: The Last Pre-Raphaelite,[23][47] about the Pre-Raphaelite artist Arthur Hughes, who died at his house on Kew Green in 1915 and is buried in Richmond Cemetery[48]
  • 1997 – 1998 (14 March) Richmond Women Face to Face, famous women who lived in Richmond[49]
  • 1996 (10 September) – 1997 (25 January) Spencer Gore in Richmond, about the artist Spencer Gore who lived in Richmond and died there in 1914[50][51]
The Poppy Factory's headquarters in Richmond
Self-portrait of Spencer Gore
  • 1994 (1 November) – 1995 (28 January) The Factory of Remembrance: The Poppy & the Royal British Legion Poppy Factory[23]
  • 1993 (12 October) – 1994 (19 February) Prospects about Richmond: mid-eighteenth century drawings and prints by Augustin Heckel[52]
  • 1991 (6 August – 27 October) The Richmond Royal Horse Show,[53] an event held regularly in Richmond from 1892 to 1967[54]
  • 1989 Pissarro in Richmond, about Camille Pissarro and other artistic members of his family who lived in Kew and Richmond[55]

Publications[edit]

The museum's publications include:

  • Robinson, Derek and Fowler, Simon (2017) Old Palace Lane: Medieval to Modern Richmond, 44pp. Published jointly with the Richmond Local History Society. ISBN 978-0955071799
  • Boyes, Valerie (ed.) (2014) Encountering the Uncharted and Back – three explorers: Ball, Vancouver and Burton, 24pp.
  • Boyes, Valerie (with contributions from Govett, John) (2013) Living and Dying in 19th Century Richmond, 25pp.
  • Boyes, Valerie (with contributions from Cloake, John and Paytress, Mark) (2012) Royal Minstrels to Rock and Roll: 500 years of music-making in Richmond, 28pp.
  • Boyes, Valerie (ed.) (2009) Richmond on Page and Screen, 36pp.
  • Moses, John; Cloake, John (2007) The Two Richmonds: a celebration of their twinning, the American connection, 14pp. OCLC 143627273[56]
  • Boyes, Valerie (2007) Trading in Human Lives: The Richmond Connection, 28pp.
  • Moses, John (2005) Turner-upon-Thames, 13pp.
  • Roberts, Leonard and Wildman, Stephen (1999) Arthur Hughes: The Last Pre-Raphaelite, 48pp. ISBN 978-1851493173
  • Gore, Frederick (1996) Spencer Gore in Richmond: an exhibition at the Museum of Richmond 10 September 1996 to 25 January 1997, 44pp. ISBN 0951854917[57]
  • Museum of Richmond (1994) Simplest Country Gentlefolk: Royal Family at Kew, 1727–1841, 36pp. ISBN 978-0951854914
  • Jeffrie, Richard (1991) Mr Rowlandson's Richmond: Thomas Rowlandson's Drawings of Richmond-upon-Thames, 89pp. ISBN 0951854909

Patrons[edit]

HRH Princess Alexandra is Royal Patron of the museum.[58][59][60] Its other patrons are broadcaster and naturalist Sir David Attenborough,[58][61] Richmond hotelier Greville Dare,[3][58] actor, novelist, screenwriter and film director Julian Fellowes (Baron Fellowes of West Stafford),[58][62] TV presenter and author Bamber Gascoigne,[16][58][63] Lady Annabel Goldsmith,[58] broadcaster Andrew Marr[58] and broadcaster, writer and politician Lord Watson of Richmond.[3][58][64]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ It is registered with the Charity Commission for England and Wales as charity number 295164.
    "The Museum of Richmond". Charity profile. Charities Aid Foundation. Retrieved 3 September 2013. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Old Town Hall". London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Gooch, Tracey (11 April 2013). "Museum Review – Museum of Richmond upon Thames". Please don't touch the dinosaurs. Free entry. Retrieved 22 July 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c "The History of the Founding of the Museum of Richmond". Museum of Richmond. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Staff and trustees". Museum of Richmond. January 2018. Retrieved 26 January 2018. 
  5. ^ a b Farquharson, Hannah (7 April 2006). "Elizabeth I letter among museum gems". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 1 November 2012. 
  6. ^ "Richmond at Home and at War" (PDF). Museum of Richmond. 2014. Retrieved 28 February 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Dyduch, Amy (9 February 2014). "Month of fun lined up at Richmond Museum". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 20 March 2015. 
  8. ^ Dyduch, Amy (20 November 2013). "Museum of Richmond marks 25th anniversary". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 20 March 2015. 
  9. ^ Odling, George (26 June 2014). "Richmond meets the Romans during Festival of British Archaeology". Wimbledon Guardian. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  10. ^ Oldham, Lucy (10 September 2004). "Making sure the past has a future". Lancashire Telegraph. Retrieved 6 December 2014. 
  11. ^ "The Terrace and View from Richmond Hill, Surrey". Art UK. Retrieved 2 December 2016. 
  12. ^ "New Exhibition" (PDF). Museum of Richmond Newsletter. January–April 2016. 
  13. ^ Proto, Laura (7 March 2015). "New book and talk detail lives of 18th century Richmond family". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 20 March 2015. 
  14. ^ "Museum of Richmond: Visitor Information". Visit London. London & Partners. Retrieved 9 February 2016. 
  15. ^ "Richmond Museum". Destination Richmond. 2010. Retrieved 1 November 2012. 
  16. ^ a b Mason, Jennifer (October 2013). "Five minutes with... Bamber Gascoigne". Residents' Journal (6): 21. 
  17. ^ Bell, Sarah (9 January 2004). "Profile: Local historian John Cloake". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 17 July 2014. 
  18. ^ Dyduch, Amy (18 July 2014). "Museum of Richmond founder John Cloake has died, aged 89". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  19. ^ a b Mason, Jennifer (January 2014). "A snapshot of history". Residents' Journal (RWPB) (9): 24–25. 
  20. ^ Lace, Simon; Moses, John M (30 January 2003). "Museum curator bids farewell to Richmond". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 22 February 2016. 
  21. ^ "Exhibitions". Museum of Richmond. Retrieved 14 April 2018. 
  22. ^ "Poverty exhibition". Arts Richmond. September 2017. Retrieved 22 April 2018. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f "Past Exhibitions". Museum of Richmond. Retrieved 18 January 2018. 
  24. ^ Dyduch, Amy (7 August 2014). "Museum of Richmond launches World War One exhibition". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  25. ^ Proto, Laura (20 August 2014). "World War I exhibition comes together, thanks to sterling work of community". Richmond Guardian. Retrieved 21 July 2015. 
  26. ^ "Programme of Films, Talks and Events January – April 2014" (PDF). Museum of Richmond. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  27. ^ "Living and Dying in 19th Century Richmond". The Barnes Magazine. 22 February 2013. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  28. ^ "Living and Dying in 19th Century Richmond". Exhibition. Museum of Richmond. 2013. Retrieved 14 February 2015. 
  29. ^ "Building of a borough – update". My Sheen Village. 2012. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  30. ^ "Royal Minstrels to Rock and Roll". The Barnes Magazine. 3 August 2012. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  31. ^ "Royal Minstrels to Rock and Roll: 500 years of Music-Making in Richmond". Time Out London. 20 June 2012. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  32. ^ "Exhibition News: Happy and Glorious: popular Royal celebration and commemoration in Richmond 4 February – 23 June 2012" (PDF). The Herald. Museum of Richmond: 4. January–April 2012. 
  33. ^ "Loans to National and Local Museums" (PDF). Newsletter. White Lodge Museum and Ballet Resource Centre (2). Autumn 2010. Retrieved 12 March 2015. 
  34. ^ "How the Vote Was Won". www.thesuffragettes.org. 2010. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  35. ^ Gore, Will (2 October 2009). "Richmond is a literary inspiration". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 25 September 2014. 
  36. ^ "Exhibitions" (PDF). Funding our future in the 21st century. Museum of Richmond. 2009. Retrieved 29 February 2016. 
  37. ^ Newstead, Sarah (27 May 2007). "Richmond celebrates with its own twin town". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  38. ^ Guthrie, Babs (3 May 2007). "Stories Of Slave Trade Richmond". Painting and Drawing. Culture24. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  39. ^ Taylor, Helen (12 July 2007). "Richmond's role explained". Richmond and Twickenham Times. Retrieved 21 July 2015. 
  40. ^ "Britflicks-on-Thames". News. Film London. 27 December 2004. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  41. ^ "Museum looks into life of sensational author". Richmond and Twickenham Times. 9 January 2004. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  42. ^ "Mary Elizabeth Braddon: a 19th Century Richmond Author with a 21st Century Life" (Press release). Sensation Press. January 2004. Retrieved 23 January 2016. 
  43. ^ "Drawing on characters of Regency times". Richmond and Twickenham Times. 15 August 2003. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  44. ^ "Diary of Engagements of Princess Alexandra". Engagements. The British Monarchy. 5 February 2003. Retrieved 20 January 2015. 
  45. ^ "Exhibitions". Richmond and Twickenham Times. 26 April 2002. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  46. ^ "Exhibitions". Richmond and Twickenham Times. 21 December 2001. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  47. ^ "Successful art show nears end". Richmond and Twickenham Times. 20 February 2009. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  48. ^ "People of historical note buried in the borough A to L". London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. Retrieved 18 January 2018. 
  49. ^ "Abigail moving down to Hove". Richmond and Twickenham Times. 17 January 1998. Retrieved 8 January 2017. 
  50. ^ Upstone, Robert (May 2009). "Spencer Gore Richmond Park c.1914". The Camden Town Group in Context. Tate Gallery. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  51. ^ "Spencer Gore in Richmond". Exhibitions. British Council. 1996. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  52. ^ "'Prospects about Richmond'". Yale University. Retrieved 27 June 2017. 
  53. ^ Houghton, Joy (1991). The Richmond Royal Horse Show: Reflections of a Devotee. Museum of Richmond. 
  54. ^ Roberts, Val (May 2007). "Richmond Royal Horse Show". Richmond History: Journal of the Richmond Local History Society. 28: 51–63. 
  55. ^ Clement, Russell T.; Houzé, Annick (1999). Neo-impressionist Painters: A Sourcebook on Georges Seurat, Camille Pissarro ... Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. p. 219. ISBN 0-313-30382-7. 
  56. ^ "The two Richmonds: a celebration of their twinning, the American connection". WorldCat. Retrieved 4 December 2014. 
  57. ^ "Spencer Gore in Richmond". Yale Center for British Art. Retrieved 7 February 2015. 
  58. ^ a b c d e f g h "Governance". Museum of Richmond. September 2016. Retrieved 28 May 2017. 
  59. ^ "Princess agrees to be patron of museum". Richmond Guardian. 4 April 2003. Retrieved 11 February 2016. 
  60. ^ "HRH Princess Alexandra enjoys a visit to the Museum of Richmond" (PDF) (Press release). Museum of Richmond. 29 July 2015. Retrieved 17 September 2014. 
  61. ^ "Art-Deco Richmond". The Barnes Magazine. 8 April 2013. Retrieved 14 May 2018. 
  62. ^ "New patron for the Museum". Museum of Richmond Newsletter. May 2015. 
  63. ^ "Living and Dying in 19th Century Richmond". The Richmond Magazine. 22 February 2013. Retrieved 3 September 2013. 
  64. ^ "Lord Watson of Richmond". Lords. Parliament of the United Kingdom. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 51°27′32″N 0°18′24″W / 51.45884°N 0.30653°W / 51.45884; -0.30653