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Nauvoo, Illinois

Nauvoo is a small city in Hancock County, United States, on the Mississippi River near Fort Madison, Iowa. The population of Nauvoo was 1,149 at the 2010 census. Nauvoo attracts visitors for its historic importance and its religious significance to members of several groups: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; the city and its immediate surrounding area are listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Nauvoo Historic District. The area of Nauvoo was first called Quashquema, named in honor of the Native American chief who headed a Sauk and Fox settlement numbering nearly 500 lodges. By 1827, white settlers had built cabins in the area. By 1829 this area of Hancock County had grown sufficiently so that a post office was needed and in 1832 the town, now called Venus, was one of the contenders for the new county seat. However, the honor was awarded to Carthage. In 1834 the name Venus was changed to Commerce because the settlers felt the new name better suited their plans.

In late 1839, arriving Latter Day Saints bought the small town of Commerce and in April 1840 it was renamed Nauvoo by Joseph Smith, who led the Latter Day Saints to Nauvoo to escape conflict with the state government in Missouri. The name Nauvoo is derived from the traditional Hebrew language with an anglicized spelling; the word comes from Isaiah 52:7, “How beautiful upon the mountains...” It is notable that “by 1844 Nauvoo's population had swollen to 12,000, rivaling the size of Chicago” at the time. After Joseph Smith's death in 1844, continued violence from surrounding non-Mormons forced most Latter-Day Saints to leave Nauvoo. Most of these followers, led by Brigham Young, emigrated to the Great Salt Lake Valley. In 1849, Icarians moved to the Nauvoo area to implement a utopian socialist commune based on the ideals of French philosopher Étienne Cabet; the colony had over 500 members at its peak, but Cabet's death in 1856 led some members to leave this parent colony. In the early and mid 20th century Nauvoo was a Roman Catholic town, a plurality of the population today is Methodist or another Christian faith.

On the city's higher ground are the temple, residential areas, the business district along Mulholland Street, much of it devoted to the needs of tourists and those interested in Latter Day Saint history. The flatlands are occupied by a small number of 19th-century brick houses and other buildings that have survived the city's vicissitudes, with large empty spaces between them where houses and whole neighborhoods have disappeared. Community of Christ owns much of the southern end of the flatlands and maintains several key historic sites in and around Nauvoo, including the Joseph Smith Homestead, the Nauvoo House, the Red Brick Store, the Mansion House, the Smith Family Cemetery. Guided tours are available at the church's Joseph Smith Historic Site, at the south end of the town and accessible from Highway 96; the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints owns most of the other historic sites in Nauvoo, including the homes of Brigham Young, Heber C. Kimball, other early members of the church, as well as other significant buildings.

Most of these sites are open to the public, with demonstrations and displays, there are self-guided driving tours as well as wagon tours. These tours are free, as are the riverside theatrical productions. There is a large visitors' center complete with a relief map of 1846 Nauvoo; the creation of Nauvoo as a historical tourism destination was a result of the work of J. LeRoy Kimball. Kimball was a descendant of early Mormon leader Heber C. Kimball, bought his ancestor's home in 1954 with the intention of restoring it, he was the president of Nauvoo Restoration, Inc. from 1962 to 1986. An LDS Church congregation was established in Nauvoo in 1956, from its inception consisting of elderly LDS couples serving as missionaries and historical guides; the City of Joseph Pageant, an outdoor musical produced by the LDS Church, began to run each summer in 1976. A stake was organized with headquarters at Nauvoo in 1979. In addition to the many homes, restored, the Relief Society Memorial Garden was dedicated in 1978, featuring statues designed by Dennis Smith and Florence Hansen.

In June 2002, the LDS Church completed construction of a new temple on the site of the original temple. The exterior, much of the interior, is a copy of the original; the exterior matches the original except in three ways: The temple was positioned 12.5 feet south to allow for parking on the north side, there are two new exterior doors and there is a standing Angel Moroni as is seen on most modern temples. The rebuilding of the Nauvoo Temple was an occasion of great joy and enthusiasm for members of the LDS Church. During the public open house prior to its dedication, 331,849 visitors toured the building. Following Church custom, the temple is now used only by Church members. In comparison to other towns in the area, Nauvoo has seen consistent population growth since the completion of the temple; the work to renovate various sites of historical significance in the area is coordinated by Nauvoo Restoration, Incorporated. NRI is a nonprofit organization supported by the LDS Church and Community of Christ, as well as others interest

Walsall Corporation Tramways

Walsall Corporation Tramways operated a tramway service in Walsall between 1904 and 1930. Faced with a takeover of the South Staffordshire Tramways Company by British Electric Traction, Walsall Corporation made their own agreement with the South Staffordshire Tramways company, on 1 January 1901, for the sum of £18,500, Walsall Corpopation became owners of the tramway system, they leased the tramway back to the former company. From 1901, contracts were awarded for the modernisation and extension of the system. On 3 December 1903, Lieutenant Colonel Sir Horatio Arthur Yorke carried out an inspection of the new extensions and passed them fit for service; the official opening ceremony took place on 31 December 1903, when the Mayor, the Council and Justices of the Peace were conveyed in four special cars, covering most of the routes of the new network. Fifty drivers and fifty conductors were employed to start the corporation services which began on 1 January 1904. In June 1905, an agreement was made with the Wolverhampton District Electric Company whereby Walsall Corporation tramcars would be allowed to work over their tracks into the Market Place at Willenhall.

A junction was constructed at the Willenhall Board Schools, Walsall tramcars first ran through to Willenhall Market Place on 19 July 1905.1 May 1907 through running to Wednesbury and Darlaston was begun. Reduced services were operated in the evenings in 1916 after the Zeppelin raids. In one of these raids by LZ 61 on 31 January 1916 tramcar 16 was on Bradford Street with the Mayoress, Mrs. Mary Julia Slater on board. In Bradford Place a bomb fell and the glass in the car was shattered; the Mayoress was injured and died from her injuries on 20 February. In 1920-21 the route from Pinfold to Bloxwich was doubled at a cost of £14,313. In 1922, the corporation took over responsibility for the lines from Pleck to Wood Green and James Bridge. 1-28 Brush Electrical Company 1903 £527 each. 29-32 United Electric Car Company 1908 33-39 United Electric Car Company 1912 40-49 Brush Electrical Company 1919 The first abandonment took place on 1 April 1928 when the route to Walsall Wood was converted to motor bus operation.

In 1928 the Wolverhampton District Company routes were sold to the Wolverhampton Corporation Tramways. The Birmingham Road route was abandoned on 30 September 1928, the Willenhall route on 4 February 1929; the routes to Darlaston and Wednesbury were abandoned on 5 March 1931. The last tram operated on 30 September 1933. On 1 October 1933 the Walsall trolleybus service opened to the public

Lupi, Camarines Sur

Lupi the Municipality of Lupi, is a 3rd class municipality in the province of Camarines Sur, Philippines. According to the 2015 census, it has a population of 32,167 people. Lupi, in the first district of the province, was branded as a "travelling poblacion" as it had been transferred several times when it was a small settlement during Spanish rule. On 17 October 1726, the Spanish government under the administration of Governor General Marquéz de Torrecampo, the titular head of the Diocese of Caceres, issued a decree making Lupi a separate town. Lupi is politically subdivided into 38 barangays. In the 2015 census, the population of Lupi, Camarines Sur, was 32,167 people, with a density of 160 inhabitants per square kilometre or 410 inhabitants per square mile. Philippine Standard Geographic Code Official Site of the Province of Camarines Sur Philippine Census Information