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Bruce McGonnigal

Joseph Bruce McGonnigal is a former American football tight end on the University of Virginia football team, was a starter at the position in 1989 and 1990. In 1989, he set an ACC record for receiving yards by a tight end in a single season, with 634. McGonnigal played high school football at Loyola High School where he helped the Dons end a long losing streak to archrival Calvert Hall in the annual Turkey Bowl game his senior year. MCGonnigal graduated in 1986. McGonnigal has become an integral part of football folklore at the University of Virginia, where many fans tell varying accounts of how McGonnigal was injured while searching for his girlfriend's dog, some time prior to the game against Georgia Tech in 1990. McGonnigal ruptured his spleen and received a concussion from the fall incurred during the nighttime search; the spleen injury sidelined him for the rest of the 1990 season. At the time of the accident, the Virginia Cavaliers football team was ranked #1 in both major polls. Without McGonnigal, the Cavaliers fell to eventual NCAA champion Georgia Tech, 41-38.

Late in the game, with the Cavaliers trailing 38-35, quarterback Shawn Moore threw what would've been a go-ahead touchdown pass to new starting tight end Aaron Mundy. Coach George Welsh elected to kick a tying field goal, but the Yellow Jackets drove for the winning field goal. Many University of Virginia football fans speculate that had McGonnigal never been injured, the Virginia Cavaliers might have gone on to win at least a share of the NCAA national championship. McGonnigal was drafted in 1991 by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 9th round, but ended up with the Cleveland Browns, where he saw little playing time and closed out his brief NFL career. McGonnigal took up a career in political campaign management after leaving the NFL

Hirtodrosophila

Hirtodrosophila is a genus of fruit flies from the family Drosophilidae. Hirtodrosophila was a subgenus of the genus Drosophila, it was raised to the status of genus by Grimaldi in 1990. The third antennal segment is large, with unusually long setae. Arista with one ventral branch, anterior reclinate orbital bristle fine. Ventral receptacle in the form of loops, folded flat against the ventral surface of the vagina. Worldwide, though most species are subtropical in distribution. Where known, all species are associated with fungi, the preferred larval food. There are 150 described species divided into ten species groups

The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters (TV series)

The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters is an American western television series based on Robert Lewis Taylor's 1958 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel of the same name. The series aired on ABC for one season, 1963-64, was produced by MGM Television; the series was aimed at young families. It was known for the breakthrough performances of the 12-year-old Kurt Russell in the title role and Charles Bronson as the second wagon master, Linc Murdock in the last thirteen episodes. Bronson began his role in the episode "The Day of the Toll Takers"; each episode begins with the title "The Day of..." Although it started out with an ensemble cast, which included Dan O'Herlihy in the role of Jaimie's father, Sardius "Doc" McPheeters, who yields to alcohol and gambling, by the end of the run it had been reduced to the characters of Jaimie and Linc. Donna Anderson played Jenny, a young pioneer woman who befriends Jaimie during the perilous journey westward. Mark Allen was cast in nineteen episodes as Matt Kissel, with Meg Wyllie in eighteen segments as Mrs. Kissel.

In nine episodes, real-life child barbershop quartet The Osmond Brothers portrayed the singing sons of the Kissel family, all with given names of books of the Old Testament, Alan Osmond as Micah Kissel, Merrill Osmond as Deuteronomy Kissel, Jay Osmond as Lamentations Kissel, Wayne Osmond as Leviticus Kissel. Michael Witney in fourteen episodes portrayed the first wagon master, Buck Coulter, with his last appearance in "The Day of the Pawnees, Part 2". Witney was replaced by Bronson in the next episode. Hedley Mattingly was cast eight times as Coe, James Westerfield appeared seven times as John Murrel. Other recurring roles were filled by Sandy Kenyon in five episodes as Shep Baggott, stuntman Paul Baxley four times as Tracey, Mike DeAnda in five assorted roles. Vernett Allen, III, was cast as Othello in nine episodes. Guthrie Thomas, the now veteran singer-songwriter, was included in the cast of character actors as a "double" for Kurt Russell when horses were involved. Thomas and Russell were only months apart in age and the T.

V. producers did not want Russell harmed because of insurance liabilities. Thomas had been raised on several ranches, one of, owned by the film actor, Francis Lederer, fulfilled the age and horse riding requirements of Russell's role as Jaimie McPheeters. Thomas was accustomed to the film business as several motion pictures, one being John Ford's Sergeant Rutledge, had been filmed at Lederer's Mission Stables, now an historical California landmark. Veteran western actor Slim Pickens, a close friend of Thomas' family, was responsible for his getting a screen test and subsequent roles; the program faced stiff competition on CBS at 7:30 Eastern on Sundays from My Favorite Martian and the first half of The Ed Sullivan Show. NBC aired Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color in the same time slot. After the series was canceled, Kurt Russell and Charles Bronson reprised their roles of Jaimie McPheeters and Linc Murdock in the 1964 theatrical movie called Guns of Diablo, an expanded color version of the series' final episode, "The Day of the Reckoning".

Russ Conway appeared in the film as "Doc" McPheeters. The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters on IMDb The Travels of Jaimie McPheeters at TV.com

Bulls Gap, Tennessee

Bulls Gap is a town in Hawkins County, United States. The population was 738 at the 2010 census, it is part of the Kingsport–Bristol –Bristol Metropolitan Statistical Area, a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – known as the "Tri-Cities" region. The downtown area is listed on the National Register of Historic Places as the Bulls Gap Historic District; the town was named for John Bull, who made his home in the gap of mountains. Bulls Gap is located at 36°15′33″N 83°4′46″W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 1.2 square miles, all of it land. As of the census of 2000, there were 714 people, 319 households, 210 families residing in the town; the population density was 570.6 people per square mile. There were 348 housing units at an average density of 278.1 per square mile. The racial makeup of the town was 99.02% White, 0.70% African American, 0.28% from two or more races. There were 319 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.8% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, 33.9% were non-families.

30.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.3% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.81. In the town, the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 28.4% from 45 to 64, 17.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 85.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 76.1 males. The median income for a household in the town was $25,074, the median income for a family was $28,917. Males had a median income of $29,306 versus $21,500 for females; the per capita income for the town was $14,822. About 23.9% of families and 22.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 31.9% of those under age 18 and 17.1% of those age 65 or over. Legendary country comedian Archie Campbell, who performed at the Grand Ole Opry and starred in the television show Hee Haw, was a native of Bulls Gap.

Campbell referred to the town in many of his classic comedy routines. His house has been preserved as a museum and tourist attraction, U. S. Route 11E through Bulls Gap was renamed "Archie Campbell Highway" following his death in 1987; every Labor Day weekend the town has an annual three-day celebration honoring Campbell with a car show and live music. New York Times best selling author Amy Greene grew up in the vicinity of Bulls Gap. In Cormac McCarthy's novel Child of God, Lester Ballard murders a young couple in their car, gets in the car, turns on the radio, listens to the radio host talk about an upcoming event at Bulls Gap School. Bulls Gap's dirt racetrack, Volunteer Speedway, is referenced in Peter Farris' novel Last Call for the Living. George Washington Harris' short story, "Sut Lovingood at Bull's Gap," is set in Bulls Gap. Bulls Gap is home to Volunteer Speedway, a dirt racetrack, billed as the "World's Fastest Dirt Track." Schools serving Bulls Gap are a part of the Hawkins County School System, they include: Bulls Gap School – Grades K-8 Cherokee Comprehensive High School – Grades 9-12 Bulls Gap has a post office, it is located on US Route 11E.

Bulls Gap has a zip code. It serves portions of Greene and Hamblen counties

Luverne Township, Rock County, Minnesota

Luverne Township is a township in Rock County, United States. The population was 493 at the 2000 census. Luverne Township was organized in 1871. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 32.7 square miles. As of the census of 2000, there were 493 people, 166 households, 152 families residing in the township; the population density was 15.1 people per square mile. There were 169 housing units at an average density of 5.2/sq mi. The racial makeup of the township was 99.19% White, 0.41% African American, 0.20% Asian, 0.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.41% of the population. There were 166 households out of which 41.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 86.7% were married couples living together, 3.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 8.4% were non-families. 6.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.2% had someone living alone, 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.97 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 24.3% from 45 to 64, 11.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 108.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 110.7 males. The median income for a household in the township was $45,000, the median income for a family was $44,167. Males had a median income of $29,688 versus $21,429 for females; the per capita income for the township was $16,270. About 5.1% of families and 6.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 11.3% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over. Luverne Township is located in Minnesota's 1st congressional district, represented by Mankato educator Tim Walz, a Democrat. At the state level, Luverne Township is located in Senate District 22, represented by Republican Doug Magnus, in House District 22A, represented by Republican Joe Schomacker