Notoungulata

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Notoungulata
Temporal range: Paleocene–Holocene
Toxodon.jpg
Toxodon platensis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Infraclass: Eutheria
(unranked) Mesaxonia
Superorder: Meridiungulata
Order: Notoungulata
Roth 1903
Suborders and Families

See text

Notoungulata is an extinct order of hoofed, sometimes heavy-bodied mammalian ungulates that inhabited South America during the Paleocene to the mid-Holocene, living from approximately 57 Ma to 5,000 years ago.[1][2]

Taxonomy[edit]

Due to the isolated nature of South America, many notoungulates evolved along convergent lines into forms that resembled mammals on other continents. Examples of this are Pachyrukhos, a notoungulate that evolved to fill the role of rabbits and hares, and Homalodotherium, which evolved to resemble chalicotheres. During the Pleistocene, Toxodon was the largest common notoungulate. Most of the group (Mixotoxodon, Piauhytherium and Toxodon being exceptions) became extinct after the landbridge between North and South America was formed, allowing North American ungulates to enter South America in the Great American Interchange and out-compete the native fauna.[citation needed]

This order is united with other South-American ungulates in the super-order Meridiungulata, the notoungulate and litoptern native ungulates of South America have been shown by studies of collagen and mitochondrial DNA sequences to be a sister group to the perissodactyls, making them true ungulates.[3][4][5] The estimated divergence date is 66 million years ago,[5] this conflicts with the results of some morphological analyses which favoured them as afrotherians. It is in line with some more recent morphological analyses which suggested they were basal euungulates. Panperissodactyla has been proposed as the name of an unranked clade to include perissodactyls and their extinct South American ungulate relatives.[3]

Cifelli has argued that Notioprogonia is paraphyletic, as it would include the ancestors of the remaining suborders. Similarly, Cifelli indicated that Typotheria would be paraphyletic if it excluded Hegetotheria and he advocated inclusion of Archaeohyracidae and Hegetotheriidae in Typotheria.[6]

Notoungulata were for many years taken to include the order Arctostylopida, whose fossils are found mainly in China. Recent studies, however, have concluded that Arctostylopida are more properly classified as gliriforms, and that the notoungulates were therefore never found outside South and Central America.[7]

Based on an analysis of 133 morphological characters in 50 notoungulate genera, Billet 2011 concluded that Homalodotheriidae, Leontiniidae, Toxodontidae, Interatheriidae, Mesotheriidae, and Hegetotheriidae are the only monophyletic families of notoungulates.

Notoungulata

Henricosbornia




Simpsonotus




Notostylops



Pyrotherium




Toxodontia



Pampahippus



Ryphodon





Thomashuxleya



Periphragnis






Pleurostylodon



Homalodotheriidae

Asmodeus



Homalodotherium



Leontiniidae

Colpodon



Ancylocoelus




Leontinia



Scarrittia





Eomorphippus



Eurygenium



Rhynchippus



Morphippus




Pascualihippus




Argyrohippus


Toxodontidae

Nesodon



Adinotherium




Ponanskytherium



Hoffstetterius



Toxodon









Typotheria

Colbertia



Oldfieldthomasia



Campanorco



Acropithecus



Ultrapithecus


Interatheriidae

Notopithecus




Federicoanaya



Protypotherium



Miocochilius




Archaeophylus




Plagiarthrus




Interatherium



Cochilius









Eohyrax




Pseudhyrax



Mesotheriidae


Plesiotypotherium



Mesotherium




Trachytherus




Archaeotypotherium



Archaeohyrax


Hegetotheriidae


Prohegetotherium



Hegetotherium





Prosotherium



Paedotherium











Orders and families[edit]

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

Notations[edit]

  • Billet, Guillaume (December 2011). "Phylogeny of the Notoungulata (Mammalia) based on cranial and dental characters". Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. 9 (4): 481–97. doi:10.1080/14772019.2010.528456. OCLC 740994816. 
  • Buckley, M. (2015-04-01). "Ancient collagen reveals evolutionary history of the endemic South American 'ungulates'". Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 282 (1806): 20142671–20142671. doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.2671. PMC 4426609Freely accessible. 
  • Carroll, Robert Lynn (1988). Vertebrate Paleontology and Evolution. New York: W.H. Freeman and Company. ISBN 9780716718222. OCLC 14967288. 
  • Cifelli, Richard L (1993). "The phylogeny of the native South American ungulates". In Szalay, F.S.; Novacek, M.J.; McKenna, M.C. Mammal phylogeny: Placentals. 2. New York: Springer-Verlag. pp. 195–216. ISBN 0-387-97853-4. OCLC 715426850. 
  • McKenna, M.C. (1975). "Toward a phylogenetic classification of the Mammalia". In Luckett, W.P.; Szalay, F.S. Phylogeny of the primates: a multidisciplinary approach (Proceedings of WennerGren Symposium no. 61, Burg Wartenstein, Austria, July 6–14, 1974). New York: Plenum. pp. 21–46. doi:10.1007/978-1-4684-2166-8_2. ISBN 978-1-4684-2168-2. OCLC 1693999. 
  • McKenna, Malcolm C.; Bell, Susan K. (1997). Classification of Mammals Above the Species Level. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0231110138. OCLC 37345734. 
  • Missiaen, P; Smith, T; Guo, DY; Bloch, JI; Gingerich, PD (August 2006). "Asian gliriform origin for arctostylopid mammals". Naturwissenschaften. 93 (8): 407–11. doi:10.1007/s00114-006-0122-1. PMID 16865388. 
  • Roth, Santiago (1903). "Los Ungulados Sudamericanos". Anales del Museo de La Plata (Sección Paleontológica). 5: 1–36. OCLC 14012855. 
  • Welker, F.; Collins, M. J.; Thomas, J. A.; Wadsley, M.; Brace, S.; Cappellini, E.; Turvey, S. T.; Reguero, M.; Gelfo, J. N.; Kramarz, A.; Burger, J.; Thomas-Oates, J.; Ashford, D. A.; Ashton, P. D.; Rowsell, K.; Porter, D. M.; Kessler, B.; Fischer, R.; Baessmann, C.; Kaspar, S.; Olsen, J. V.; Kiley, P.; Elliott, J. A.; Kelstrup, C. D.; Mullin, V.; Hofreiter, M.; Willerslev, E.; Hublin, J.-J.; Orlando, L.; Barnes, I.; MacPhee, R. D. E. (2015-03-18). "Ancient proteins resolve the evolutionary history of Darwin's South American ungulates". Nature. 522: 81–84. doi:10.1038/nature14249. ISSN 0028-0836. PMID 25799987. 
  • Westbury, M.; Baleka, S.; Barlow, A.; Hartmann, S.; Paijmans, J. L. A.; Kramarz, A.; Forasiepi, A. M.; Bond, M.; Gelfo, J. N.; Reguero, M. A.; López-Mendoza, P.; Taglioretti, M.; Scaglia, F.; Rinderknecht, A.; Jones, W.; Mena, F.; Billet, G.; de Muizon, C.; Aguilar, J. L.; MacPhee, R. D. E.; Hofreiter, M. (2017-06-27). "A mitogenomic timetree for Darwin's enigmatic South American mammal Macrauchenia patachonica". Nature Communications. 8: 15951. doi:10.1038/ncomms15951.