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Paul Klee

Paul Klee was a Swiss-born artist. His individual style was influenced by movements in art that included Expressionism and Surrealism. Klee was a natural draftsman who experimented with and deeply explored color theory, writing about it extensively, he and his colleague, Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky, both taught at the Bauhaus school of art and architecture in Germany. His works reflect his dry humor and his sometimes childlike perspective, his personal moods and beliefs, his musicality. First of all, the art of living. Paul Klee was born in Münchenbuchsee, Switzerland, as the second child of German music teacher Hans Wilhelm Klee and Swiss singer Ida Marie Klee, née Frick. Under Swiss law citizenship was defined by the father's nationality and Klee thus inherited his father's German citizenship, his sister Mathilde was born on 28 January 1876 in Walzenhausen. Their father came from Tann and studied singing, piano and violin at the Stuttgart Conservatory, meeting there his future wife Ida Frick.

Hans Wilhelm Klee was active as a music teacher at the Bern State Seminary in Hofwil near Bern until 1931. Klee was able to develop his music skills as his parents encouraged and inspired him throughout his life. In 1880, his family moved to Bern, where they in 1897, after a number of changes of residence, moved into their own house in the Kirchenfeld district. From 1886 to 1890, Klee visited primary school and received, at the age of 7, violin classes at the Municipal Music School, he was so talented on violin that, aged 11, he received an invitation to play as an extraordinary member of the Bern Music Association. In his early years, following his parents’ wishes, Klee focused on becoming a musician, he stated, "I didn't find the idea of going in for music creatively attractive in view of the decline in the history of musical achievement." As a musician, he played and felt bound to traditional works of the eighteenth and nineteenth century, but as an artist he craved the freedom to explore radical ideas and styles.

At sixteen, Klee's landscape drawings show considerable skill. Around 1897, Klee started his diary, which he kept until 1918, which has provided scholars with valuable insight into his life and thinking. During his school years, he avidly drew in his school books, in particular drawing caricatures, demonstrating skill with line and volume, he passed his final exams at the "Gymnasium" of Bern, where he qualified in the Humanities. With his characteristic dry wit, he wrote, "After all, it’s rather difficult to achieve the exact minimum, it involves risks." On his own time, in addition to his deep interests in music and art, Klee was a great reader of literature, a writer on art theory and aesthetics. With his parents' reluctant permission, in 1898 Klee began studying art at the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich with Heinrich Knirr and Franz von Stuck, he seemed to lack any natural color sense. He recalled, "During the third winter I realized that I would never learn to paint." During these times of youthful adventure, Klee spent much time in pubs and had affairs with lower class women and artists' models.

He had an illegitimate son in 1900. After receiving his Fine Arts degree, Klee went to Italy from October 1901 to May 1902 with friend Hermann Haller, they stayed in Rome and studied the master painters of past centuries. He exclaimed, "the Vatican have spoken to me. Humanism wants to suffocate me." He responded to the colors of Italy, but sadly noted, "that a long struggle lies in store for me in this field of color." For Klee, color represented the optimism and nobility in art, a hope for relief from the pessimistic nature he expressed in his black-and-white grotesques and satires. Returning to Bern, he lived with his parents for several years, took occasional art classes. By 1905, he was developing some experimental techniques, including drawing with a needle on a blackened pane of glass, resulting in fifty-seven works including his Portrait of My Father. In the years 1903–05 he completed a cycle of eleven zinc-plate etchings called Inventions, his first exhibited works, in which he illustrated several grotesque characters.

He commented, "though I'm satisfied with my etchings I can't go on like this. I’m not a specialist." Klee was still dividing his time with music, playing the violin in an orchestra and writing concert and theater reviews. Klee married Bavarian pianist Lily Stumpf in 1906 and they had one son named Felix Paul in the following year, they lived in a suburb of Munich, while she gave piano lessons and occasional performances, he kept house and tended to his art work. His attempt to be a magazine illustrator failed. Klee's art work progressed for the next five years from having to divide his time with domestic matters, as he tried to find a new approach to his art. In 1910, he had his first solo exhibition in Bern, which travelled to three Swiss cities. In January 1911 Alfred Kubin met Klee in Munich and encouraged him to illustrate Voltaire's Ca

Platymeris

Platymeris is a genus of assassin bug. Platymeris species are used in laboratories and as pets; the venom of this genus has been studied in a laboratory setting. Platymeris biguttatus Platymeris charon Jeannel, 1917 Platymeris erebus Distant, 1902 Platymeris flavipes Bergroth, 1920 Platymeris guttatipennis Stål, 1859 Platymeris insignis Germar & Berendt, 1856 Platymeris kavirondo Jeannel, 1917 Platymeris laevicollis Distant, 1919 Platymeris nigripes Villiers, 1944 Platymeris pyrrhula Germar, 1837 Platymeris rhadamanthus Gerstaecker, 1873 Platymeris rufipes Jeannel, 1917 Platymeris swirei Distant, 1919 "Bugs of the World" by George McGavin, ISBN 978-0-7137-2786-9 "Insects and Other Terrestrial Arthropods" by George McGavin Easy Insects: "How to keep Platymeris biguttatus" http://www.reduviidae.de/biologie.html Assassin Bug Care Sheet

2014 FIBA Europe 3x3 Championships

The 2014 FIBA Europe 3x3 Championships, hosted at the University Square in Bucharest, was the inaugural European 3x3 basketball event that featured separate competitions for men's and women's national teams. The tournament was held from 5 to 7 September 2014. In the final of the men's tournament, host Romania beat Slovenia to win their first European championship title. In the final of the women's tournament, Russia beat Slovenia to win their first European championship title. Slovenia finished in second place in women's tournaments; the qualification events took place in the summer of 2014. A total of 15 teams of each gender qualified for the final tournament. Was held in Zánka, Hungary, 12–13 July 2014. Top five will qualify. Pool APool BKnock-out stageSwitzerland qualified to the Final Tournament as fifth qualified. Was held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, 19–20 July 2014. Top four, excluding hosts Romania, will qualify. Pool APool BKnock-out stageAndorra qualified to the Final Tournament as fifth qualified.

Was held in Riga, Latvia, 2–3 August 2014. Top six will qualify. Pool APool BKnockout stageItaly and Estonia qualified to the Final Tournament as fifth and sixth qualified teams. Was held in Zánka, Hungary, 12–13 July 2014. Top five, excluding hosts Romania, will qualify. Pool APool BKnock-out stageSlovenia qualified to the Final Tournament as fifth qualified. Was held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, 19–20 July 2014. Top four will qualify. Pool APool BKnock-out stage Was held in Riga, Latvia, 2–3 August 2014. Top six will qualify. Pool APool BKnockout stageIreland and Slovakia qualified to the Final Tournament as fifth and sixth qualified teams. Groups were announced on 27 August 2014. Pool A Pool B Pool C Pool D Pool A Pool B Pool C Pool D Results and information of the FIBA Europe Championships Official website